Huawei files patent suit against T-Mobile US

first_img HuaweiT-Mobile Español El fundador de Huawei propugna una transición hacia el software Tags Author Previous ArticleEC launches “vital” manifesto for Europe’s 5G driveNext ArticleLG set for big Q2 profit jump but G5 “disappoints” Related AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 08 JUL 2016 center_img Home Huawei files patent suit against T-Mobile US Chinese vendor Huawei filed a lawsuit against T-Mobile US in the US district court for the Eastern District of Texas for using its patented technology without signing a licensing agreement.The lawsuit states that “Huawei brings this action because T-Mobile has refused Huawei’s FRAND [fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory] offer, but continues to practice, use, or otherwise comply with 4G standards covered by Huawei’s 4G Wireless Network Essential Patents by operation of its cellular telecommunications network.”“Huawei was forced to bring four patent infringement actions involving 14 exemplary patents selected from Huawei’s 4G Wireless Network Essential Patents against T-Mobile in this court,” the lawsuit added.The news comes just a day after it was reported that the third largest smartphone maker in the world is seeking CNY80 million ($12 million) in compensation from Samsung for alleged patent violations related to its 4G and terminal display technology.Huawei has filed several patent applications internationally while spending billions of dollars on research and development as part of an expansion strategy.Last year, it was the largest filer of applications under the Patent Cooperation Treaty, The Wall Street Journal said.Back in 2014, T-Mobile filed a lawsuit in the US against Huawei related to phone-testing robots. That suit will go to trial later this year.The battle between the two companies comes despite Huawei being blocked from building networks for tier one US mobile operators due to government security concerns. Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters – creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews…More Read more FCC mulls expanded Huawei, ZTE bans Blog: How is chip shortage affecting US? Saleha Riaz last_img read more

Heavyweights battle

first_imgThe Harvard heavyweight crew scored a three-for-one this past Sunday (May 13) at the 62nd annual Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges (EARC) Sprints. In capturing three gold and a pair of silver medals, Harvard seized the Rowe Cup (given for the best-overall team), reclaimed the Worcester Bowl (given to the winner of the varsity eight event), and won the Ivy League title. Now, all that’s remaining for the Crimson rowers, whose varsity eight contingent remains undefeated on the season, is the big one — the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) National Championships May 30-June 2 in Camden, N.J.Then and there the men’s heavies will look to win their 10th national title up against the top programs from both coasts and the Midwest, including such powerhouses as Wisconsin, which placed second overall at the EARC Sprints. The Crimson last captured the championship in 2005 to close out a three-year streak as best in the country.Sunday’s sprints on Lake Quinsigamond in Worcester, Mass., began auspiciously for Harvard, as all five Crimson boats took first place in the morning heats. Save the second varsity and freshman eight, the Crimson rowers went on to duplicate their first-place showings in afternoon competition. And emphatically so, particularly the varsity eight, which edged Yale by two seconds to set a new course record of 5:27 — 13 seconds ahead of the team’s morning run. The second varsity eight, meanwhile, enjoyed a bit more breathing room against runner-up Georgetown, finishing five seconds ahead of the Hoya squad in a time of 5:44.28. Harvard’s third gold medal came courtesy of the second freshman eight, who beat BU, 5:53.83 to 5:55.18, in the field of six teams.Harvard earned its first silver of the day when Wisconsin took a thriller of a race in the second varsity event, crossing the finish at 5:36.21 to better the Crimson by a single second. The freshman eight, meanwhile, suffered its first defeat of the season placing two seconds behind Brown, which rowed to the finish in 5:39.Harvard’s three gold medals, however, were enough to wrap up the Rowe Cup for the second-straight year (and fifth time since 2002). As an added bonus, all nine members of Harvard’s varsity eight have recently earned first-team All-Ivy League honors. They are cox Jessica Hoy ’07; strokesmen (from stroke to bow) George Kitovitz ’08, Matt McLane ’07, Toby Medaris ’07, Andrew Boston ’07, Henrik Rummel ’09, Joe Medioli ’08, Simon Gawlik ’09; and bowman Simon Kotzeff ’07.last_img read more

June 15, 2013 Letters

first_imgJune 15, 2013 Letters June 15, 2013 Letters Letters Death Penalty I just read this article about the new death penalty bill that went to our governor who will probably sign it as is or send it back to make it even more draconian than it already is. The Republicans in the Legislature, of course, would be happy to do that and then he’ll sign it.Here’s something interesting: Rep. Rehwinkle-Vasilinda’s observation, “Florida has been involved in more exonerations, in other words, has put more people on death row and has been mistaken about it.” True words. Here’s my question: If we have competing interests, namely the lives of individuals convicted of murder versus the interests of the survivors of murder victims in having legal revenge carried out, what is an acceptable margin of error? Is it all right to kill a few innocent people to satisfy our need for revenge (which really is what the death penalty ultimately is)? And you have to love the title of the bill: “The Timely Justice Act.” Justice, of course, means “we’re going to kill this guy, and we’re going to do it sooner rather than later.” It’s all very efficient, isn’t it? It’s interesting that Islamic countries like Iran and Pakistan, along with certain communist countries like China, still have the death penalty, and all of the Western European democracies have done away with it. In other words, those who are further along the social evolutionary scale have taken a more enlightened approach to this issue than those who are still dealing with the same notions of retribution that date back to antiquity. None of the debate that is currently going on in Tallahassee and elsewhere in this otherwise great country speaks well of us as a people. The death penalty doesn’t deter crime. It’s far too expensive and time- consuming. It wastes resources that could be better utilized elsewhere. It needs to be eliminated altogether.    Ernest J. Mullins Kissimmee_______________________Teresa J. Sopp states her objection to the death penalty in the June 1 News. She relies on the societal costs. However, there is a lot of money spent on a lot of things by our governments.The question is whether there is some societal justification for the practice that may warrant the expense of carrying it out.In Genesis 9:6, God told Noah, “Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed; for in the image of God has God made man.” And there are numerous other instances calling for such a law in the Judeo-Christian scriptures.Of course, some would cry foul to make any reference to any religious literature to inform our American policies. However, American statutory and common-law rules are largely based on the Judeo-Christian heritage (at least until recently). Even more importantly, there is nothing wrong with people relying on their religious beliefs when deciding what laws to support, any more than for other people to rely on “humanist” or other principles.Also, the rule of “a life for a life” makes a lot of sense, both philosophically and practically. Philosophically, a person who has no respect for the life of another person has no place to object to a “lack of respect” for his own life. Practically, a realization that the death penalty will be “speedily” imposed cannot help but motivate some who would murder another not to do so. Witness the intense fight to avoid the death penalty by those convicted murderers who push for life imprisonment instead.Finally, of course, we bemoan those instances where someone who really is innocent is found guilty and executed. But it is simply impossible for some mistakes not to be made in any criminal justice system. This is why we have as many safeguards as we do. “Beyond a reasonable doubt.” “Right to counsel.” “Cannot be compelled to testify against oneself.” Etc. Even under Mosaic law, no one could be executed except upon the testimony of at least two witnesses. So, we make every effort we can, but in the end we can’t just let every criminal go free because in some very rare occasions a mistake may be made.Thomas F. Harkins, Jr. Ft. Worth, Texas _________________________Florida has been indeed blessed by divine providence to have the Florida Senate working to speed up our sacred execution protocols.I am sick of hearing about innocent people being killed. We know that thousands will be killed in auto accidents, yet we still make cars. Killing a few innocents is a small price to pay to make the Republican party look tough on crime.The United States Supreme Court has done everything but hold the entire state in contempt for refusing to make death sentences demand a 12-to-0 verdict. Has anybody but me wondered why they keep reversing Florida death sentences?Our Mensa-challenged Legislature puts pandering over killing. If they would just kowtow to the Supremes, we could kill five a week or better one a day. It would take us two years to wipe out death row, but 460 photo-ops would make it all worthwhileCharles B. Tiffany Kissimmee Discipline The Florida Bar has come up with a unique way to take care of its own. What if its own Bar counsel are getting bored, always pursuing the bad guys?  What if they could switch over to represent us defendants?   Wouldn’t that be a trip? All that has to be done is to generate prospective clients.For just such purposes, apparently, the Bar seems to go through its roster and find just enough solo practitioners and lawyers in small firms to pursue through the disciplinary process. Since 1996, I have been picked on at least 14 times. A dozen times the Bar has come up empty. But now if I could hire one of their own and prevailed, at least the organization would know that I did not have a fool for a lawyer.In the past I did not understand why the Bar seemed to want to spend so much time with me (in truth, they never turned the same Bar counsel loose on me twice.) Now I have a better idea since I started looking at the News more closely. I have a better understanding of this cottage industry The Florida Bar has built.No less than 25 percent of the two pages devoted to the Attorneys Exchange were filled with nine purveyors of credentials under the heading “Attorney Discipline & Bar Admission Professional Licensing Ethics Opinion.” Faced with four Bar counsel pursuing me since last September, I checked to see whether there was one I might select who could get me through this process in less than two years.My favorite was one with whom I earlier spent more than two years while the Bar wrenched a public reprimand and $250 costs out of me. He was reluctant to give me an estimate, and apparently did not provide a free hour of consultation. I say he because each of the nine ads were for a “he.” name, it appears that there are few if any Asian or Hispanic surnames. Were any African- American? Of course, they could not say.   They had to be color-blind.Of course, I could get a lot of particular expertise for my money, depending on which era I believe my current problem arose most frequently in the past. One of the advertisers was Florida Bar counsel (1990-1998). A second was with The Florida Bar, Department of Lawyer Regulation (1984-June 2000).  A third was a former Bar counsel more recently (2005-January 2012).Surely their hourly rate exceeded $350 an hour. Mine is only $200, but I do not specialize. And I do wonder how the younger fellas and women can make a living at all, once they are presumed guilty of violations of Bar rules and regulations.If I thought I had a chance to get meaningful access to the court system for one of the cases I am handling, I would be glad to turn myself over to the mercy of the court. But, alas, it seems it is that very case which caused the Bar to come after me again, generally on grounds similar to those I faced in 2005. On that occasion, the Bar filed eight charges. None stuck.But this time there is more at stake. I am appealing a decision of a successor trial judge. He had thrown out 20 hours of testimony, dismissed all pleadings, and allowed one of clients to go forward, pro se.   She thought he was prejudiced against me, but he assured her he had a right to be, so she probably was wise to go forward without me.The judge had dismissed my corporate client and refused to allow me either at a deposition or in the courtroom in case my human client called me as a witness. The Bar might have left me alone, if I had not persisted in wanting the appeal. In all likelihood, the First District Court of Appeal can be counted on to affirm without an opinion, but the facts are such that media might get wind of them.To tell you the truth, it would really be fun to see this letter in print, but the News does not seem to want to indulge me as it once did three to four times a year. Too bad.Gabe Kaimowitz Gainesville E-filing I needed to file three papers in a Duval County existing action. The page on which one inputs the case number informs that leading zeros are not necessary.Funny thing: Until I added leading zeros, the system could not locate the case. Oh well, no huge deal — just another small example of the many glitches.One of the three papers was a Proof of Publication; under the “Common Civil Codes” drop-down list that paper is one of those listed. Good deal! But whoops, upon hitting the “save” button, I received an error message telling me that Proof of Publication cannot be filed through the portal because it is larger than 8.5 x 11 inches. Well, it could not know if it was larger or not because it had not accepted that paper for filing; and the one I was — still am — trying to file is precisely that size.Finally (probably not), if the system assumes that a POP is going to be too large, why include it in the drop-down list to begin with?William Nussbaum Jacksonville ____________________I find the questions and answers contained in the May 15 “Frequently asked e-filing questions” story enlightening. However, I have yet to see a method described for payment of filing fees by cash or check.Did I miss that? Am I correct in presuming such payment may be made to the appropriate clerk’s office by presenting the “Filing I.D.” to the clerk at the courthouse, or clerk’s satellite office, together with cash or attorney’s check for the sums owing?James E. Knight Clemmons, NC ( Editor’s Note: The Florida Courts E-Filing Portal accepts payment by certain credit cards or by ACH. ACH generally refers to a process wherein the filer authorizes funds to be taken from a bank account. Payment is to be rendered when the filing is made.) Hold No Grudges Roger Angel, who recently passed away, was a great lawyer and human being.I had the good fortune of meeting him when he was a solo practitioner in Miami around 1991. I was between jobs and was very down on my luck, and Roger showed me immense compassion and attention during that difficult period in my life.He gave me a lot of good advice on how to practice law in the criminal law field, something I still follow to this day and even took me out to a local Waffle House for a nice treat.He was like a “father figure” to me. He advised me to hold no grudges against those who hurt me, and that time will always show that I was right and they were wrong. I kept in touch with Roger for many years, even though I was in another part of the state, and obtained his valuable input and guidance not only on various practice matters but matters that affected me on a personal level.I hope that he will be remembered by all those whose lives he touched and molded for all times as a “man for all seasons.” May Roger be at peace wherever he is.Roshani M. Gunewardene Ft. Myers Potemkin Equality The governor’s letter vetoing the alimony reform legislation made explicit reference to the alimony provisions, yet said nothing about the proposed presumptive 50/50 time-share provision, which fell without discussion.This was feel-good legislation — without regard to children, school, history of care, and the more than adequate statutory scheme set out in Chapter 6, which is without any presumptions. These concepts further a general trend in law and elsewhere to replace reality with the euphemistic rubbish.Part of the progressive agenda is to sandpaper over words which have, to some, negative connotations. Thus, we eliminated the term “custody” and “visitation” from our legal lexicon. In the wider world, “prisons” are “departments of corrections,” and the “War Department” is now the “Defense Department. The Associated Press has recently banned the use of the phrase “illegal immigrant.” The act of Major Hasan and the slaughter at Ft. Hood is to this day regarded by the Defense Department as “workplace violence,” thus avoiding that unseemly term, “terrorist attack.”Back to the Legislature. Aside from those feeling good about the legislation — mostly men? — the proponents claim that historically the alimony and parenting time are simply unfair, unequal, and medieval. The support for the legislation was considerable, suggesting a sign of what could become a new officially recognized coalition of the oppressed, that is, men.And the basis, implied but unstated, is a concept called, “disparate impact.” It has been used honorably in voting and prisoner rights cases, but mostly in employment law. Simply, a facially neutral employment practice is one that does not appear to be discriminatory on its face; rather it is one that is discriminatory in its application or effect.How does this apply? I concede the following: If one were to review every family law case in the Southern Reporters, one would discover that in, let us estimate, 81 percent of the time the mother was awarded “custody,” or a majority of the parenting time. Ergo? Unfair, says the Legislature. We don’t know why, but we want to fix it, therefore presumptive 50/50 time-share. This legislation presupposes the requirement of affirmative action in its most irrational form.All of which reminds me of a personal anecdote. One evening, while I was attending a large dinner party in my honor at the Veranda. (Now you will say that this story never happened. May I remind you that is precisely beside the point!) I was seated on the dais adjacent to a gentleman. We talked of many things. As the evening wore on, he began to become sad and intense and talked of the horrific toll drunk drivers inflict on us all. He spoke knowingly of methods to lower the blood alcohol test from. 08 to. 01. Clearly, I was in the presence of someone hurting from some personal tragedy. “No, I just believe we have to stop all of this slaughter.” And he poured forth more statistics, and I nodded empathically and finally inquired, “What do you do for a living?” He said, “Well, I am the chief lobbyist and director of the Southwest Florida Taxicab Federation.”Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.Joseph P. Hoffman Ft. Myerslast_img read more

Africa has reported 1,158,217 COVID-19 infections: Africa CDC

first_imgAfrica CDC: Africa’s COVID-19 cases surpass 84,634 FILE PHOTO: A man washes his hands at the Primary Healthcare Centre, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Lagos, Nigeria May 7, 2020. Picture taken May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade AdelajaThe number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Africa stood at 1,158,217 on Friday, according to figures from the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.African countries continue to report steady rises in infections, but government remain optimistic the continent will beat the pandemic.Data from the Africa CDC also showed that the number of deaths on the continent stood at 26,968.South Africa remains the hardest-hit country in Africa, having registered 599,940 infections and 12,618 fatalities. It is the only country on the continent to have reported more than 100,000 cases.Globally, the country has eported the fifth-highest infections, only shadowed by the United States, Brazil, India and Russia.The country accounts for 51.8 percent of Africa’s total fatalities and 46.8 percent of its deaths.Egypt is the second-worst-hit country, having reported 97,025 confirmed cases and 5,212 fatalities.Further on, only four other African countries have reported more than 40,000 COVID-19 cases; Nigeria (50,964), Morocco (47,638), Ghana (43,260) and Algeria (40,258).In terms of deaths, Algeria (1,411) is the only other African country that has recorded more than 1,000 COVID-19 deaths.Related Africa’s COVID-19 cases rise to 88,172: Africa CDCcenter_img Africa’s COVID-19 infections surpass 927,000last_img read more

Tennis News Leander Paes Prepares For One Last Roar, To Retire In 2020

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi : Indian tennis icon Leander Paes on Wednesday announced that he will bring the curtains down on his illustrious career in 2020, which will be his farewell season on the Pro-circuit. His cupboard overflowing with hundreds of trophies, that include 18 coveted Grand Slam doubles titles, the 46-year-old has been enduring a lean patch for some time. The last of his 18 Grand Slams came in 2016 French Open mixed doubles with Martina Hingis. Paes, who is the most successful doubles player in the history of Davis Cup with 44 wins, recently dropped out of top-100 for the first time in 19 years.”I want to announce 2020 as my farewell year as a pro tennis player,” Paes wrote in a statement, which he posted on his twitter handle.”I am looking forward to the 2020 tennis calendar where I will be playing a few select tournaments, travelling with my team and celebrating with all my friends and fans around the world,” the statement read further. “It is all of you who have inspired me to become me and I want to take this year to say “Thank You” to you.”Paes is targeting to be the only tennis player in the history of the sport to play eight successive Olympics. In a career spanning nearly three decades, during which he also overcame a brain tumour, Tokyo Olympics (provided he qualifies) is expected to be his swansong.He is the only tennis player from the country to have won a singles Olympic medal as he grabbed a historic bronze at the 1996 Atlanta Games, beating Argentina’s  Fernando Meligeni in the play-off.With compatriot Mahesh Bhupathi, he created an awe-inspiring partnership during which they dominated the circuit in late 1990s, winning three Grand Slam titles together and claiming the number one rank.In their partnership, they also weaved a a record 24-match unbeaten streak before splitting as a team due to difference of opinion. India’s Davis Cup hero thanked his parents Dr Vece Paes and Jennifer, both of whom represented India at the highest level, for giving him sports genes.   “I want to thank my parents for their genetics, guidance, discipline, environment they created and unconditional love they’ve always shown me throughout my life, I would not be who I am without your unstinting support and belief in me, I love you.”He also thanked his two elder sisters and daughter Aiana.Paes asked fans to share their favourite memories of him over the years using #one last roar.”2020 is going to be an emotional one and I look forward to seeing all of you out there rolling with me. It has been an honour being your lionheart,” he concluded. last_img read more

Connacht Team To Face Ospreys Announced

first_imgDillane, Roux, Farrell and Blade all return to Connacht side for clash with Ospreys Connacht have been boosted by the return of Ultan Dillane, Quinn Roux, Tom Farrell and Caolin Blade from international duty who are named in the Connacht squad to play Ospreys in the Sportsground tomorrow. (Kick-Off 2.45pm).  Dillane and Roux continue their second row partnership that started the Six Nations game against Italy last weekend. They join a front five that includes props Denis Buckley and Finlay Bealham with Shane Delahunt coming in at hooker. The back row remains unchanged from the game against Glasgow, with captain Jarrad Butler starting at number 8 and Eoin McKeon and Colby Fainga’a at blindside and openside respectively. Kieran Marmion starts his second game in a row at scrum-half after returning from injury. He forms a half-back partnership with Kyle Godwin who comes in at out-half.  In the midfield, Peter Robb gets his first start of the season after impressing off the bench last time out. He is joined in the centre by the returning Tom Farrell.  The back three is unchanged with Stephen Fitzgerald and Matt Healy on the wings and Tiernan O’Halloran at full back.  With Connacht sitting three points ahead of Ospreys in Conference A of the PRO14, Head Coach Andy Friend knows how important a home win could prove against their conference rivals; “We have trained well and prepared well this week. We have seen a really positive response from the players after a disappointing result last weekend in Glasgow. We will continue to focus on our game and what we can control, as we have done all season. We know every game now is a must win and with a two-week break before our next game we are determined to finish this block on a high”, Friend said.  Commenting on his team selection, he added: “We are boosted by four of our players coming back from international duty. They bring a huge amount of experience to our matchday squad”, he added.Kick-off  2.45pm CONNACHT: Tiernan O’Halloran, Stephen Fitzgerald, Tom Farrell, Peter Robb, Matt Healy, Kyle Godwin, Kieran Marmion, (1-8) Denis Buckley, Shane Delahunt, Finlay Bealham, Quinn Roux, Ultan Dillane, Eoin McKeon, Colby Fainga’a, Jarrad Butler (Capt).Replacements: Tom McCartney, Peter McCabe, Conor Carey, James Cannon, Paul Boyle, Caolin Blade, Tom Daly, Cian Kelleher. print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

Northwestern State Upsets No. 15 Missouri

first_img“Mackenzie Neely had a tremendous performance throughout the match and there was no doubt who was getting the ball on match point,” Hernesman said. “She took a tough, high, aggressive swing in a situation where you can’t afford to be tentative and it obviously paid off.” “This has been a long time coming for this program,” fifth-year head coach Hugh Hernesman said. “We’ve got a saying around our program that good volleyball knows no levels and this is a direct testament to that. We’ve got tremendous respect for the Kreklow’s and what they’ve built at Mizzou, so to be able to come out on top over such a great program makes us extremely proud.” Neely led the Lady Demons with 14 kills followed by Davis with eight and Glynna Johnson with six. Senior Keelie Arneson added 13 digs while senior Emily Johnson grabbed 21 assists. After falling behind early in the second set, NSU battled back to take a 10-9 lead on a kill from junior Amanda Kunz. The Lady Demons would tally three consecutive points, taking a 14-11 lead and forcing Mizzou to take a timeout. Northwestern State 3, No. 15 Missouri 0DENTON, Texas – The Northwestern State volleyball program made history on Saturday, ending the nation’s longest regular season win-streak at 35 in a clean sweep of No. 15 Missouri (25-19, 25-19, 25-22) at the North Texas Invitational on Saturday afternoon. NSU came out firing in the first set, stringing together six consecutive points early to claim a 10-6 lead. NSU led by five points twice at 12-7 and again at 15-10 on a kill from freshman Aubrey Davis. Mizzou would bring the game as close as 19-18 before NSU went on a tear, scoring six of the game’s last seven points to take set number one. A senior Stacey DiFrancesco kill put the NSU lead at 20-16 before Mizzou tallied three consecutive points of its own. Following an NSU timeout, Neely’s kill and a Tigers error pushed the lead to 23-19. After some anxious moments during a Mizzou run, NSU closed the set and match out on a Neely kill at 25-22. “Despite the fact that we won in three, it was a back and forth match with lots of momentum swings,” Hernesman said. “I thought we did a great job of handling the tough situations and sticking with our training that we work so hard on every day. Now our task is to move our focus to Mississippi Valley and finish the weekend the right way. ” NSU followed up the monumental win an hour later, capturing another sweep, this time over Mississippi Valley State (25-8, 25-6, 25-9). With the Tigers needing a win in set three, NSU kept the pressure on, claiming a three-point lead at 13-10 and 14-11 thanks to kills by senior Mackenzie Neely and Johnson respectively. The NSU lead reached four at 16-12 behind a Davis kill and 17-13 thanks to another Johnson kill. Two clutch kills from Davis and another from sophomore Lauren Agan helped NSU extend its lead to 19-16 and they would not look back. NSU took the final six points of the match highlighted by consecutive kills from junior Glynna Johnson to win set two 25-19.last_img read more

Cambodia accuses Vietnam of complicity in illegal cross-border logging

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Endangered Species, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Rosewood, Tropical Forests Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Cambodia has accused neighboring Vietnam of systemically accepting fraudulent permits for rare, illegally trafficked rosewood timber.Siamese rosewood (Dalbergia Conchinchinensis) is one of the most valuable species of tree in the world and has been destructively logged in Cambodia.Items made from rosewood have been known to sell for millions of dollars in markets like China. HANOI — Cambodia has asked Interpol to investigate Vietnam after accusing its neighbor of knowingly accepting fraudulent permits for rare, illegally logged rosewood timber for transport across their shared border.Siamese rosewood (Dalbergia cochinchinensis) is one of the most valuable species of tree in the world to timber criminals. A single cubic meter can sell for as much as $5,000 in Cambodia, although that amount goes up significantly once it’s smuggled into Vietnam or China. The potential illegal profits are tantalizing: a single, ornately carved bedpost has been known to sell for as much as $1 million in Shanghai.Even after Cambodia banned logging of the rare and protected tree in 2013, stocks of the species have been devastated across the border with Vietnam by an insatiable industry.In 2017, Cambodia submitted letters to the U.N.’s Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which reveal how government officials requested Vietnam take action against the logging.Ty Sokhun, head of Cambodia’s CITES Management Authority, said in a letter to the U.N.’s International Environment House in October 2017 that Vietnam “continued to allow the entry into the country of rosewood, repeatedly referencing CITES permits, notwithstanding that they had been previously informed on several occasions of the illegality of those permits.”Jago Wadley, senior forests campaigner with the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), said that although there were likely to have been errors on both sides, Vietnam appeared to be at fault on this occasion.“Ultimately a state party to a U.N. convention has testified to the effect that Vietnam knew that fake permits were being used and ignored that information and continued accepting those fake permits,” he told Voice of America in an interview. “If the Vietnamese management authority has accepted those permits in lieu of information that the permits were fake, then it has done something wrong under the convention and needs to be held accountable.”Piles of rosewood litter the ground in Đồng Kỳ, Vietnam late last year. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.This is also not the first time such an accusation has been levied against Vietnam. An in-depth report by the EIA in May 2017 revealed that Vietnamese officials, companies and private individuals had smuggled enormous amounts of illegally logged timber from protected areas of Cambodia into Vietnam.In response to Cambodia’s claims, Ha Thi Tuyet Nga, director of Vietnam’s CITES Management Authority, wrote a letter to the EIA that questioned the organization’s intention in “publishing one-sided reports that undermine Vietnam’s efforts in combatting transnational timber trade crimes in Viet Nam and Cambodia.”The letter does not, however, deny the claims made against Vietnam, but rather states that Cambodia had failed to notify Vietnam about it ban on timber exports until March 2017.Nga also noted her frustration that the claims against Vietnam came at a sensitive time — just before the signing of a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) agreement between Vietnam and the European Union. On paper, the agreement would ensure that all timber exported to the EU from Vietnam has legal, verifiable origins, a move that has caused some to worry about the effect on illegal logging and natural habitats.“Rosewood species are an integral part of the Southeast Asia Forest Ecosystem,” Thibault Ledecq, regional forest coordinator for the WWF, said in an interview. “Curbing illegal logging is critical to not only protect this precious species but also the integrity of protected areas where they are found.”Ledecq said illegal logging was “destroying homes for endangered wildlife, livelihoods for communities that are managing their resources sustainably, and a critical defense in the fight against climate change.”Siamese rosewood has been almost entirely removed from certain border areas following trading under fake CITES permits, according to experts. The EIA’s Wadley said the problem was so severe that two protected areas, including Cambodia’s Snoul Wildlife Sanctuary, were dissolved earlier this year by royal decree after being almost entirely stripped of forest.The rare wood is laundered through a quota system in Vietnam, which ultimately gives it lawful status. The entire trade is worth at least $75 million and estimated kickbacks add up to as much as $13 million.last_img read more

Decolonizing trees in a tropical city to nurture multi-cultural identity

first_imgThe survey found that 73 percent of trees in Georgetown were cultivated for their edible fruits.The random distribution of trees suggests social cohesion, fostered by a sharing of food traditions, and could provide a blueprint for other multicultural cities.But climate change and economic growth mean tree preservation and planting are needed to mitigate social and environmental impacts. GEORGETOWN, Guyana — “Growing up in the country, I never knew about coffee and Milo. I grew up on lime leaf tea, pear leaf tea, fever grass, sweet broom, all these things,” Ubraj Narine says. He remembers the days when tea came not in packets from the supermarket but from the leaves of homegrown trees and bushes.Although some trees in Georgetown, the coastal capital of Guyana, have been felled, poorly maintained, or lost through climate change in recent years, the city’s urban forest is still of importance to its citizens.Narine is the mayor of Georgetown, and also a pandit, or Hindu priest. Many of the religious ceremonies that he performs in that latter role make use of “sacred” trees and plants found right in the city: slim mango leaves and round lotus pads; fibrous coconut shells, cracked open to reveal white flesh inside; colorful hibiscus flowers.Others value how trees provide cool shade from the blazing sun, ingredients for natural medicines, inspiration for stories, or a bountiful supply of food. Especially the food.In fact, according to a recent survey, a massive 73 percent of trees recorded in Georgetown were cultivated for their edible fruits.That survey forms the foundation of new paper published in July 2019 in a special section of the journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.last_img read more

15 years after tsunami, Aceh reckons with an inconsistent fisheries recovery

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor When a tsunami killed tens of thousands of people in Indonesia’s Aceh province, international donors contributed billions of dollars to disaster recovery effortsToday, gaps in post-disaster recovery are still visible. A breakdown of community dynamics post-disaster limited the effectiveness of some initiatives.The example of Aceh provides lessons to be learned for future disaster recoveries under the “build back better” approach, including the importance of long-term thinking when it comes to such initiatives. BANDA ACEH, Indonesia — Aceh is one of those destinations that glimmer chimerically on the horizon, alluring with its newness, but ever receding, ever retreating in memory with the passage of time. There are picturesque cliffs to the west if you drive on the coastal highway from capital city of Banda Aceh to the town of Calang, with the pristine, azure sea swirling foam to the east. Against the backdrop of colorful jetties are small shops decorated with curtains made by dangling threads of dried fish, octopuses splayed out like kites, and even stingrays. The threads twist and sway in the salty breeze like wind charms, the more browned portions of seafood skin shimmering in the sunlight, as humming women with infants tied in slings around their chests dole out anchovies on tarp-lined wooden tables. The older children run around their fishermen fathers closer to the water, unable to recall a time of catastrophe.Nearly 15 years ago, Aceh, a province on the northwestern tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, was severely hit by a 9.1 magnitude undersea earthquake that triggered one of the world’s biggest natural disasters. Massive waves rose up to 30 meters (100 feet) the day after Christmas in 2004, just 255 kilometers (160 miles) southeast of Banda Aceh. Nearly 230,000 people were reported dead or missing across a dozen countries; Indonesia itself accounted for nearly 168,000 of them. Much of Aceh was flattened, and television crews from around the world arrived to broadcast mountains of rubble, flatlands of black mud, and white shrouds filling up mass graves. Soon after, agencies — nonprofits, foreign governments, and aid organizations — teamed up for Aceh’s resurrection with an ambitious motto to “build back better.” The tsunami had acted as a circuit breaker to a three-decade-long separatist war between the Indonesian government and the Free Aceh Movement, or GAM, and along with the peace, the recovery efforts aimed at the socioeconomic betterment of the locals.Nearly 500 agencies teamed up to raise an unparalleled amount of funding at that time that totaled up to $7.7 billion. Within a four-year period, they prioritized newer and stronger infrastructure for the province and built 140,000 homes, close to 3,700 kilometers (2,300 miles) of road — including the western coastal highway rebuilt by USAID — 1,700 schools, 1,000 government buildings, and 36 airports and seaports. The physical spine of Aceh was spectacular; however, under tight deadlines and pressure from private donors for visible results, there were no quick fixes for tackling long-term drivers of vulnerability such as livelihood and social recovery. Now, 15 years later, gaps in post-disaster recovery are still visible. Unable to sustain growth despite the infrastructure, Aceh remains extremely poverty-ridden as per recent reports, with a slow economy and high unemployment rate.Ever since the 2004 tsunami, the aspirational phrase “build back better” has found its way into several disaster recovery plans and guidelines, including the U.N.-endorsed Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. This story looks back at Aceh to see what lessons have been learned to make that goal more inclusive of livelihoods in affected areas — particularly the case of fisheries in Aceh, which provided direct employment for more than 80,000 people, or 16 percent of the total coastal population, prior to the tsunami.Boats not worth usingSharifuddin sits repairing his lobster cages in a decrepit harbor in the tsunami-affected town of Calang nearly three hours away from Banda Aceh on the highway, on a platform overlooking a pier full of boats and canoes. The air is filled with the rotting smell of garbage. Nearby, there is an abandoned fuel pump (recently constructed but unused), and an empty marketplace filled with nylon ropes and plastic. There is a concrete pier, but the fishermen loading their boats use a wooden one they built themselves, claiming that the former splashes water and floods their vessels. Just a little ahead of where most of the boats are moored, a man floats on top of a rubber tire in green, murky water, trying to catch fish.Abandoned boats provided as tsunami aid decay along a pier in Aceh. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.Two big white boats decay on the sandbank. In their prime, the vessels would have outshone any other boat along this pier. But several years later, they have been eaten away by salt and time. “Not worth using,” Sharifuddin says. The boats were donated by nonprofits as part of the assistance programs after the tsunami, but they were never used. According to Sharifuddin, they were too light and not suited for the waves and wind in Aceh. Another white-and-blue boat donated by the Japanese rests unused under casuarina trees on Lamreh beach, an hour from downtown Banda Aceh.In 2004, there were 15,576 fishing boats in Aceh, according to a study based on data from the provincial fisheries department. Then the tsunami hit and the fishing community suffered exorbitantly, both in human and material loss: nearly 10,000 fishers lost their lives and close to 70 percent of Aceh’s small-scale fleet was destroyed. By 2008, the number of boats had increased to 17,584, thanks to development assistance. But by 2011, after the aid agencies had left, the number of boats in Aceh dropped back to 15,995. Research claims that this decline was due largely to poor-quality and inappropriate boats donated by the NGOs.The aid agencies tried solving problems in an expedited time frame without adequate assessment of requirements, through a deluge of short-term recovery programs, cash grants and immediate distribution of boats and gear that would result in visible impact for the media and donors. The U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reported that the agencies did not have the technical capacity to provide the right inputs, and some of them chose to ignore scientific standards and norms in the eagerness to provide aid. Boats were made with poorly selected timber, inadequate through-hull fittings and pipework, and thin planking. The agencies did not monitor their boat-building programs sufficiently, and some commissioned builders took on more projects than they could deliver adequately, compromising the quality of the vessels.An abandoned gas pump along a pier in Aceh. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.During the construction tizzy, there was a concern of overfishing due to an excess number of boats. Eventually, as the vessels started to fail, the FAO recommended that unsafe boats not be handed over to beneficiaries but be modified or even broken up.Michael Boyland, a researcher at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), found similar cases in the city of Tacloban in the Philippines that was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. The city government also claimed to use “build back better” as one of the central approaches to its disaster recovery program. Boats were provided that were not usable, so many people repurposed the wood for shelters and furniture. The donor markings are still visible on homemade tables in some cases. “Of course coordination in disasters of this [large] scale is not easy, but I think it is also driven by a need to be doing something helpful in the immediate aftermath, and there is not always time to sufficiently plan and consult everybody before acting — especially when there are lives at stake,” Boyland says. He suggests disaster preparation before the event to map out tentative allocation of resources across the spectrum of immediate response and recovery interventions as much as possible.Impact on traditional fishing platformsBack in Aceh, Zulfikar, a 43-year-old fisherman, drives his worn-out red boat from his fish ponds to a brightly colored contraption in the waters several kilometers off the coast of his village, Lhok Seudu, which is along the west coast of Aceh, 35 kilometers from Banda Aceh’s city center. Anchored atop two boats is a platform that he and eight or nine other fishermen use during the eastern monsoons, attracting fish at night using lamps. When dawn breaks, they return to the waterfront in their boats to sell their catch.This traditional fishing vessel is known as a palong. When the tsunami hit Aceh, it also devastated several palongs along its coastline. Fishermen could not afford to rebuild the destroyed communal platforms, so the agencies stepped in. John McCarthy, a development specialist at the Australian National University, surveyed some of the new palongs eight years after the disaster and found only a few of them to be working, depending one major factor: how long after the tsunami the palongs were rebuilt.The Singapore Red Cross sponsored local builders to construct five palongs in the surveyed villages. By 2012, four of them were still operating. The nonprofit had initiated the project after enough time had passed since the tsunami and the local fishers felt comfortable returning to the sea. The main fishing village oversaw the platforms’ operation, with each hamlet head supervising an individual palong. There was enough time and space given for the community to self-organize and distribute benefits and responsibilities. The palong heads learned to repair the platforms and to protect the asset as private owners.Zulfikar, a fisherman, shows the palong he works on during the eastern monsoons. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.In contrast, the Asian Development Bank funded the construction of six palongs. By 2012, none of the platforms were in operation. Commissions by Oxfam and USAID in neighboring villages faced similar fates. As per McCarthy’s study, each of the unsuccessful projects had been initiated immediately after the tsunami, when the villagers were not psychologically motivated to go back to the sea and were dependent directly on emergency relief. The projects were also handed to fishing cooperatives or user groups set up by the agencies outside accepted local authority structures. In each case, the villagers had either failed to maintain the palong or had experienced internal conflicts within the cooperatives, or the cooperative had fallen into debt. Processes were not set up in detail for these community groups, and a lack of ownership and accountability resulted in a plethora of financial problems that led to some of the palongs being abandoned or sold.Including indigenous community networksThe deficiencies in group management arose from the breakdown of community dynamics post-disaster. The old, indigenous enforcement institution for fisheries in Acehnese communities is known as panglima laot, which roughly translates to “sea commander.” This system has date back up to 400 years, to the time when Aceh was a sultanate. The name also doubles up for the leader of the fishing community, the most learned and experienced individual in fishing practices, who ensures that the rules of the sea, or hukom adat laot, are followed — for instance, no trawlers and explosives are allowed for fishing to prevent environmental degradation. One of the tragedies of the tsunami was the death of 59 of 193 of these customary leaders in different pockets, and with them the loss of local knowledge and an interconnected functional community. The coastal members who survived the tsunami almost immediately elected their new panglima laot, but in many cases, the new leaders were often either very young and inexperienced, or elderly and unprepared to take on the responsibility. Many who were not full-time fishing skippers got elected. The fishery projects that were evaluated to be successful by researchers in the post-disaster recovery process engaged in strengthening of these social structures.Baharuddin, one of the surviving Panglima Laot leaders, oversees daily fishing activities in Lam Teungoh village. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Monagbay.However, research done by Boyland and his colleagues from SEI in 2015 revealed that many of the local fishing communities led by their panglima laot did not embrace the ambitious aim of “building back better” within the mandated recovery time frame. Instead, they wanted to return to their pre-tsunami livelihoods.One example of this is Baharuddin, one of the surviving chiefs in Lam Teungoh village, who had vehemently opposed the government’s proposal of a coastal buffer that prohibited permanent construction of new buildings within a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) radius of low-lying coastal areas. Fishermen like him must live by the sea, he explains, despite the fact that he lost almost every member of his family in the tsunami — his father, mother, brother, sister, wife, teenage son and four daughters, including a 1-month-old infant. “I said to the government, before you ask me [to relocate], you ask the people who live close to the sea in Jakarta,” he laughs. The people who live by the ocean in Indonesia’s capital are as dependent on it for livelihood as his community is in Aceh. Widespread resistance to the coastal buffer finally led to the government rescinding its prohibition in mid-2005.Boyland attributes this to the failed pantomime between the aid agencies and the people: “Fairly soon after the disaster, the United Nations, represented by Bill Clinton and the NGOs were pushing for a ‘build back better’ approach — saying ‘let’s use this as an opportunity to make these places better than they were before.’ But was ‘build-back better’ well-defined and commonly understood beyond principles? Were the people of Aceh consulted on this? Was the historical context of Aceh fully understood by outside actors? Arguably, not nearly enough in all cases.”According to Boyland, the balance lies in keeping livelihood central to different aspects of post-disaster recovery such as housing reconstruction, relocation, community participation, and infrastructure. Livelihood is primarily thought of in terms of income, he says, but is in fact a more durable solution that encompasses human, financial, natural, physical and social needs.Multidimensional recoveryThe overall story of fisheries in Aceh is one of inconsistent progress, and 15 years later, this has contributed to Aceh’s economic slump, even with the new infrastructure. There is corroding poverty and high unemployment. However, certain slip-ups were inevitable given the scale of destruction. Aceh remains a sufficiently well-documented model in post-disaster recovery practices due to the volume of unprecedented multi-donor funding that was pumped into a developing nation, and the urgency that came with it.But Aceh’s current situation cannot be attributed solely to shortcomings in post-disaster recovery 15 years ago. Its plight is due heavily to a plethora of local vectors such as political power dynamics after decades of conflict in a semi-autonomous province, improper resource utilization, and lack of official accountability. As local activist and former World Bank consultant Muslahuddin Daud likes to put it, “Aceh is ready to fight, but not to grow.” But what merits special thought for better positive outcomes, according to him, is the need for sufficient investment of time for aid; one that divides funding into phases for emergency response, and then reconstruction and long-term recovery efforts. This is a lesson that has been picked up by the city of Tacloban, at least in theory: according to the central planning document, goals were divided into early recovery projects (shelter, livelihood, infrastructure restoration) to be completed within three years, and longer-term developmental projects to be implemented between three and nine years after Haiyan.The world has moved on to other calamities since Aceh, but the province still harbors lessons for the future behind its veil of freshly paved roads and new buildings. Ask the people living around the fishing boat resting on the first floor of a house inland in Banda Aceh. The traces of struggle amid the resilience are not hard to find.Banner: Khairullah, a fisherman, leans against an abandoned boat donated by Japan on Lamreh beach in Aceh.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Community Development, Disasters, Environment, Featured, Fishing, Foreign Aid, Governance, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Oceans last_img read more