Jericho helps Owens retain title at WWE Roadblock

first_imgFlair continued to pounce in OT, capitalizing on the injury as the Boss was forced to tap out to another Figure Eight.Cesaro and Sheamus also dethroned the New Day, ending its 483-day run as Raw Tag Team Champions.Setting history as the longest reigning tag titlists in history, The New Day fell to the unlikely duo as the Swiss Superman faked a tag on the Celtic Warrior, allowing Kofi Kingston to nail Cesaro with the Trouble in Paradise. As a confused Kingston made the pin on Cesaro, Sheamus dove on him to secure the win for his team and snatch away the titles.Rich Swann retained his WWE Cruiserweight Championship, topping TJ Perkins and Brian Kendrick in their triple threat match.Swann nailed Perkins with a surprise superkick to secure the three-count.ADVERTISEMENT Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH United States Champion Roman Reigns and Seth Rollins powerbomb WWE Universal Champion Kevin Owens through the announce table to close Roadblock: End of the Line. Photo by WWE.comKevin Owens and Chris Jericho’s masterplan worked to a tee as Owens retained his WWE Universal Championship at Roadblock: End of the Line Monday (Manila time) in Pittsburgh.Jericho interjected himself in the main event and hit his best friend Owens with a Codebreaker to force a disqualification on United States Champion Roman Reigns. It was later revealed as a ploy though, as Owens and Jericho made amends to their friendship.ADVERTISEMENT Neville made a surprise appearance after the match, attacking Swann and Perkins as he made his intentions clear for the belt.Sami Zayn also survived 10 minutes against Braun Strowman, nailing the big man with a Helluva Kick as time expired.In the pre-show, Rusev beat Big Cass via countout as the Bulgarian Brute and his wife Lana ambushed Enzo Amore at ringside after the match.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK SPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliCharlotte Flair also became a four-time Raw Women’s Champion, topping Sasha Banks, 3-2 in sudden death overtime of their 30-minute Ironman match.With Banks leading, 2-1 with six minutes left after forcing a tap out off a Bank Statement, Flair went on to work on the champion’s right knee before locking in a Figure Eight for the submission win at the waning seconds. Messi mesmerizes in Barcelona win over Espanyol Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes MOST READ We are young PH among economies most vulnerable to virus View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Senators to proceed with review of VFA Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Owens earlier costed Jericho his match against Seth Rollins. Reeling from the distraction, a dazed Jericho had his Codebreaker reversed to a Pedigree.But the two did pay the price, as Reigns and Rollins got their payback, powerbombing the two to separate announce tables, shades of their old glory as members of The Shield, to end the show.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are young Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

5 bird species lose protections, more at risk in new Indonesia decree

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forests, Human-wildlife Conflict, Illegal Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Pet Trade, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Regulations, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Five bird species in Indonesia have lost their protected status under a new ministerial decree, issued last month in response to complaints from songbird collectors.The decree also establishes additional guidelines for birds to be granted protected status, which effectively sets the stage for any species to be dropped from the list if it is deemed of high economic value to the songbird fan community.Scientists and wildlife experts have criticized the removal of the five species from the protected list, and the new criteria for granting protected status.Indonesia is home to the largest number of threatened bird species in Asia, but their populations in the wild are severely threatened by overexploitation. JAKARTA — A new decree from Indonesian authorities drops five bird species from a newly expanded list of protected wildlife, and potentially sets the stage for more to follow by widening the scope under which protected status can be rescinded.The capture and trade of the white-rumped shama (Kittacincla malabarica), Javan pied starling (Gracupica jalla), straw-headed bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus), Sangihe shrikethrush (Colluricincla sanghirensis) and little shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) will remain illegal without a government permit, but the lack of protected status means violators won’t face the jail time or hefty fines prescribed in the 1990 Conservation Act.Four of the birds were among hundreds of species added to the ministry’s list of protected species this past June. The fifth bird, the little shrikethrush, was on the original list published in 1999. All five have now been removed from the list following the publication on Sept. 5 of a decree from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.The little shrikethrush. Image courtesy of Dominic Sherony/Wikimedia Commons.The capture of wild birds is to be regulated through a government permit-and-quota system that is supposed to consider recommendations from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), a state-funded think tank. Mohammad Irham, a senior ornithologist at LIPI, said his institution would reject requests to capture any of the five now-unprotected species from the wild.He criticized the rescinding of their protected status, saying it would hasten their decline in the wild. “Our decision is based on scientific data, papers and surveys on the populations of these species in the wild,” he told Mongabay.The ministerial decree also establishes additional guidelines for birds to be granted protected status, such as the popularity of a given species for breeding and for songbird competitions.Under current rules, protected status can be granted to a species that is native to Indonesia, has a limited range, and has a small and dwindling population. But the decree adds new criteria for birds alone: the popularity of a species among breeders and hobbyists, the extent to which it contributes to people’s livelihoods, and the frequency with which it appears in songbird competitions.“There’s a huge local economy aspect to the birdkeeping business,” Wiratno, the environment ministry’s director general for biodiversity conservation, told reporters on Oct. 2.A straw-headed bulbul at a bird park in western Java, Indonesia. Image by Bernard Dupont/Wikimedia Commons.Field research by LIPI between 2001 and 2014 failed to find the straw-headed bulbul in the highlighted areas that were previously known habitats for the species. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).Bird launderingBirdkeeping is a popular pastime in Indonesia, particularly on the island of Java. The practice spread widely as a government-led transmigration program, beginning in the Dutch colonial era, relocated millions of landless Javanese to other parts of the country.Songbirds are prized for their use in contests, which have spawned networks of clubs, online forums and blogs. President Joko Widodo, himself an avid songbird collector, said in March that birdkeeping contributed an estimated 1.7 trillion rupiah ($114 million) annually to the nation’s economy.The permit-and-quota system applies to all birds, whether or not they’re on the protected list. Anyone convicted of illegally catching a protected species faces up to five years in prison and 100 million rupiah ($6,600) in fines under the 1990 Conservation Act. Those who illegally catch non-protected birds face only the prospect of having the birds seized and a token administrative sanction (if they run a breeding facility).Registered breeding facilities are allowed to catch a protected species in the wild for captive-breeding purposes and sell the offspring, which, crucially, are not designated as protected. The facilities are required to release 10 percent of their captive-born stock back into the wild.But the key issue, observers say, is that captive breeders often fail to properly register either their facilities or their birds. This opens the door for wild-caught birds to be laundered through the facilities.“Some claim that their animal is [captive-bred] offspring, but it turns out to be wild-caught,” Wiratno said.Indonesia is home to the largest number of threatened bird species in Asia, according to TRAFFIC, a wildlife trade monitoring group. Collectors tend to prefer wild-caught birds, seen as better singers than captive-bred ones. The premium they’re willing to pay gives traders plenty of incentive to stock wild-caught birds rather than go to the trouble of breeding them in captivity.In the new decree, the environment ministry has given captive breeders and owners of newly protected species a two-year grace period to register their animals and businesses.A white-rumped shama. Image by Koshy Koshy/Flickr.Field research by LIPI between 2001 and 2014 found the white-rumped shama only in the areas highlighted in green. The areas highlighted in pink are the species’ previously known habitats. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).Shrikethrush surpriseIn September, Mongabay reported that three of the birds — the shama, starling and bulbul — had been removed from the list. Owners’ groups had specifically demanded that the protected status for these three birds be rescinded, citing the potential for loss of livelihoods among those employed in the songbird trade and large investments already made in breeding facilities. The ministry acknowledged these concerns in defending its decision last month.A further review of the latest version of the list, however, shows it also removes protections for the two shrikethrushes. The reason for their removal is unclear, especially since the little shrikethrush has been a protected species since 1999. LIPI’s Irham said the ministry had never mentioned these two birds in discussions about the protected list. Owners’ groups have not specifically asked for the pair to be taken off the list, according to Bagya Rachmadi, head of Pelestari Burung Indonesia, a bird-breeding group.“These two birds are hardly found in breeding facilities,” Bagya told Mongabay. “I don’t think they’re popular in [songbird] competitions either.”Wiratno appeared confused when asked why these two birds were removed from the list. He asked whether one of the species in question was the orange-headed thrush (Geokichla citrina), which has a similar Indonesian name to the two strikethrushes. “I will have to check again,” he said. He didn’t respond to multiple subsequent requests for comment.“These shrikethrushes were on the protected list because of their critical population in the wild,” Irham said.An illustration of the Sangihe shrikethrush. Image courtesy of Burung Indonesia.Counterproductive to bird conservation?Scientists and wildlife experts have taken issue with the new criteria for granting birds protected status.Irham called the new requirements “a compromise between the environment ministry and the songbird fan groups.”He noted that these points were not enumerated in the 1990 Conservation Act or a 1999 government regulation on wildlife conservation.“We must really ensure whether the new provisions will support conservation or become counterproductive,” Irham said.Darmawan Liswanto, a scientific adviser for the Titian Lestari Foundation, which advocates for environmental sustainability, said only the president had the authority to introduce new criteria this way.“Neither the 1990 Conservation Act nor the 1999 government regulation on wildlife conservation give the environment minister the authority to change the criteria for granting protected status,” he told Mongabay.He added the criteria were far too wide in scope; someone caught trapping a protected bird in the wild could easily justify their actions by arguing that the species was important to breeders.“The minister has made it more difficult for the people who are on the ground to enforce the law,” Darmawan said.Raynaldo Sembiring, a deputy director at the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), said the addition of the new criteria had set a bad precedent, given that it was a concession to demands from owners’ groups and not supported by scientific evidence.“I don’t think this ministerial regulation would have been issued without the push from the songbird fan groups,” Raynaldo told Mongabay.“While one is strictly for conservation and based on scientific data, the other is clearly just for the enjoyment of certain groups,” Raynaldo said of the difference between the criteria in the conservation act and the government regulation, on one hand, and the ministerial regulation on the other.A rendering of the critically endangered Javan pied starling at the bottom. Image courtesy of Joseph Smit/Wikimedia Commons.Field research by LIPI between 2001 and 2014 failed to find the Javan pied starling in the highlighted areas that were previously known habitats for the species. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI).A top concern, Irham said, is the implementation of these additional factors to other bird species that are also popular in captive breeding and songbird competitions.“We’re worried that these considerations will have a stronger influence in designating protection status than prioritizing the real condition in the wild,” he said. “These bird species are not the only ones that are popular among owners and breeders.”Conservationists have called on the environment ministry to revoke the new decree and revert to the regulation it issued in June.“The ministry must understand that there has been a fundamental mistake in the [new] ministerial regulation and there isn’t any other solution except to revoke it,” Darmawan said.ICEL’s Raynaldo said the ministerial regulation could be annulled if challenged in court.“Plugging the loopholes in the ministerial regulation would be very difficult because it contradicts the prevailing government regulation and act that it’s based on,” he said.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cambodia accuses Vietnam of complicity in illegal cross-border logging

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Endangered Species, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Rosewood, Tropical Forests Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Cambodia has accused neighboring Vietnam of systemically accepting fraudulent permits for rare, illegally trafficked rosewood timber.Siamese rosewood (Dalbergia Conchinchinensis) is one of the most valuable species of tree in the world and has been destructively logged in Cambodia.Items made from rosewood have been known to sell for millions of dollars in markets like China. HANOI — Cambodia has asked Interpol to investigate Vietnam after accusing its neighbor of knowingly accepting fraudulent permits for rare, illegally logged rosewood timber for transport across their shared border.Siamese rosewood (Dalbergia cochinchinensis) is one of the most valuable species of tree in the world to timber criminals. A single cubic meter can sell for as much as $5,000 in Cambodia, although that amount goes up significantly once it’s smuggled into Vietnam or China. The potential illegal profits are tantalizing: a single, ornately carved bedpost has been known to sell for as much as $1 million in Shanghai.Even after Cambodia banned logging of the rare and protected tree in 2013, stocks of the species have been devastated across the border with Vietnam by an insatiable industry.In 2017, Cambodia submitted letters to the U.N.’s Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which reveal how government officials requested Vietnam take action against the logging.Ty Sokhun, head of Cambodia’s CITES Management Authority, said in a letter to the U.N.’s International Environment House in October 2017 that Vietnam “continued to allow the entry into the country of rosewood, repeatedly referencing CITES permits, notwithstanding that they had been previously informed on several occasions of the illegality of those permits.”Jago Wadley, senior forests campaigner with the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), said that although there were likely to have been errors on both sides, Vietnam appeared to be at fault on this occasion.“Ultimately a state party to a U.N. convention has testified to the effect that Vietnam knew that fake permits were being used and ignored that information and continued accepting those fake permits,” he told Voice of America in an interview. “If the Vietnamese management authority has accepted those permits in lieu of information that the permits were fake, then it has done something wrong under the convention and needs to be held accountable.”Piles of rosewood litter the ground in Đồng Kỳ, Vietnam late last year. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.This is also not the first time such an accusation has been levied against Vietnam. An in-depth report by the EIA in May 2017 revealed that Vietnamese officials, companies and private individuals had smuggled enormous amounts of illegally logged timber from protected areas of Cambodia into Vietnam.In response to Cambodia’s claims, Ha Thi Tuyet Nga, director of Vietnam’s CITES Management Authority, wrote a letter to the EIA that questioned the organization’s intention in “publishing one-sided reports that undermine Vietnam’s efforts in combatting transnational timber trade crimes in Viet Nam and Cambodia.”The letter does not, however, deny the claims made against Vietnam, but rather states that Cambodia had failed to notify Vietnam about it ban on timber exports until March 2017.Nga also noted her frustration that the claims against Vietnam came at a sensitive time — just before the signing of a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) agreement between Vietnam and the European Union. On paper, the agreement would ensure that all timber exported to the EU from Vietnam has legal, verifiable origins, a move that has caused some to worry about the effect on illegal logging and natural habitats.“Rosewood species are an integral part of the Southeast Asia Forest Ecosystem,” Thibault Ledecq, regional forest coordinator for the WWF, said in an interview. “Curbing illegal logging is critical to not only protect this precious species but also the integrity of protected areas where they are found.”Ledecq said illegal logging was “destroying homes for endangered wildlife, livelihoods for communities that are managing their resources sustainably, and a critical defense in the fight against climate change.”Siamese rosewood has been almost entirely removed from certain border areas following trading under fake CITES permits, according to experts. The EIA’s Wadley said the problem was so severe that two protected areas, including Cambodia’s Snoul Wildlife Sanctuary, were dissolved earlier this year by royal decree after being almost entirely stripped of forest.The rare wood is laundered through a quota system in Vietnam, which ultimately gives it lawful status. The entire trade is worth at least $75 million and estimated kickbacks add up to as much as $13 million.last_img read more

Satellite trackers help fight vultures’ extinction in southern Africa

first_imgBirds, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, data, GPS, GPS tracking, Human-wildlife Conflict, Monitoring, Renewable Energy, Tagging, Technology, Tracking, Vultures, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Vultures in southern Africa are being killed, mainly by eating carcasses poisoned by farmers, and in collisions with power lines and wind turbines.Concerned about population declines, the Maloti-Drakensberg Vulture Project began tracking vulture movements with small GPS transmitters, only to find them dying at a rapid rate.The three-dimensional tracking data showing the overlap between vulture breeding and roosting areas resulted in cancellation of a pair of proposed wind farms in Lesotho and a call for more ecologically informed siting of needed renewable energy infrastructure. CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Every other hour, Sonja Krüger logs onto her website and checks the birds’ status. Pharoah is taking a mud bath in the mountains, Jeremia is on a roost site viewing the Maloti mountain range, and Mollie is scouring the grasslands for a fresh carcass.“A GPS location of the birds is taken very hour, and it shows where the vultures are flying to, at what speed, their favorite cliff roost sites, and where they feed,” Krüger, an ecologist with the NGO Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, told Mongabay.Data have told us a lot about these birds’ movement and population trends, she added.Ezemvelo runs Maloti-Drakensberg Park, a World Heritage Site within the mountain range of the same name. The range is home to vultures in Lesotho and the provinces of KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Free State in South Africa.An immature bearded vulture posing. Image by Sonja Krueger.The isolated southern African population of bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus meridionalis) has declined by more than 30 percent over the past few decades, with fewer than 350 individual birds and 109 breeding pairs remaining in the region.Cape vultures (Gyps coprotheres), found only in southern Africa, are endangered, with 2,900 breeding pairs. Approximately 1,450 individuals, roughly 20 percent of the population, live in the Maloti-Drakensberg mountains.The roll callIn 2006, Krüger started the Maloti-Drakensberg Vulture Project to address the decline in vulture populations within the mountains. She said the vultures feasted on carcasses and thus kept the environment clean, so a decline in numbers was a huge loss for the ecosystem.With support from several environmental institutions, including Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, the Maloti-Drakensberg Transfrontier Programme, Wildlands Conservation Trust, and the Endangered Wildlife Trust, the project began tracking the birds’ movements and habits.“Catching the vultures was not easy,” Krüger said. “It was challenging, but rewarding.”Sonja Krüger and the project team takes measurements before fitting each bird with a backpack GPS transmitter. Image by Shannon Hoffman.The project tracked 25 bearded vultures and a few Cape vultures, of both sexes and various age groups, by designing and fitting miniature backpack harnesses for the birds to carry satellite GPS transmitters. It also used the tags to assess the birds’ survival rates and causes of mortality to assist efforts to recover the populations and build awareness of the importance of vultures in ecological systems.“Numbers were declining, and we wanted to know what was causing the mortality of the vultures,” Krüger said. “We sought a better idea of where the vultures move, and [wanted to] get a full ranging territory, providing data on feeding and breeding sites.”Ben Hoffman, a falconer based in Durban, in KwaZulu-Natal province, fitted the transmitters. Two years earlier, he had started Raptor Rescue, providing specialist treatment to injured, sick, and orphaned birds of prey.“I have used radio trackers on my birds when I flew them for many years,” he said, “so I had some experience in the field of tracking raptors.”The transmitter on each 6- to 11-kilogram (13- to 24-pound) bird costs $3,000 and is powered by a tiny, lightweight solar panel, with a combined weight of about 70 grams (2.5 ounces). The transmitter relays a bird’s location data hourly between 5 a.m. and 8 p.m. through the Argos satellite network to a website where Krüger accesses the data. The researchers pay $68 per vulture monthly for data processing.Krüger fits a backpack GPS transmitter on a vulture. Covering the bird’s eyes calms it down as the miniature harness is put in place. Image by Shannon Hoffman.The transmitters have been sending back data on the birds’ movements for the past decade, longer than the maximum seven-year life span specified by Microwave Telemetry, the U.S. manufacturer of the satellite trackers.Some vultures, however, started falling off the radar only a few months after their trackers were fitted. Krüger and her team went to investigate.They found them dead, often in very inaccessible locations on commercial farms, communal land, and even in protected areas. The main cause of death was poisoning from lead and agricultural chemicals.“Farmers trying to protect their sheep or cattle from being attacked by jackals often laced carcasses of dead animals with poison,” Krüger said. “Vultures ate poisoned carcasses and were found a distance away from the feeding spots.”In one particularly severe incident, more than 50 Cape vultures and a jackal were found dead near a sheep carcass on a farm. “This was a clear case,” Krüger said, “and [the perpetrator] was prosecuted.”An immature bearded vulture flies off carrying its new backpack GPS transmitter. Knowing in which areas and at what altitudes the vultures spend their time enables researchers to assess the risks of energy infrastructure. Image by Shannon Hoffman.Only six of the original 25 tagged vultures survive. One died from a power-line collision, nine were poisoned, and another was shot. One was found dead as recently as this past November; tests have not yet confirmed the cause of death.Vultures were also used for traditional medicine, Krüger said. “Vulture body parts are believed to be potent for enabling psychic abilities, foresight, and increased intelligence.” Since numbers of all vultures in southern Africa were on the decline, any use of these birds was unsustainable, she added.The raptors’ survival is also threatened by electrocution on poorly designed power poles and collisions with electrical cables and, more recently, wind turbines.Controversial Lesotho wind powerIn 2012, the government of the landlocked kingdom of Lesotho approved wind farm operations in the country’s northeast, proposed by PowerNET Development. This first-ever large-scale development of two wind farms in Lesotho, consisting of 42 and 100 turbines, respectively, was controversial. The site lay within the breeding, roosting, and foraging grounds of important populations of both bearded and Cape vultures.The company planned to set up multiple wind farms throughout the Lesotho highlands, ultimately aiming to produce about 6,000 megawatts from up to 4,000 turbines.In 2014, Ken Mwathe, then BirdLife International’s Africa policy program coordinator, warned in a statement that African governments needed to approach renewable energy projects carefully to ensure they did not threaten birds and biodiversity.An adult bearded vulture at a feeding site. Found in various parts of Asia, bearded vultures have disappeared from most of their range in Africa. Image by Shane Elliott.The wind farm developer proposed mitigation measures, including the use of radar linked to a system that would automatically shut turbines down when birds were at risk of colliding. But the impact assessment’s avifaunal report indicated that the project would have severe negative effects on vultures and other sensitive bird groups, even with mitigation.The project would not be feasible if these measures were implemented, said Samantha Ralston, birds and renewable energy manager at BirdLife South Africa, because wind turbines would not generate electricity when not turning.Ralston said the conservation community lacked sufficient information to know whether proposed mitigation measures would be effective in substantially reducing the risk to the vultures. She called for more research to understand “how often, at what height and under what conditions the birds move through the site.”An application of tracking dataThe outcomes of Krüger’s team’s research then became handy.A study using data from 2009 to 2013 of the three-dimensional movements of 21 of the 25 bearded vultures fitted with the solar-powered GPS tags was published in 2015.“We used data collected in Lesotho and South Africa to create [collision] risk models,” said raptor biologist and co-author Arjun Amar, of the FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology at the University of Cape Town. “The models were further refined by incorporating flying heights at risk of collision to predict areas prone to impact with wind turbines.”The transmitters generated data, logging the vultures’ location, altitude, and speed every hour during daylight, allowing the team to develop different models for birds of different ages.Close-up of the backpack GPS transmitter. Fitting a tracking tag on a large bird like a vulture takes a team. Image by Stephanie Walters.The sites proposed for the two wind farms were in areas heavily used by vultures and therefore likely to damage the vulture population through collisions, the study concluded. “Altitudes of fixes of adults and non-adults,” the authors said in their paper, “showed that they spent 55 percent and 66 percent of their time, respectively, at heights that placed them at risk of collision.”“We did not want to stand in the way of development,” Amar told Mongabay. “Our aim was to produce maps that could be used to promote sustainable development.”The wind energy developers and financiers backing the wind farm cancelled their project. Four years later, in early 2018, the U.K.-based firm AGR-Renewables resurrected the project.“We have delivered a number of wind and solar energy projects in the UK over the last years, all in line with the environmental standards required under the UK planning system,” Tom Forsyth of AGR-Renewables told The Star, a South African newspaper, in February 2018.The company was aware of the concerns raised about the project, Forsyth added, and it had employed a team of bird specialists to carry out “an intensive programme of bird monitoring — something that has hitherto not been carried out … to evaluate the potential impact of the project and the suitability or otherwise of the site to accommodate the proposed wind farm,” he told The Star.An adult bearded vulture with a backpack transmitter. The tag weighs around 1 percent of the bird’s weight. Image by Rickert van der Westhuizen.In the end, the new developer also withdrew from the project, Krüger said. “They took heed of our concerns.”Krüger’s team still tracks four bearded and two Cape vultures from the original group, and she checks on them regularly.“The design of the project has managed to get excellent results,” Krüger said, adding the technology has been adapted for tracking other bird species, including hornbills.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Sue Palminterilast_img read more

Indonesia to get first payment from Norway under $1b REDD+ scheme

first_imgIndonesia and Norway have agreed on a first payment from a $1 billion deal under which Indonesia preserves its rainforests to curb carbon dioxide emissions.The agreement comes nearly a decade since the deal was signed in 2010, with the delay attributed largely to the need for legislation and policy frameworks to be put in place, as well as a change in the Indonesian government since then.The amount of the first payment still needs to be negotiated by both sides, with Indonesia pushing for a higher valuation than the $5 per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent that Norway paid Brazil under a similar deal.Indonesia still has work to do to ensure a consistent pace of progress and tackle the forest fires that account for much of the loss of its forests. JAKARTA — It’s taken nearly a decade, but Indonesia is finally set to receive the first part of a $1 billion payment pledged by the Norwegian government for preserving some of the Southeast Asian country’s vast tropical rainforests.Indonesia’s environment minister, Siti Nurbaya Bakar, and her Norwegian counterpart, Ola Elvestuen, made the announcement in Jakarta on Feb. 16. The payment, whose amount is yet to be determined, is for Indonesia preventing the emission of 4.8 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) through reducing its rate of deforestation in 2017.“Indonesia has embarked on bold regulatory reforms, and it is showing results,” Elvestuen said. “It may be too early to see a clear trend, but if deforestation continues to drop we stand ready to increase our annual payments to reward Indonesia’s results and support its efforts.”The two countries signed the $1 billion pact in 2010, under the REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) mechanism. In exchange for the funding, Indonesia would have to slow its emissions from deforestation, which accounts for the bulk of its CO2 emissions.That it’s taken so long for the first payment to be announced is due to a combination of the structuring of the agreement and a change in the Indonesian government since the 2010 signing.The partnership is led by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative, under which the oil-rich Scandinavian country has pledged to underwrite tropical forest conservation programs in Indonesia as well as Brazil, Liberia, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Guyana.The cooperation between the countries is divided into phases, in which the first two phases are about getting the rainforest countries ready to stop deforestation through changes in national legislation and frameworks.Phase three starts when the rainforest countries manage to reduce deforestation, and that’s when the fund starts paying out, based on reduced emissions.Indonesia was mired in the two initial phases following a setback in 2015, when President Joko Widodo, who took office a year earlier from Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, disbanded BP REDD+, the agency his predecessor had set up to coordinate the scheme.Widodo delegated the agency’s duties and powers to the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, headed by Siti. (The move was part of a wider restructuring headlined by the merger of the previously separate ministries of forestry and of the environment.)It also took long for Indonesia to prepare a comprehensive integrated measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) system necessary to account for its progress in reducing emissions, further delaying the transition into phase three.REDD+ is designed to keep tropical forests standing, and carbon sequestered. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.‘A matter of life and death’Environmentalists have lauded the latest development, which mark’s Indonesia’s entry into the phase at which it’s starting to roll back emissions from deforestation. The funding serves as both an acknowledgement of the years of efforts to reach this stage of protecting the country’s forests, and an incentive to boost measures to combat deforestation.“This is fantastic news for the climate, for the world’s animal and plant species, and for the millions of people who depend on these forests,” said Øyvind Eggen, director of the Rainforest Foundation Norway, an NGO.Indonesia is home to the world’s third-largest span of tropical rainforest, after Brazil and the Democratic Republic of Congo. When these rainforests are destroyed or degraded, large amount of CO2 emissions are released into the atmosphere.Indonesia is already the fifth-largest emitter in the world, largely through its forestry sector. That makes preserving Indonesia’s rainforests pivotal for the world to prevent catastrophic climate change, experts say. Saving these forests is also critical for the survival of the rich biodiversity they host.“Saving this rainforest is a matter of life and death, and is important to us all,” Eggen said.Female Sumatran rhino in Way Kambas, Sumatra, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Quantifying emissions reductionsNow that Indonesia’s MRV protocol is in place, it has to convince Norway about the integrity of the system in verifying that reductions in CO2 emissions really are being achieved.“We’ve been discussing this MRV protocol [with Norway] since last year because it will affect the calculation of carbon emissions that we’ve reduced,” said Ruandha Agung Suhardiman, the Indonesian environment ministry’s head of climate change.The country initially measured its progress in reducing emissions from deforestation by using as its baseline the deforestation rate in 1990, which was inordinately high. That would inflate the apparent progress being made toward reductions, Ruandha said.Both countries subsequently agreed that Indonesia’s results should be measured against a 10-year average level of emissions for the 2006-2016 period. Annual emissions during that period were estimated at 237 million tons CO2e from deforestation and 42 million tons from forest degradation.“The government then started to issue regulations aimed at lowering emissions,” Ruandha said. “[Norway] wouldn’t have accepted not having such regulations in place, because then we might have lowered our emissions based on sheer luck, for example because of weather factors.”A crested black macaque in Sulawesi. Image for Mongabay.Defining deforestationNorway’s acknowledgement of Indonesia’s MRV system marks another important development in Indonesia’s forest management, says Arief Wijaya, a senior manager for climate and forests at the World Resources Institute (WRI) Indonesia.Indonesia has for years courted controversy over the definition of what counts as deforestation.The term is almost universally understood to mean the conversion of natural forest cover to other land-use categories. That includes clearing forests for the cultivation of industrial plantations: acacia and eucalyptus for pulpwood, for instance.The Indonesian government, on the other hand, doesn’t take that view. It counts man-made plantations, including industrial pulpwood plantations, as forested areas. That means that when non-forested areas are planted with acacia and eucalyptus, they are considered forest.The WRI, a Washington-based think tank with an office in Indonesia, has cautioned that the disparity may hamper Indonesia’s bid to seek foreign funding to support its initiatives to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation.Without a universally agreed-on definition of deforestation, it might be difficult for Indonesia to cite its own data to claim funding.But Norway’s acceptance of Indonesia’s MRV system indicates that Jakarta has abandoned its own definition, at least for the purposes of the deal with Norway, according to Arief.“It’s up to Indonesia to report its deforestation rate in accordance with its own definition,” he said. “But look — Norway only considers emissions reductions from deforestation in natural forests. It means that when natural forests are converted into industrial plantations, deforestation has happened, according to this bilateral agreement.”Arief said this made Indonesia’s published data on emissions reductions more accountable.“It means it’s true that Indonesia has indeed managed to reduce 4.8 million tons of CO2e,” he said, “especially since the figure accounts for uncertainties. I’m quite confident about the number.”He said the 2017 reduction was the equivalent of preventing the deforestation of 100 square kilometers (38 square miles) of forest, on the assumption that a hectare of tropical forest in Indonesia holds an average 132 tons of CO2e.“A hundred square kilometers seems very small, compared to the forestry ministry’s data on declining deforestation, which was very high,” at 1,510 square kilometers in 2017. “But the ministry’s figure counts industrial plantations,” Arief said.Fires smoldering from a peat forest in West Kalimantan. Image by Aseanty Pahlevi/Mongabay Indonesia.Money mattersWhile the first tranche of the payment has been agreed to, there’s still some way to go before the money is actually released.First, both countries need to agree on the amount. Ruandha said the Indonesian government wanted a high valuation for each ton of CO2e reduced to be high, more than what Brazil earned under its own deal with Norway.“Of course we want Indonesia to get a higher price,” he said. “It takes tremendous effort to reduce deforestation and forest degradation in Indonesia. It doesn’t happen overnight. And how would we compensate for people’s livelihoods? If they can’t cut down trees, what’s the compensation [for them]? That’s why we don’t want a low price.”Brazil earns $5 for each ton of CO2e it reduces through preventing deforestation, according to Arief. Between 2009 and 2016, it earned an average of 925 million krone ($108 million) a year from Norway, with the money channeled to the Amazon Fund, set up by Brazil as part of its initiative to reduce deforestation.Based on that price, Indonesia would receive $24 million from Norway for its 2017 efforts — a valuation that Ruandha called “very low.”Another missing piece of the puzzle is the lack of official funding mechanism in Indonesia, akin to Brazil’s Amazon Fund.When BP REDD+ was still in charge, it worked on a funding scheme called Financing REDD+ in Indonesia (FREDDI). Its purpose was to distribute financial assistance via grants, investments and trade intermediaries. But the scheme was scrapped along with BP REDD+. In its place, the government moved to establish a new funding instrument that would underwrite all environmental initiatives, not just those under REDD+.The office of Indonesia’s coordinating minister for the economy plans to establish the new funding instrument, known by its Indonesian acronym, BLU, sometime this year.The existing funding instrument under the forestry ministry will be integrated into the new BLU, according to Siti, the minister.“It’s not easy [to establish the BLU], but we’re currently trying to find a model that’s the easiest for us,” she said.As both countries work on the details of the payout, environmentalists have urged Indonesia not to get sidetracked by the money and to focus on tackling addressing the litany of tasks needed to improve its forest governance.Anggalia Putri Permatasari, a researcher at the NGO Madani Foundation for Sustainability, said the spirit of REDD+ and the bilateral partnership wasn’t meant to be financial. “[The money] is an incentive to mobilize actions [to reduce deforestation],” she said.Through the deal, REDD+ is expected to serve as an entry point for a slew of improvements to land and forest management, including good governance, transparency, and anti-corruption measures, Anggalia said. She said lack of transparency still dogged Indonesia’s forest management, citing the land ministry’s decision to withhold data on right-to-cultivate permits for plantation and farming businesses, known as HGU permits.Each HGU permit includes details such as land boundaries, coordinates and the area of the concession, as well as the leaseholder’s name. The HGU documents are vital because withholding them enables land-grabbing, with companies often laying claim to community lands without having to show their concession maps.Arief said that while Indonesia had implemented a number of critical reforms and actions in the forestry sector over the last few years, including a ban on destroying primary forests and peatlands, and increased law enforcement action against forest crimes, there were still some areas rich in rainforests at risk of deforestation, such as the easternmost region of Papua.“Law enforcement has to be strengthened because we’re seeing a serious threat against rainforests in Papua and West Papua provinces,” Arief said. “Recently, more than 300 containers of illegally logged timber from Papua were confiscated. There’s also ongoing forest clearing in Boven Digoel district. Land clearing due to palm oil expansion has also intensified in Teluk Bintuni district.”A clouded leopard in Kalimantan. Photo by Spencer Wright/Wikimedia CommonsFluctuating by the yearArief said Indonesia could stand to learn from Brazil’s experience in its REDD+ deal with Norway, including the importance of being consistent in efforts to reduce deforestation.In 2017, he said, Norway’s rainforest payment to Brazil was dropped to 350 million krone ($41 million) as a result of increased deforestation in the Amazon the previous year.“This means that all efforts to reduce deforestation and forest degradation must continue,” Arief said. “Since the largest amount of [Indonesia’s] emissions come from forest fires and deforestation, the government needs to make sure there are no more fires if they want to keep getting paid.”During the particularly dire dry season of 2015, forest fires in Indonesia raged so intensely that they generated huge clouds of toxic smog that spread as far as Singapore and Malaysia, sparking a diplomatic spat. In Indonesia alone, the smoke sickened half a million people, according to government figures.The 2015 fires razed 26,000 square kilometers (10,038 square miles) of land across Indonesia, but since then the problem largely abated. In 2017, the area burned was just 6 percent of the 2015 total, allowing Indonesia to claim an emissions reduction of 24.4 percent from the business-as-usual scenario.In 2018, however, there was a significant uptick of forest fires, with 5,100 square kilometers (1,970 square miles) of land scorched — three times the size of area burned in 2017 — thanks to a more intense dry season than in the previous two years.Fires in peat forests alone in 2016 emitted 96.7 million tons of CO2, according to government figures. The final figure for 2018, not yet published, is expected to far exceed that, given that peat fire emissions in the first eight months of the year already hit 76 million tons.Crucially, emission reductions from peat degradation and peat fires aren’t included in Indoensia’s REDD+ deal with Norway. But they are expected to be included in the accounting mechanism as estimates improve.“The 2018 fires were quite bad and so our emissions reduction will decrease again,” Ruandha said. “But we still have until 2030″ to meet a target of cutting emissions by 29 percent from business-as-usual projections.“The point is that if we can prevent fires from breaking out, and manage our peat forests well, then our climate target will be met.” Biodiversity, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Finance, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forestry, Illegal Logging, Palm Oil, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Biodiversity, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation Banner image: A coast in Nechiebe village of Ravenirara district, Papua province. Image by Christopel Paino/Mongabay-Indonesia. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

Madagascar mine ignites protests, community division

first_imgAn Australian mining company, Base Resources, plans to break ground soon on a mineral sands mining project in southwestern Madagascar.Base Resources says the project represents a development opportunity for the region. It has the support of most government officials and local mayors.But local opposition groups have called for an end to the project, citing the negative environmental impact it could have and insisting that it’s been made possible only through corrupt land deals.The battle over the project has played out in the Malagasy media for several years and is reaching a fever pitch as the project nears fruition. In the latest development, a Madagascar court released nine community members held for six weeks on accusations of participating in the destruction of Base Resources’ exploration campsite. FIANARANTSOA, Madagascar — Last month, a Madagascar court ended a six-week saga for people in the southwestern village of Benetse, near the city of Toliara. Nine members of the community had been detained without trial for several weeks following an act of civil disobedience against an Australian mining company, Base Resources, that plans to break ground soon on a mineral sands project in the area.Their friends and family in Benetse went to great lengths, literally, to support the nine after they were detained. In late May, more than a dozen villagers traveled for the first time to Fianarantsoa, a city hundreds of miles away on the country’s high plateau. But they weren’t able to enjoy the red gullied landscape of the highlands, so unlike the spiny forests and baobob trees back home in the dry, flat southwest. They were in Fianarantsoa to see their loved ones — small-scale farmers who had lately become known as the “Toliara 9” — stand trial.Emma Vazonandrasana and others in a bush taxi on the way home to the village of Benetse. They’d gone to Fianarantsoa, a city in the country’s central highlands, to support nine friends and family members who’d been detained for their alleged role in the destruction of Base Resources’s property. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.The nine men were apparently part of a group of around 40 community members that burned and vandalized Base Resources’ exploration campsite in April. In early May, authorities arrested the nine, charged them with arson, destruction of property, and forming a mob, and transferred them to prison in Fianarantsoa. They were scheduled to go before a judge on May 24, but at the last moment the trial was postponed for two weeks.“We are disappointed,” Emma Vazonandrasana, who was among those who made the 12-hour taxi-bus trip to Fianarantsoa, and whose brother and father were among the nine, told Mongabay the next day. “We spent so much time and money to be there. We are tired, tired of worrying, tired of the travel. We thought they would be released today.”However, Vazonandrasana’s side received welcome news on June 13, when the nine men were released. They were convicted of unarmed gathering without permission and given six-month prison sentences, but the sentences were suspended. The court gave the nine the benefit of the doubt with regard to arson and destruction of property.Civil society groups in Madagascar rejoiced at the verdict, even if they deemed the conviction and suspended sentence unfair. “It’s nice to see that this system works from time to time!” Ketakandriana Rafitoson, executive director of Transparency International Initiative Madagascar, wrote in response to an emailed communiqué from civil society groups that Mongabay received.The battle over the mineral sands project has played out in the Malagasy media for several years and is reaching a fever pitch as the project nears fruition. Base Resources plans to start construction this year and says the project represents a development opportunity for the region. It has the support of most government officials and local mayors. The company calls its deposit near Toliara “world class” and has indicated, in a televised interview, that it will have the highest profit margins of any mineral sands project in the world. But opposition groups based in Toliara, Benetse and nearby villages have called for an end to the project, citing the negative environmental impact it could have and insisting that it’s been made possible only through corrupt land deals.The prison in Fianarantsoa where the “Toliara 9” were held from early May until June 13. The prosecutor denied Mongabay access to the nine men while they were detained, saying that such visits weren’t allowed before the trial. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Demand for whitenessThe ultimate cause of the controversy is consumer demand for whiteness. Ilmenite, the main mineral in the deposit, yields titanium dioxide, which helps make paint, toothpaste and sunscreen white. The deposit also contains exploitable levels of rutile and zircon, which have similar uses as pigments. Another large mineral sands project, run by a subsidiary of London-based mining giant Rio Tinto, has been operating in Madagascar for about a decade, and has also faced opposition and scrutiny from local groups.Though mineral sands deposits exist in coastal areas the world over, they are most often exploited in the developing world, where environmental regulations are lax or difficult to enforce, Steven Emerman, a Utah-based geophysicist and consultant who has studied Rio Tinto’s Madagascar project, told Mongabay. (Australia, where mineral sands projects are better regulated, might be considered an exception.)One of the risks of mineral sands mining is exposure of both workers and the public to uranium and thorium, both radioactive metals. Uranium and thorium can get into local water supplies or be inhaled as dust. Thorium levels are especially high at the proposed mining site near Toliara, and “serious radioprotection measures” will be required to make the project safe, a 2014 study by chemists at the University of Antananarivo found. The zircon at the Toliara deposit is so high in uranium and thorium that Base Resources will not be able to sell it in the United States, Japan or the European Union, which will treat it as radioactive waste.“Who are they planning on selling this radioactive zircon to?” Emerman asked.Base Resources declined to share its environmental and social impact assessment with Mongabay. “The ESIA summary is currently very extensive and we do not currently have a shortened version for distribution,” Jean Bruno Ramahefarivo, the  company’s general manager for external affairs in Madagascar, said in a written statement to Mongabay. The statement was part of a long email exchange with company representatives, who did not respond to requests for clarification as to why the length of the impact assessment prevented it from being shared publicly.Base Resources is a small company compared to the likes of Rio Tinto. It made its name developing the Kwale mineral sands project in southern Kenya over the last decade. Looking for a second project, the company acquired Base Toliara, as its local subsidiary is now known, in January 2018. The company expects to create more than 850 permanent jobs, almost all for Malagasy nationals, and to pay the Madagascar government about $28 million in taxes and royalties each year from 2022 to 2054. There would also be knock-on employment and tax benefits as local suppliers did business with Base Toliara.The village of Tsianisiha, west of the proposed mining site. The population is divided about the project. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Base Toliara plans to use a “dry mining” technique. After removing the vegetation and stripping the topsoil, the company will excavate the sand to 20 meters (66 feet) below the surface. Bulldozers will push sand into “dozer mining units” that mix it with water, forming a slurry that will then be pumped to a plant where heavy mineral concentrate — the useful bit, making up about 6 percent of the original sand — is pulled out. This concentrate will be piped to a second plant and separated into ilmenite, rutile and zircon. The minerals will then be trucked via a private road to a small shipping terminal in Toliara.Plans for the road and terminal are particularly controversial. The road, exclusively for use by company vehicles, would cut through pastoral land and divide some farmers from the land they work, although the communities are being consulted on where crossing points can be built. The terminal would be built on Andaboy Beach, which many local people consider sacred. The site of spiritual rites, it is sometimes littered with coins, and there are taboos about eating pork before going there. Large crowds gather around Andaboy on holidays such as Easter, and local fishers use it as a base of operations.A group called Zanadriake (meaning “Children of the sea”) has opposed the terminal construction plans for many years. A middle-aged member named Gano told Mongabay that he was proud to have earned his living as a Vezo — an ethnic identification associated with living off the sea. He has been a fisher and sea-cucumber diver for 37 years, earning enough to send his children to school. Like others in the group, he said he regards any agreement to lease the land at Andaboy to a foreign company as a betrayal of Vezo tradition, and one that will only benefit white-collar workers.“If Base Toliara occupies it for its mineral sands project, where will we earn our living from?” Gano asked. “Are we not human beings? They at Base Toliara have skills, so they are human beings. But we that do not have skills, we are not [treated like] human beings.”Base Toliara told Mongabay that its terminal will take up only 2 hectares (5 acres) of a large beach area, and that the jetty will be high enough for pirogues to sail under, between the pillars. The company plans to build an artificial reef to increase the catch for local fishers.Gano (in red cap), a member of Zanadriake, an organization of fishers and divers that opposes Base Resources’s plan to build a small port at the beach near Toliara, looks on as his friend Gentsy shows a video of the beach during a crowded holiday. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Fears of displacementDemonstrations against the project have become commonplace in recent years. The leading faces of the opposition are Théo Rakotovao, a well-known Malagasy musician who comes from the region and has sung about the mining controversy, and Siteny Randrianasoloniaiko, a member of parliament from a neighboring area who has given rousing speeches about the mine. They have led protests at the beach and in the streets over the past two years. Representatives of community opposition groups have also traveled to the capital Antananarivo to register their discontent with the central government.In addition to concerns over environmental impact, the protests are about land rights, including cultural and economic displacement. The first thing many local people point out is that there are tombs on the land (91 of them, according to Base Toliara). The company says the families have agreed to have the tombs moved and will be given three zebu cattle as compensation, in line with Malagasy tradition.Twenty households live on the deposit itself, some of whose members work for the company and have agreed to move. However, the project will impact the livelihoods of many more people who farm and raise animals on that land. The company acknowledges this “resource utilization” and says it will compensate them for the loss, probably by the end of July, in accordance with Madagascar law and International Finance Corporation Performance Standard 5, which deals with involuntary resettlement.As a foreign-owned company, Base Toliara can’t own land; it must lease it from the national government. The government is currently in the process of buying or otherwise taking possession of the necessary land. This creates conflict because many local people don’t have formal deeds to the land they live on, let alone the land they farm or graze their animals on. Even without deeds, they have land rights under Madagascar law, but in practice these are not always honored.Even if a company such as Base Toliara does everything above board, the lack of transparent governance in Madagascar can open the door for unscrupulous mayors and regional officials to abuse their power. They decide who owns untitled land — land that has suddenly become very valuable — and this can create a great deal of resentment among community members.Manantsoa Ratsimaro, a Mazoto supporter and 61-year-old farmer in the village of Tsianisiha, stands outside his house next to campaign material for President Andry Rajoelina. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.A people divided The mayors of the five affected communes, each containing many villages, support Base Toliara. Jean Manantena Mahatokisa, the mayor of Tsianisiha, told Mongabay the mining project will bring jobs and progress as he fixed the ink cartridge on an old typewriter in his office. Although he was mildly critical of the company’s communication strategy, he said he’d seen no corruption, and he claimed that 95 percent of his constituents supported the project.The mayor’s math seemed well off the mark. Many residents of Tsianisiha and the other communes adamantly oppose the mining project. Most people stopped at random by Mongabay proudly declared their affiliation with the main opposition group, Mazoto (meaning “motivated” or “eager”).Manantsoa Ratsimaro, a Mazoto supporter and 61-year-old farmer in Tsianisiha, called the mayors of the five communes “traitors.” Standing near his thatch-roofed house, he pointed out the plums, cassavas and twining plants growing in his yard. “I’ll never agree to let Base Toliara exploit my land because my descendants need to live off of it,” he told Mongabay. “Without the land, they will suffer. They did not finish school. I will not accept the project even in exchange for a billion ariary [around $275,000]. I would spend that money quickly and it wouldn’t have any effect on my descendants. However, things that we eat here are abundant and will last even after I’m gone. [My descendants] can grow old with them.”Manantsoa Ratsimaro sits outside his house with his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. “I’ll never agree to let Base Toliara exploit my land because my descendants need to live off it,” he said. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.However, there is debate about what people such as Ratsimaro can legitimately call their land, and there is a current of local support for the mining project. Some people, especially those with more schooling, are excited by the job opportunities it presents. “Young people will work for them [Base Toliara]. Older people will work for them,” Alexis, a resident of Ranobe, a village near the proposed mining site and the father of several children, told Mongabay. “This will put an end to crime because criminals will find jobs. Robberies result from hunger and poverty. If Base Toliara comes to life, robbery and poverty will be no more, and the area will develop.”Some villagers told Mongabay that they think of Base Toliara in the same way they think of charities that have worked in the area. The company has already spent $400,000 on social projects, such as the construction of three deep wells. If exploitation commences, Base Toliara will be required by Madagascar law to spend $500,000 annually on social projects; the company says it plans to go beyond that and spend at least $1 million to $2 million.Alexis, a resident of Ranobe, one of the villages closest to the proposed mining site, supports the project, mainly for the jobs it will create and the security this will provide. “Robberies result from hunger and poverty. If Base Toliara comes to life, robbery and poverty will be no more, and the area will develop.” Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Madagascar’s mining minister visited the Base Toliara concession area in March and said he would report on the issue to President Andry Rajoelina, who has remained silent on the project but tends to support the extractive industries. The president’s communications team declined to comment for this article. Madagascar’s mining ministry did not respond to requests for comment.Base Toliara’s exploitation permit is of questionable validity. The Madagascar government that issued the 40-year permit in 2012 may not have had the authority to do so. It was a “transition” government led by Rajoelina, who had come to power following a 2009 coup d’état. Rajoelina is now the country’s legitimate president, having won the 2018 election, but his earlier administration had, under international pressure, agreed not to make such far-reaching deals. “The Transitional Government shall be responsible for administering the day-to-day affairs of the country…It will refrain from making new long-term commitments,” reads the Roadmap for Ending the Crisis in Madagascar signed by Rajoelina in September 2011, which became Malagasy law later that year. (It was Rajoelina’s signing of this agreement that allowed him to receive some official recognition by the United Nations, which had previously shunned him.) When Mongabay questioned Base Resources about this issue in an email, Ramahefarivo replied: “The exploitation permit was acquired by the previous owners and is considered valid.”Base Toliara has exploration rights — but not exploitation permits — at three other large concessions in southwest Madagascar. Few people in the region seem to know about these. Base Resources representatives told Mongabay that it has done no research in those three areas and does not know if Malagasy people live there. However, an anthropologist who works in the region told Mongabay that the sites are “absolutely” inhabited; that there are a number of villages and hamlets in and around the concessions, including many that are visible on maps; that the concession areas are important for rice production; and that it was puzzling that Base Resources would deny knowing that.Gano (in red cap) and other members of Zanadriake look at a map of Base Resources’s concessions in the region. One man points at the blue dot that represents Toliara, the city where many of the group’s members live, and where the company is planning to build a small port that they object to. The company plans to begin construction on the concession nearest to Toliara this year. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Banditry or protest?Ramahefarivo referred to the people who burned the company’s campsite as “bandits” in an email to Mongabay, and he told a Malagasy journalist that the idea that the Toliara 9 were defending their rights was a “pure lie”. However, the event was orchestrated in the manner of civil disobedience. About 40 protesters took action together, both men and women, in the light of day. They did not injure anyone; they invited television crews, who recorded the event; and they vandalized property, including samples of ilmenite and zircon, directly in front of gendarmes, who were also filming.The people of Benetse did not feel anyone should be imprisoned for the action. “They are innocent people who protected the tanindraza [the land of the ancestors]” Emma Vazonandrasana, the young woman who tried to see the trial in Fianarantsoa, said of the nine who were arrested, using the Malagasy word for one’s family or community land.Children in a coastal village west of Base Resource’s main mining concession stand near a campaign poster for Théo Rakotovao, a musician who opposes the mining project. Rakotovao ran unsuccessfully for parliament in May. “I entered into politics in order to protect people,” he said. Image by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Even with the Toliara 9 now free, the controversy surrounding the project is likely to continue. The company hopes to ship the first ilmenite in 2021. Opposition groups such as Mazoto have no clear-cut plan to stop the project and seem to be running out of time, but are hoping that their determination will somehow pay off.“If the people don’t agree, the mining company should go home,” said Rakotovao, the musician and opposition leader. “They can exploit mineral sands in Australia.”last_img read more

Saving Guatemala’s vanishing macaws: Q&A with veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Animals, Birds, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Endangered, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Loss, Parrots, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The northern subspecies of the scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) has disappeared from much of its former range in Mexico and Central America due to habitat loss and wildlife trafficking. Researchers estimate there are between 150 and 200 scarlet macaws remaining in Guatemala.Fire, used to clear land for agriculture, is the biggest driver of habitat loss in Guatemala. So far this year, NASA satellites have detected more than 40,000 fires in Guatemala, many occurring in scarlet macaw habitat.The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) is trying to protect Guatemala’s macaws through a program that monitors nest sites and places lab-hatched chicks in adoptive nests.Mongabay caught up with WCS Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra as he was working in the field in Laguna del Tigre National Park to chat about his work and the outlook for scarlet macaws. Laguna del Tigre National Park sits in the northwest corner of Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve, encompassing about 3,367 square kilometers (1,300 square miles) of jungle, lagoons and ancient ruins. But it is also the site of some of the country’s worst deforestation, losing around 30 percent of its forest cover between 2001 and 2018, according to satellite data collated by the University of Maryland. Just since May, around 60,000 deforestation alerts have been recorded in the national park and more than 180,000 in the reserve.Impoverished rural communities, often with no land of their own, set fire to the jungle in hopes of establishing farms and cattle ranches. Officials in the park say many cattle ranches are also a front for cocaine traffickers, who need large swaths of hidden space to land planes arriving from Colombia and Venezuela. So far this year, NASA satellites have detected more than 40,000 fires in Guatemala, with more recorded in Laguna del Tigre’s municipality of San Andres than in any other municipality in the country. And the vast majority of San Andres fires are happening in the national park.Researchers say the fires spreading across Laguna del Tigre and other parts of the biosphere reserve are having a direct impact on the area’s biodiversity, most notably for the northern subspecies of the scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera). The bird once occupied southern Mexico, as well as Honduras and El Salvador, but its habitat has shrunk significantly. In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its intention to list the subspecies under the Endangered Species Act.All of Guatemala’s scarlet macaws—estimated at 150-200 individuals—now reside within the reserve. But due to the ongoing fires even this small area is under threat. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) is working to recuperate the population through nest observation and laboratory incubation.In May, Mongabay visited the WCS lab at its campsite near the ancient Mayan city of Perú-Waka’ to talk about the fires’ effects on scarlet macaw habitat. There, Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra was finishing up a long day of monitoring macaw chicks in the lab, as well as visiting to nests located high in the canopies of Cantemo trees where full grown birds were flying back and forth in search of food.Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra observes a scarlet macaw in the Laguna del Tigre National Park laboratory. Photo courtesy of WCS.Mongabay: Earlier this morning, we visited a scarlet macaw nest less than a mile from camp. The most striking thing about it for me was how close the damage of a recent forest fire had come to the Cantemo tree it chose for its nest—only about thirty feet away. Luis Fernando Guerra: The fires are destroying the primary forest and the regeneration of those forests. Replacing a tree of that size takes years. That’s a problem because scarlet macaws won’t have anywhere else to nest.Mongabay: Losing nests to forest fires appears to be a common occurrence in Laguna del Tigre. Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, it has happened. And in fact that’s why the macaw is such an important species for conservation—because it’s not just conserving those large trees; you also have to conserve a large amount of the surrounding forest and that can help preserve additional species.Satellite data from the University of Maryland picked up more than 60,000 deforestation alerts in Laguna del Tigre National Park between May and June 19 this year. Around 1,000 occurred within about five miles of a monitored scarlet macaw nest site. Source: GLAD/UMD and VIIRS Active Fires, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Mongabay: If we lose all of the Cantemo trees, could the scarlet macaws live in other kinds?Luis Fernando Guerra: Here in Guatemala, about 80 percent of them use those trees. Yes, they can use other trees but they do have their preference.The loss of habitat caused by fires is a big threat to the scarlet macaw population. That nest you visited is a very good nest. It’s active every year. If the fire had taken it, it would have been a great loss because it’s a nest that is active year after year. We always get the chicks to fly from there. It’s very easy to monitor because it’s so close, too.Mongabay: What strategies are WCS taking to help bolster the scarlet macaw population?Luis Fernando Guerra: The idea for ​​us is to work with the populations on-site—which is here in the jungle—and to get more chicks to fly. Normally the macaws put three to four eggs in each nest but not at the same time. The third chick sometimes dies because the macaws are feeding the two older ones, and the smaller one almost never gets food. We’ve started to work a little on species management. We take the third bird, feed it in this laboratory over here and then we look for an adoptive nest, other nests where maybe there is only one chick, of about the same age, and we place the chick there.Wildlife Conservation Society Technician Antonio Xol working with a scarlet macaw chick in the Laguna del Tigre National Park laboratory. Photo courtesy of WCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: But does the mother always accept the new chick? Luis Fernando Guerra: They almost always accept them. We haven’t had problems with them not accepting a chick, or with the macaw not wanting to return to the nest due to human presence. They are a very manageable species.The nesting season starts more or less at the end of January until the end of August, which is when the last chicks finish flying. Then … the nests are checked, the nests are cleaned, some nests are occupied by bees, which is reported. We manage about 90 to 100 nests and then we only work with the active nests. An active nest is one where the macaw lives and lays eggs.In the end, there are an average of about 25 to 30 active nests per season. The idea is that the same number of birds fly each year—keeping it one to one, one chick per nest. That is a good reproduction index for us.Mongabay: Have you seen long-term improvement in their population?Luis Fernando Guerra: There are good and bad years. For example, there are years when the climate is very bad, so the following year, there is little available food and the macaws feed less and have less chicks. But we have seen that with the help of the monitoring we have done, many times we have managed to keep it one to one. So, basically, that’s what we work for.A Scarlet Macaw pokes its head out of its nest in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy ofWCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: We can’t talk about threats to the scarlet macaw without at least mentioning illegal trafficking. Luckily, it appears that the trend has declined in recent years. Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, now it’s very complicated to traffic scarlet macaws. There is a lot of surveillance. But there are areas that we sometimes don’t have access to and that many local community members know well…Obviously there is a lot of trafficking of parrots, not only of macaws, which are both wanted as pets. Most of the market is in Guatemala City, where people want pets. And as long as that market exists, there will always be illegal trafficking.Mongabay: Do you have concerns about the state of the scarlet macaw habitat in areas of the Maya Biosphere Reserve most affected by fires, such as Laguna del Tigre National Park?Luis Fernando Guerra: The importance of the Laguna del Tigre National Park is immense. There is great biodiversity here and the Maya Biosphere Reserve is one of the biggest stretches of forests in Meso-america. I think it’s very important that you fight for its conservation.If the threats continue, they will spread throughout the reserve and cause problems because we are going to lose the biodiversity that exists in Guatemala—plants, animals, all kinds of animals. It is important that people know that all this is here, that this exists. Because many times, people in Guatemala City ask me, “And are there still jaguars? Are there still macaws?” They think there’s nothing left!Wildlife Conservation Society Technician Pedro Díaz checks on a Scarlet Macaw nest in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy ofWCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: So many people think the battle has already been lost? Luis Fernando Guerra: Exactly. That’s why it’s important to understand the situation, right? Because people usually say, “Oh, how sad about the fires and all that.” And they believe that everything is lost. But that is only a part of the story.Mongabay: Despite those outside perceptions, do you have hope that attempts to save the scarlet macaw will be successful in years to come?Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, as long as this forest and possibilities to reproduce and have food exist, yes, the macaw has hope.–Banner image: A scarlet macaw returns to its nest high in a Cantemo Tree in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy of WCS/Estuardo Maldonado.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Yanomami Amazon reserve invaded by 20,000 miners; Bolsonaro fails to act

first_imgAn estimated 20,000 illegal goldminers (garimpeiros) have entered Yanomami Park, one of Brazil’s biggest indigenous reserves, located in Roraima and Amazonas states, near the border with Venezuela.The miners are well funded, likely by entrepreneurs, who pay workers and provide them with earthmoving equipment, supplies and airplanes. Three illegal air strips and three open-pit goldmines are in operation within the Yanomami indigenous territory.Indigenous leaders blame President Bolsonaro, with his incendiary anti-indigenous language, and his administration, with its policies that have defunded and gutted agencies responsible for law enforcement in the Amazon.Bolsonaro claims indigenous people want mining and industrial agribusiness on their lands, but the Yanomami vehemently deny such desires. They say they want self-determination over the types of businesses on their lands. One such new, sustainable business is a chocolate concession that would preserve the rainforest and offer income. Land within Yanomami Park cleared of rainforest and occupied by the garimpeiros, illegal miners. Image courtesy of ISA.Thousands of goldminers (garimpeiros) have illegally invaded Yanomami Park, one of Brazil’s largest indigenous territories, officially demarcated by the Brazilian government in 1992, and covering 96,650 square kilometres (37,320 square miles) of rainforest in the states of Roraima and Amazonas, near the border with Venezuela.An incursion of this scale has not occurred for many years, bringing back memories among indigenous elders of the terrible period in the late 1980s, when some 40,000 goldminers moved onto their land and about a fifth of the indigenous population died in just seven years due to violence, malaria, malnutrition, mercury poisoning and other causes.Davi Kopenawa, a Yanomami leader, estimates that some 20,000 miners are now on indigenous land. While the public perception of such operations is that they are artisanal or small-scale, they are typically sophisticated operations. The current crop of miners are likely underlings, well-funded and backed by well-to-do entrepreneurs who pay the miners or give them a share of production, while also supplying the workers with leased dredges, earth movers, and other heavy equipment, along with airplanes to fly in supplies and fly out the gold.The miners are polluting the reserve’s rivers with mercury and silt, eroding the river banks, cutting down forest, scaring away the animals that the Indians hunt, and destroying fisheries, while inciting indigenous women into prostitution. Both the Mucajaí and Uraricoera rivers have become so polluted that people living in Boa Vista, the capital of Roraima state, located 570 kilometers (354 miles) downstream, have complained about the deteriorating water quality in their river, the Rio Branco, which is formed by the confluence of these two tributaries.Traditional Yanomami face painting. The Yanomami were decimated by a previous mining invasion in the late 1980s when many died. Elders fear that this new invasion will have similar devastating impacts. Image by Fabio Rodrigues Pozzebom / Agência Brasil.“They are only bringing problems. Malaria is increasing. It’s already killed four children in the Marari region,” Kopenawa said. Malaria is spread by mosquitoes, and mining creates large stagnant pools of water, perfect for breeding the insects.The reserve’s isolated, sometimes uncontacted, indigenous peoples are also threatened with potential devastating impacts, as the miners might infect them with Western diseases for which they have no resistance, and that are often fatal. Three illegal landing strips and three open-pit mines have been cut out of the rainforest where isolated indigenous groups have been seen.“There are a lot of isolated Indians. I haven’t met them but I know they will be suffering.” Kopenawa said. “I want to help my relatives. It is very important that they are left unmolested to live on their land.”Júlio Ye’kuhana, from the Seduume Association and a representative of the Ye’kwana, a smaller indigenous group that lives alongside the Yanomami, told how one of the indigenous leaders had asked the miners to leave. But, said Ye’kuhana, the invaders responded angrily: “They’ve been making violent threats against him ever since. So now his community is keeping its head down. The miners are all armed with pistols and shotguns.”A mining camp within Yanomami territory. The indigenous group says that Bolsonaro’s anti-indigenous rhetoric and the administration’s lax enforcement policies have emboldened the illegal miners to be more aggressive and threatening. Image courtesy of ISA.The army departs, enter the minersUntil recently, the Brazilian army had two monitoring bases along the Park’s largest rivers, the Mucajaí and Uraricoera, both used by miners as entry routes. Although the Yanomami complained that the army did not do enough to keep miners out, the very existence of these bases deterred some invaders. But at the end of last year, the army closed these bases, saying that its resources were overstretched by the tens-of-thousands of refugees flooding into Brazil from Venezuela.With the army gone, the miners took advantage, swarming unimpeded into Yanomami Park.Possibly emboldened by Jair Bolsonaro’s anti-indigenous policies and the administration’s major budget reductions for Amazon law enforcement operations, the miners have even dared to set up a village within the Park in a region called Tatuzão do Mutum.The Yanomami believe that, even before his election, Bolsonaro encouraged the invasion by talking about his father’s experience as a goldminer and repeatedly saying that indigenous groups had too much land. Then on 17 April, in a live interview on Facebook the President, accompanied by a few Yanomami Indians, announced that large-scale mining and extensive monoculture — meaning industrial agribusiness — should be allowed on indigenous territory, including Yanomami Park.“Indians should not continue to be poor living above rich land. In Roraima, there are trillions of reais [Brazilian currency] under their land, [in the form of mineral wealth],” Bolsonaro said.The Yanomami respond in opposition to Bolsonaro administration indigenous policies. Image courtesy of ISA.The Yanomami leadership, clearly alarmed by the President’s statement, reacted quickly. On 18 April a group of Yanomami leaders posted a video in which they vehemently asserted, in both Yanomami and Portuguese, that the Yanomami that had appeared at Bolsonaro’s side were not representative of any community within their reserve, and had no authority to speak for them.One after another the leaders declared their total opposition to mining or commercial farming on their land. “You [Bolsonaro] say that we are going hungry,” said Kopenawa. “But it is a lie. None of us, Yanomami, are going hungry.”“Gold should remain under the ground,” declared Roberval, a member of Ayrca, Maturacá Terra Yanomami, an indigenous organization. “We want a better income, but with our own projects.” The leaders sent a letter to Bolsonaro, expressing their outrage.César de Mendes, a small-scale manufacturer who specializes in Amazon chocolates, helps the Yanomami toast cacao seeds in the chocolate making process. Image courtesy of ISA.The sweet promise of helpThough the government has not responded to that letter, the federal indigenous agency, FUNAI, has said that it will be re-opening bases in Yanomami territory closed because of budget cuts. It stated in May: “One of the bases will be reopened in three months’ time and by 2020 all of them will be fully functioning again, employing Indians and FUNAI staff and collaborating with employees from other state institutions.”But indigenous communities haven’t stood idle waiting for government assistance. One innovative economic initiative is very new — chocolate making. The enterprise got underway in an indigenous village located just a few miles away from Tatuzão do Mutum, so-called because the big open-pit mine created there by about a thousand miners resembles the shell of a tatuzão, a giant armadillo.Some Ye’kwana leaders realized that the standing forest offered another form of “gold” —cacao. Although cacao is endemic to the region, indigenous people have traditionally consumed the sweet flesh in the large orange cacao pods and thrown away the seeds, from which chocolate is made. Once they became aware of the market potential of high-quality connoisseur chocolate, they set about developing their own delectable brand.In July 2018, Ye’kwana and Yanomami leaders organized a workshop, involving one Ye’kwana and 13 Yanomami communities. With the support of the Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA), an NGO, they brought in chocolate makers to advise on how best to collect the seeds, process them and make chocolate. One visitor was César de Mendes, a small-scale manufacturer who specializes in Amazon chocolates. He was delighted to discover two varieties of cacao in the Park, one of which was completely new to him. He believes that the Indians may be able to launch a novel brand, with its own distinctive flavor. At the end of the 10-day workshop, indigenous participants produced their first ever bar of chocolate, and celebrated with a triumphant, intercommunity party. Regular production is expected to begin this year.The additional income their high-end chocolate provides will be very welcome in indigenous villages. Because the miners have polluted local rivers, many people are now being forced to develop artesian wells, which can cost money to construct. Also, young Indians are keen to buy mobile phones and trainers, so are tempted away by the money offered by miners. For those and other reasons, chocolate-making may well prove a lifeline for indigenous communities while also giving consumers across Brazil, and elsewhere, a chance to buy a delicious product that helps conserve the Amazon forest.But the threat of encroaching mining operations still looms, and if not curtailed by law enforcement, will remain a dark shadow hanging over Yanomami lands and hopes.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The first ever bar of chocolate produced by the Yanomami. The indigenous group sees chocolate bars, not gold bars, as one way of achieving economic sustainability without destroying the rainforest. Image courtesy of ISA. Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: David Quammen on ecological restoration, emerging diseases, evolutionary science, and more

first_imgIn a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique — once touted by none other than E.O. Wilson himself, in an interview with Mongabay, as a place where successful restoration efforts were underway and benefitting nature, wildlife, and humans.Another recent focus of Quammen’s work has been emerging diseases — his 2014 book Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, for instance, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases, especially viral diseases like ebola. That made his appearance on the Newscast particularly well-timed, because the day before taping the interview, the World Health Organization announced that an ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become a global health emergency, only the fifth time the WHO has ever made such a declaration.Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted.Here’s this episode’s top news:From over 100,000 species assessments in IUCN update, zero improvementsJune 2019 was the hottest on record: NOAAU.S. Virgin Islands bans coral-damaging sunscreensWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.The lion population in Gorongosa National Park is on the rebound thanks to the Gorongosa Restoration Project. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.In a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. His 2014 book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases. Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted. Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.Listen here: Books, Diseases, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Evolution, Interviews, Interviews With Environmental Journalists, Journalism, National Parks, Podcast, Protected Areas, Restoration, Science last_img read more

Newly described pocket shark likely glows in the dark

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Deep Sea, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, New Species, Oceans, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Researchers have described a new species of pocket shark, a small shark measuring just 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) long, that possibly glows in the dark.The shark has been named the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama mississippiensis, in recognition of the biologically rich region in which it was discovered.Only two pocket sharks have ever been caught from the ocean. The previous specimen, M. parini, was collected from the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1979.The discovery of a new pocket shark species shows there is much more to learn about the Gulf of Mexico, researchers say. In 2010, researchers surveying the eastern Gulf of Mexico to study what sperm whales eat, collected numerous animals from the ocean’s depths. While examining the collection in 2013, Mark Grace of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) discovered a small shark among the specimens, measuring just 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) in length.Now, Grace and his colleagues have identified that shark as a new-to-science species, one that possibly glows in the dark. The newly described animal is a species of pocket shark, researchers say in a new study published in Zootaxa.The pocket shark gets its names not for its small size but because of small pocket-like openings or glands found behind each of its pectoral fins. Grace and his team have named the new species the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama mississippiensis, “in recognition of the vast North American Mississippi River Basin; a biologically and geographically rich region that nurtures Gulf of Mexico fauna and unites diverse cultures,” they write in the paper. The proposed common name recognizes the “extraordinary Americas of the Western Hemisphere.”Pocket sharks are incredibly rare. Before the discovery of the American pocket shark, the only other specimen of pocket shark, archived at the Zoological Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, was collected from the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1979. The species was named M. parini after the Russian ichthyologist Nikolai Vasilevich Parin.The American pocket shark is the second species of pocket shark to be described. While the shark resembles M. parini in general shape and placement of fins and pocket glands, there are several notable differences, the researchers say. The American pocket shark has 10 fewer vertebrae than M. parini, for example, different teeth, a likely pit organ located near its lower jaw, and numerous light-producing organs or photophores covering much of the body, which possibly help the shark luminesce in the deep sea.“In the history of fisheries science, only two pocket sharks have ever been captured or reported,” Grace said in a statement. “Both are separate species, each from separate oceans. Both are exceedingly rare.”Henry Bart, a co-author of the study and director and curator of fishes at Tulane University’s Museum of Natural History, said the discovery of a new pocket shark species showed there was much more to learn about the Gulf of Mexico.“The fact that only one pocket shark has ever been reported from the Gulf of Mexico, and that it is a new species, underscores how little we know about the Gulf — especially its deeper waters — and how many additional new species from these waters await discovery,” he said in the statement.The only known specimen of the American pocket shark was discovered in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Image by Mark Doosey.Citation:Grace, M. A., Doosey, M. H., Denton, J. S., Naylor, G. J., Bart, H. L., & Maisey, J. G. (2019). A new Western North Atlantic Ocean kitefin shark (Squaliformes: Dalatiidae) from the Gulf of Mexico. Zootaxa, 4619(1), 109-120. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4619.1.4last_img read more