Looking back from 2020 how will we view this golden opportunity to build homes if it’s missed

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

UN officials propose GPS tracking on albino children

first_imgKenya Chief Justice David Maraga with UN Independent expert on the rights of persons with albinism Ikponwosa Ero on Monday UN officials will this week consider whether to offer GPS tracking to albino children.The proposal is to be tabled at a special forum on albinism being hosted in Tanzania.Campaigners hope it could lead to more protection for albinos, who are frequently targeted for their body parts.CCTV’s Dan Ashby has this report.last_img

Offensive line sparks LSU’s rebound

first_imgBATON ROUGE – The way LSU’s offensive line approached the Florida game last week was simple. If it did not do something about it, it was not going to get done.The Tigers were coming off a 41-7 loss at Auburn. One touchdown was the worst output by an LSU offense since a 14-6 loss at Florida in 2012.“We want to shoulder the burden,” junior left guard Vadal Alexander said this week. “To anything that goes wrong, we got it. We’ll fix it.”Sophomore right tackle Jerald Hawkins seconded that. “We pretty much took it personal up front what happened at Auburn,” he said. “As the big brothers of the team, we on the offensive line took it upon ourselves.”LSU’s offensive line of four returning starters, including three upper classmen, dominated a Florida defensive line that was the chief reason the Gators entered the game fourth in the Southeastern Conference against the run with 103 yards allowed a game. The Tigers gained 195 yards rushing in a 30-27 victory.The Tigers reeled off 10 running plays of 10 yards or more. Through Florida’s previous four games, it had allowed just 11 such plays for third in the nation.“We wanted our assignments and execution to be perfect so all the receivers, tight ends, running backs and quarterbacks can make their plays and be the playmakers they are,” Alexander said.Freshman tailback Leonard Fournette did just that, enjoying his best day as a collegian with 140 yards on 27 carries. He had two runs of 20 yards and runs of 16, 15 and 12 yards. He had 44 yards in the first quarter and was over 100 by the third period.“Feel like the offensive line keeps getting better,” said LSU coach Les Miles, whose Tigers (5-2, 1-2 SEC) host Kentucky (5-1, 2-1 SEC) at 6:30 p.m. Saturday on the SEC Network.“We knew what we had to come out and do,” Alexander said. “Punch them in the mouth and be physical with them for the first snap and throughout the game. I think we did that, and I think we set the tone throughout the game.”Alexander sure did. He was named the SEC offensive lineman of the week.“Vadal really exploded. He uplifted his play by 10 times. It showed on film. He deserved the award he got this week from the league,” Hawkins said.Tailback Terrence Magee added 50 yards on six carries. The Tigers, who were 0-for-13 on third downs at Auburn, were 7 of 16 at Florida and garnered 21 first downs in all.“I think it was a dominant day for them,” Miles said. “This team’s improving. Leonard really runs the football like we’re used to having it run around here.”There were four sacks of quarterback Anthony Jennings, but he did have enough time to complete a critical, third-and-25 pass late in the game to wide receiver Travin Dural for 41 yards and then an 11-yard touchdown to Dural for a 27-24 lead with 2:40 to go.After the offensive line improved and dominated, LSU’s playmakers like Dural and Fournette did just that.“It was great to see Fournette,” Alexander said. “Oh yeah, he was doing his thing, man. We were opening up holes as an offense, and he was running through them with great decisiveness. He’s hitting the holes extremely fast now. He’s definitely showing out and doing what we need him to do. He’s going to keep getting better.”And so may LSU’s offensive line. Kentucky enters Saturday’s game eighth against the run in the SEC with 152 yards allowed a game.“We knew we were going to get better,” Alexander said. “We knew we were going to have better chemistry and execution. I think you’re starting to see that now. It definitely felt good to get that first SEC win. It feels good to have that taste of victory again, and we look forward to having many more.”last_img read more

Danram, Savory, Algoo, Bookie top batsmen

first_imgAs the Georgetown Cricket Association/New Building Society 40-overs second division tournament enters the final match, Omesh Danram is the top batsman with  Kemol Savory, Alex Algoo and Alphius Bookie also among the chart toppers. According to the official statistician of the tournament, so far the tournament has recorded five centuries and eight, five-wicket hauls.Danram, who represents Georgetown in the Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) Franchise League and played for semi finalists, University of Guyana (UG) in this competition, gaps his competition with a total of 285 runs at an average of 40 while Savory and Algoo, playing for Police Sports Club tallied 228 and 218 runs respectively in  Group A. Autoplay Autoplay1 of 3Alex AlgooAlphius BookieKemol SavoryDemerara Cricket Club’s Bookie is the lone batsman in Group B with over 200 runs (208). Bookie has one of the two centuries scored in Group B, an unbeaten 102 while his clubmate, Raymond Perez, has the highest score in the group with 121. Both came against Sophia as well as Marcus Watkins’ 93 for Malteenoes Sports Club.Savory stroked 146 against the Guyana Defence Force for the highest individual score of the competition while Danram blasted 136 against Police. Transport Sports Club’s Sunil Singh has the other century of the group after scoring 113 against Ace Warriors.UG’s Dennis Haywood leads the way with the ball, picking up 16 wickets at an average of 25 with Transport’s Kevin Ross chalking up 15 wickets in Group A. Police’s Jason Heyliger (13), UG’s Dwayne Dodson (11) and Police’s Vishal Jaigobin (10) round oout the top five wicket-takers in the group. Mohamed Ayube of Muslim Youth Organisation (MYO) has the best bowling figures of the group, 6-21 while Heimchan Persaud (Police), Ershad Ali (UG), Ayube Kwame (MYO) all picked up five wicket hauls for 26, 34 and 38 runs respectively.In Group B, Georgetown Cricket Club’s Devon Lord has notched up the most scalps, claiming 13 wickets at an impressive average of just four. Gandhi Youth Organisation’s Trevon France equals Lord in the wickets column but averages 11.2. Alvin Castello of Third Class is third with eight wickets while Ashmead Nedd (DCC) and Joshua Wade (GCC) took seven wickets each.Nedd has the best bowling figures for the group with 6-23 against Sophia. GCC’s Keon Joseph who picked up 5-11 and Ryan Shaun of the Guyana National Industrial Corporation with 5-27 against DCC were the only five wicket hauls of the group. There were a few stand outs in the fielding department with Wade taking the most catches of Group B with seven and Akeem Redman (Transport) taking eight catches and one run out. Linden Austin (UG) has six catches and two run outs for Group A.The last match of the competition will see DCC battling arch rivals GCC for the title.last_img read more

Boxing: Irish Superstar Michael Conlan wants to headline a Stadium card in Ireland

first_imgAdvertisement 6mlNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs047tWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Eolk( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 8bz8Would you ever consider trying this?😱nd6aCan your students do this? 🌚4u6gRoller skating! Powered by Firework Adielson Dos Santos was the victim of Conlan’s first win as the headliner of a professional card. With this success in his home country, Conlan wants to showcase himself in one of the bigger stadiums in Ireland. Specifically, a fight at Casement Park; home of the Gaelic Athletic Association.Advertisement Conlan would relish the chance of fighting at a redeveloped Casement Park.Advertisement The Falls Road featherweight, who headlined last Saturday night’s bill at the SSE Arena, would also be keen to fight at Falls Park or join Carl Frampton on a show at Windsor Park.“I would love a huge fight in Windsor Park in the future, that would be amazing,” he said.Advertisement “Fighting there for a world title, or if Casement Park is up and ready would be amazing.“Even the Falls Park, we were approached last year to do the Feile.The 2016 Olympian has acknowledged he could be on a fight card with fellow countrymen Carl Frampton if he were to fight at Casement Park.In the event that this would occur, it would definitely be something major in Ireland. Conlan is on the rise with Top Rank as his promoter and there seem to be huge opportunities on the rise for him. Advertisementlast_img read more

Carnival springs into style

first_imgPAKENHAM launched into the Spring Racing Carnival in fine style with its big Evergreen Turf Guineas Day race meeting on…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Galway United manager search continues after McParland U-turn

first_imgGalway United’s search for a manager to replace Tommy Dunne will continue this week as the man hotly tipped to be unveiled as his successor has suddenly done a u-turn and withdrawn from the position. 55 year old Scot Ian McParland had emerged in recent days as the preferred choice of the club, but even though he had apparently agreed terms to take over at Eamon Deacy Park, complications over the make up of his back room staff have arisen and the former Notts County boss has opted not to take up the role. McParland had reportedly been recommended by Roy Keane for the job, as the two had worked together at Ipswich Town. United will now return to the appointment process and consider the likes of U19 manager Johnny Glynn, who led the clubs youth side to the league final last week and will always be considered a legend in Terryland for leading the Tribesmen to FAI Cup glory in 1991, Galway native Ollie Horgan, the current Finn Harps manager, and Johnny McDonnell who previously managed St Pats and Drogheda.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

Irish Golfing Unions set to merge

first_imgThe ILGU and GUI will now prepare for EGMs of the organisations at which affiliated clubs will vote on the Proposal. In the coming months, Information Packs containing important details regarding the new organisation will be prepared and issued to affiliated clubs. The packs will include the Proposal and all information pertinent to clubs, in the form of an Executive Summary and Frequently Asked Questions.The EGMs are expected to be held before the end of 2018, with the club briefings being held in advance of the vote date. The ILGU and the GUI will hold separate club briefings with their respective ladies and men’s clubs in advance of the vote date. The exact date(s) for the briefings and the EGMs will be agreed by the respective Boards, with affiliated clubs being notified in due course.If the clubs of the ILGU and GUI support the proposal, a transitions phase will commence during which the GUI, ILGU and Confederation of Golf in Ireland (CGI) will be wound down and the new body will be established to carry out all activities currently undertaken by the three organisations.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Following extensive discussions and consultation, the Boards of the Golfing Union of Ireland (GUI) and the Irish Ladies Golf Union (ILGU) have approved a Proposal which provides for the formation of a single governing body for Golf in Ireland.last_img read more

Indonesia to get first payment from Norway under $1b REDD+ scheme

first_imgIndonesia and Norway have agreed on a first payment from a $1 billion deal under which Indonesia preserves its rainforests to curb carbon dioxide emissions.The agreement comes nearly a decade since the deal was signed in 2010, with the delay attributed largely to the need for legislation and policy frameworks to be put in place, as well as a change in the Indonesian government since then.The amount of the first payment still needs to be negotiated by both sides, with Indonesia pushing for a higher valuation than the $5 per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent that Norway paid Brazil under a similar deal.Indonesia still has work to do to ensure a consistent pace of progress and tackle the forest fires that account for much of the loss of its forests. JAKARTA — It’s taken nearly a decade, but Indonesia is finally set to receive the first part of a $1 billion payment pledged by the Norwegian government for preserving some of the Southeast Asian country’s vast tropical rainforests.Indonesia’s environment minister, Siti Nurbaya Bakar, and her Norwegian counterpart, Ola Elvestuen, made the announcement in Jakarta on Feb. 16. The payment, whose amount is yet to be determined, is for Indonesia preventing the emission of 4.8 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) through reducing its rate of deforestation in 2017.“Indonesia has embarked on bold regulatory reforms, and it is showing results,” Elvestuen said. “It may be too early to see a clear trend, but if deforestation continues to drop we stand ready to increase our annual payments to reward Indonesia’s results and support its efforts.”The two countries signed the $1 billion pact in 2010, under the REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) mechanism. In exchange for the funding, Indonesia would have to slow its emissions from deforestation, which accounts for the bulk of its CO2 emissions.That it’s taken so long for the first payment to be announced is due to a combination of the structuring of the agreement and a change in the Indonesian government since the 2010 signing.The partnership is led by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative, under which the oil-rich Scandinavian country has pledged to underwrite tropical forest conservation programs in Indonesia as well as Brazil, Liberia, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Guyana.The cooperation between the countries is divided into phases, in which the first two phases are about getting the rainforest countries ready to stop deforestation through changes in national legislation and frameworks.Phase three starts when the rainforest countries manage to reduce deforestation, and that’s when the fund starts paying out, based on reduced emissions.Indonesia was mired in the two initial phases following a setback in 2015, when President Joko Widodo, who took office a year earlier from Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, disbanded BP REDD+, the agency his predecessor had set up to coordinate the scheme.Widodo delegated the agency’s duties and powers to the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, headed by Siti. (The move was part of a wider restructuring headlined by the merger of the previously separate ministries of forestry and of the environment.)It also took long for Indonesia to prepare a comprehensive integrated measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) system necessary to account for its progress in reducing emissions, further delaying the transition into phase three.REDD+ is designed to keep tropical forests standing, and carbon sequestered. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.‘A matter of life and death’Environmentalists have lauded the latest development, which mark’s Indonesia’s entry into the phase at which it’s starting to roll back emissions from deforestation. The funding serves as both an acknowledgement of the years of efforts to reach this stage of protecting the country’s forests, and an incentive to boost measures to combat deforestation.“This is fantastic news for the climate, for the world’s animal and plant species, and for the millions of people who depend on these forests,” said Øyvind Eggen, director of the Rainforest Foundation Norway, an NGO.Indonesia is home to the world’s third-largest span of tropical rainforest, after Brazil and the Democratic Republic of Congo. When these rainforests are destroyed or degraded, large amount of CO2 emissions are released into the atmosphere.Indonesia is already the fifth-largest emitter in the world, largely through its forestry sector. That makes preserving Indonesia’s rainforests pivotal for the world to prevent catastrophic climate change, experts say. Saving these forests is also critical for the survival of the rich biodiversity they host.“Saving this rainforest is a matter of life and death, and is important to us all,” Eggen said.Female Sumatran rhino in Way Kambas, Sumatra, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Quantifying emissions reductionsNow that Indonesia’s MRV protocol is in place, it has to convince Norway about the integrity of the system in verifying that reductions in CO2 emissions really are being achieved.“We’ve been discussing this MRV protocol [with Norway] since last year because it will affect the calculation of carbon emissions that we’ve reduced,” said Ruandha Agung Suhardiman, the Indonesian environment ministry’s head of climate change.The country initially measured its progress in reducing emissions from deforestation by using as its baseline the deforestation rate in 1990, which was inordinately high. That would inflate the apparent progress being made toward reductions, Ruandha said.Both countries subsequently agreed that Indonesia’s results should be measured against a 10-year average level of emissions for the 2006-2016 period. Annual emissions during that period were estimated at 237 million tons CO2e from deforestation and 42 million tons from forest degradation.“The government then started to issue regulations aimed at lowering emissions,” Ruandha said. “[Norway] wouldn’t have accepted not having such regulations in place, because then we might have lowered our emissions based on sheer luck, for example because of weather factors.”A crested black macaque in Sulawesi. Image for Mongabay.Defining deforestationNorway’s acknowledgement of Indonesia’s MRV system marks another important development in Indonesia’s forest management, says Arief Wijaya, a senior manager for climate and forests at the World Resources Institute (WRI) Indonesia.Indonesia has for years courted controversy over the definition of what counts as deforestation.The term is almost universally understood to mean the conversion of natural forest cover to other land-use categories. That includes clearing forests for the cultivation of industrial plantations: acacia and eucalyptus for pulpwood, for instance.The Indonesian government, on the other hand, doesn’t take that view. It counts man-made plantations, including industrial pulpwood plantations, as forested areas. That means that when non-forested areas are planted with acacia and eucalyptus, they are considered forest.The WRI, a Washington-based think tank with an office in Indonesia, has cautioned that the disparity may hamper Indonesia’s bid to seek foreign funding to support its initiatives to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation.Without a universally agreed-on definition of deforestation, it might be difficult for Indonesia to cite its own data to claim funding.But Norway’s acceptance of Indonesia’s MRV system indicates that Jakarta has abandoned its own definition, at least for the purposes of the deal with Norway, according to Arief.“It’s up to Indonesia to report its deforestation rate in accordance with its own definition,” he said. “But look — Norway only considers emissions reductions from deforestation in natural forests. It means that when natural forests are converted into industrial plantations, deforestation has happened, according to this bilateral agreement.”Arief said this made Indonesia’s published data on emissions reductions more accountable.“It means it’s true that Indonesia has indeed managed to reduce 4.8 million tons of CO2e,” he said, “especially since the figure accounts for uncertainties. I’m quite confident about the number.”He said the 2017 reduction was the equivalent of preventing the deforestation of 100 square kilometers (38 square miles) of forest, on the assumption that a hectare of tropical forest in Indonesia holds an average 132 tons of CO2e.“A hundred square kilometers seems very small, compared to the forestry ministry’s data on declining deforestation, which was very high,” at 1,510 square kilometers in 2017. “But the ministry’s figure counts industrial plantations,” Arief said.Fires smoldering from a peat forest in West Kalimantan. Image by Aseanty Pahlevi/Mongabay Indonesia.Money mattersWhile the first tranche of the payment has been agreed to, there’s still some way to go before the money is actually released.First, both countries need to agree on the amount. Ruandha said the Indonesian government wanted a high valuation for each ton of CO2e reduced to be high, more than what Brazil earned under its own deal with Norway.“Of course we want Indonesia to get a higher price,” he said. “It takes tremendous effort to reduce deforestation and forest degradation in Indonesia. It doesn’t happen overnight. And how would we compensate for people’s livelihoods? If they can’t cut down trees, what’s the compensation [for them]? That’s why we don’t want a low price.”Brazil earns $5 for each ton of CO2e it reduces through preventing deforestation, according to Arief. Between 2009 and 2016, it earned an average of 925 million krone ($108 million) a year from Norway, with the money channeled to the Amazon Fund, set up by Brazil as part of its initiative to reduce deforestation.Based on that price, Indonesia would receive $24 million from Norway for its 2017 efforts — a valuation that Ruandha called “very low.”Another missing piece of the puzzle is the lack of official funding mechanism in Indonesia, akin to Brazil’s Amazon Fund.When BP REDD+ was still in charge, it worked on a funding scheme called Financing REDD+ in Indonesia (FREDDI). Its purpose was to distribute financial assistance via grants, investments and trade intermediaries. But the scheme was scrapped along with BP REDD+. In its place, the government moved to establish a new funding instrument that would underwrite all environmental initiatives, not just those under REDD+.The office of Indonesia’s coordinating minister for the economy plans to establish the new funding instrument, known by its Indonesian acronym, BLU, sometime this year.The existing funding instrument under the forestry ministry will be integrated into the new BLU, according to Siti, the minister.“It’s not easy [to establish the BLU], but we’re currently trying to find a model that’s the easiest for us,” she said.As both countries work on the details of the payout, environmentalists have urged Indonesia not to get sidetracked by the money and to focus on tackling addressing the litany of tasks needed to improve its forest governance.Anggalia Putri Permatasari, a researcher at the NGO Madani Foundation for Sustainability, said the spirit of REDD+ and the bilateral partnership wasn’t meant to be financial. “[The money] is an incentive to mobilize actions [to reduce deforestation],” she said.Through the deal, REDD+ is expected to serve as an entry point for a slew of improvements to land and forest management, including good governance, transparency, and anti-corruption measures, Anggalia said. She said lack of transparency still dogged Indonesia’s forest management, citing the land ministry’s decision to withhold data on right-to-cultivate permits for plantation and farming businesses, known as HGU permits.Each HGU permit includes details such as land boundaries, coordinates and the area of the concession, as well as the leaseholder’s name. The HGU documents are vital because withholding them enables land-grabbing, with companies often laying claim to community lands without having to show their concession maps.Arief said that while Indonesia had implemented a number of critical reforms and actions in the forestry sector over the last few years, including a ban on destroying primary forests and peatlands, and increased law enforcement action against forest crimes, there were still some areas rich in rainforests at risk of deforestation, such as the easternmost region of Papua.“Law enforcement has to be strengthened because we’re seeing a serious threat against rainforests in Papua and West Papua provinces,” Arief said. “Recently, more than 300 containers of illegally logged timber from Papua were confiscated. There’s also ongoing forest clearing in Boven Digoel district. Land clearing due to palm oil expansion has also intensified in Teluk Bintuni district.”A clouded leopard in Kalimantan. Photo by Spencer Wright/Wikimedia CommonsFluctuating by the yearArief said Indonesia could stand to learn from Brazil’s experience in its REDD+ deal with Norway, including the importance of being consistent in efforts to reduce deforestation.In 2017, he said, Norway’s rainforest payment to Brazil was dropped to 350 million krone ($41 million) as a result of increased deforestation in the Amazon the previous year.“This means that all efforts to reduce deforestation and forest degradation must continue,” Arief said. “Since the largest amount of [Indonesia’s] emissions come from forest fires and deforestation, the government needs to make sure there are no more fires if they want to keep getting paid.”During the particularly dire dry season of 2015, forest fires in Indonesia raged so intensely that they generated huge clouds of toxic smog that spread as far as Singapore and Malaysia, sparking a diplomatic spat. In Indonesia alone, the smoke sickened half a million people, according to government figures.The 2015 fires razed 26,000 square kilometers (10,038 square miles) of land across Indonesia, but since then the problem largely abated. In 2017, the area burned was just 6 percent of the 2015 total, allowing Indonesia to claim an emissions reduction of 24.4 percent from the business-as-usual scenario.In 2018, however, there was a significant uptick of forest fires, with 5,100 square kilometers (1,970 square miles) of land scorched — three times the size of area burned in 2017 — thanks to a more intense dry season than in the previous two years.Fires in peat forests alone in 2016 emitted 96.7 million tons of CO2, according to government figures. The final figure for 2018, not yet published, is expected to far exceed that, given that peat fire emissions in the first eight months of the year already hit 76 million tons.Crucially, emission reductions from peat degradation and peat fires aren’t included in Indoensia’s REDD+ deal with Norway. But they are expected to be included in the accounting mechanism as estimates improve.“The 2018 fires were quite bad and so our emissions reduction will decrease again,” Ruandha said. “But we still have until 2030″ to meet a target of cutting emissions by 29 percent from business-as-usual projections.“The point is that if we can prevent fires from breaking out, and manage our peat forests well, then our climate target will be met.” Biodiversity, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Finance, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forestry, Illegal Logging, Palm Oil, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Biodiversity, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation Banner image: A coast in Nechiebe village of Ravenirara district, Papua province. Image by Christopel Paino/Mongabay-Indonesia. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

Ekuri Initiative: Inside a Nigerian community’s battle to keep its forest

first_imgBiodiversity, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Deforestation, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Ekuri Community in southeastern Nigeria started an initiative in the early 1990s to manage their community forest adjacent to the Cross River National Park, home to the critically-endangered Cross River gorilla and a suite of other unique and threatened species.Formalized through the Ekuri Initiative, planned community forest management has helped to drive local development, conservation, sustainable forest management and address poverty by improving access to sustainable livelihoods.The Initiative has resisted threats from logging companies and more recently attempts by state authorities to build a 260-km superhighway that would have destroyed much of the community forest.However, community leaders worry that if state and national governments continue to ignore their efforts, villagers might think conservation efforts do not respect their rights to survival. LAGOS, NIGERIA — Surrounded by smoke-capped dense forest thick with tall, evergreen trees and wildlife, the Ekuri people in southeastern Nigeria’s Cross River state treasure the forest near their homes.From there, they have for decades obtained plants for medicine; water for drinking and washing; vegetables, fruits and seeds for food; and other products such as timber, rattan, and bamboo for roofing and furniture.A woman in Old Ekuri extracts bush mango seeds from the shells. The forest provides income and food for many villagers here in the Ekuri Community. Image credit: Linus Unah.But they had a problem.Old Ekuri and New Ekuri villages, collectively known as Ekuri Community, had no access road between them, only a footpath cutting through the forest. People trekked for up to four hours, oftentimes with headloads or goods wedged on their shoulders, as they moved to or returned from local markets.Villagers’ longing for an access road in the 1980s drove the community to consider granting a concession to a logging company to harvest timber and build a motorway in return.However, Chief Otey Esira, village head of New Ekuri, argued against this arrangement and, since both villages have equal ownership of the forest, the deal fell through without his support. Esira exhorted the people to maintain the forest and shared stories of neighboring communities whose forests were destroyed after logging companies received concessions.“Why not keep our forests so that they can continue to yield the benefits we have seen over the centuries?” Edwin Ogar, from New Ekuri, recalled the chief saying at that time.It takes a CommunityIn 1986, the Community itself started building this 40-kilometer (24-mile) stretch of road. They raised funds from levies collected from buyers of forest products like the highly sought-after afang (Gnetum africanum) leaves. Community members made financial contributions or offered any valuable materials that would aid the construction.The access road reached Old Ekuri in 1990, connecting the two villages and providing market access to residents, most of whom farm several crops, for subsistence and for sale. Image credit: Linus Unah.By the time this untarred road reached Old Ekuri in 1990, plans were underway to establish the Cross River National Park. The Community requested to manage their forest on their own. After they received approval from park authorities, the idea of forming a community-based organization, endorsed by village elders since the 1980s, crystallized into the now popular Ekuri Initiative in 1992.The aim was to have a vehicle that would drive community development, conservation, sustainable forest management and address poverty by improving access to sustainable livelihoods. The Initiative took on the road construction project and built about four bridges and several culverts along the path.Today, the 33,600-hectare (83,027 acre) Ekuri community forest is adjacent to the 3,000-square-kilometer (1,158-square mile) Oban Division of the Cross River National Park. Its contiguousness provides a buffer zone of restricted use that supports the Park and its vital wildlife populations of endangered species, including forest elephants, grey-necked rockfowl, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, drills, and leopards. It’s also the only site in Nigeria where Preuss’s red colobus monkey and crowned guenon occur.Not long after the Ekuri Initiative came into force, it faced its first real test in 1994.Chief Esira about-turned and agreed to an illicit concession with a logging company which offered to construct the lone access road. Esira was, Ogar told Mongabay, promised “handsome rewards” for his and others’ support.“We came together and said that it wasn’t going to work and called a community meeting where we collectively opposed it vehemently,” said Ogar, then forest manager of the Initiative.The chief was deposed in December 1994. Ogar and five other community members were later prosecuted by the police for obstructing the work on the road.In 1996, a magistrate court judge found the six community members guilty, sentenced them to two-year jail terms with hard labor, and asked that the chief be reinstated. The judge, Ogar said, offered them a chance to escape jail time if they allowed the logging deal to sail through.Tall evergreen trees tower over Ekuri community, which is up ahead, and unseen because it has maintained the tall, functioning forest. Image credit: Linus Unah.“We decided to go to jail and save our forest,” he said. After seven days in prison, they were released on bail. They appealed the judgement, but a high court judge upheld the previous judgement and fined them.Planning for a community forestry programWhile the legal battle dragged on, the Ekuri Initiative became formally registered in 1997, the same year their unpaved road reached New Ekuri. Within the same period, the organization was able to work with consultants to conduct a perimeter survey of the entire Ekuri community forest and design a land use plan, thanks to funding from the Ford Foundation.The plan created different zones, including the protected area, a stream buffer zone, animal movement corridor, non-timber forest product zone, and ecotourism area. The plan, Ogar said, “helped us manage our forest and the resources there because people now know what is permissible and what isn’t and in what area of the forest.” It also helped them determine the exact size of the forest and demarcate land boundaries with other communities.The Cross River gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli), a subspecies of western gorillas, are native to the cross river area on the border of Nigeria and Cameroon. This subspecies is considered critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in part because of its small geographic range. Fewer than 300 remain in the wild. Image credit: Julie Langford with credit to Limbe Wildlife Centre, Cameroon, via Wikimedia Commons CC 3.0.Working with park officials, the Initiative facilitated the training of 32 community members in inventory mapping. Between 1993 and 1997, trainees marked out two 50-hectare (124-acre) plots as timber inventory sites where mature trees were selectively harvested and the proceeds used to support the road construction project and aid their legal battle, which ended in 2003. A federal court in Calabar faulted the judgement of the lower courts and ruled that Ogar and the five others were not guilty.Over the years, the Ekuri Initiative has developed measures to promote sustainable forest management and poverty reduction. All the trees in the forest and on farmlands are communally owned, except those planted by farmers themselves. Only the organization can engage in commercial logging, and individuals can only collect wood to build their homes. Sellers of afang leaves must sell directly to registered buyers, who are charged a registration fee.The Initiative has helped to pay medical bills for community members, offered scholarships to mostly young women, facilitated livelihood skills training programs for the youth, trained farmers and raised cocoa nurseries for them, and organized group micro-credit schemes. It worked with park authorities and other funders to help renovate a school and construct a health facility and a civic center.The Ekuri Initiative is made of the general assembly, a board comprising five members from Old and New Ekuri, and a coordinator who works with different managers to oversee its operations.  The general assembly comprises all community members who meet twice every year to examine challenges faced and unmet targets and craft plans that will guide the operations of the Initiative.For its assiduity with biodiversity conservation and community development, the Ekuri Initiative won the United Nations Equator Initiative Award in 2004 and later became a pilot site for the UN REDD+ program for maintaining its forest.In 2015, state authorities announced plans to build a six-lane, 260-kilometer (162-mile) superhighway that would link a port in the capital city of Calabar to neighboring Benue state in central Nigeria. The original route for proposed for the highway would have crossed about 115 kilometers (71.4-miles) of protected areas, including the heart of the Oban division and about 52 kilometers (32 miles) of Ekuri community forest. The state went further to announce that it would acquire 10-kilometer (6-mile) buffer on each side of the highway.Angered, the Ekuri Initiative convinced the community to rise in protest. Together, the Community promised to resist this incursion and save their forest. Combining forces with international and national conservation groups, including the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Initiative delivered over 253,000 signatures to the federal government. Their petition challenged the 20-kilometer buffer and the entire highway project. They even resorted to litigation.Martins Egot urges conservation groups to transform the lives of communities invested in conservation, to help ensure the sustainability of their efforts. Image credit: Linus Unah.“We need a road, but we don’t want a road that will destroy all of what we have been laboring to protect all these years,” Martins Egot, chairman of the Ekuri Initiative, told Mongabay.Bowing to both local and international pressure, state authorities agreed in early 2017 to reduce the buffer to 140 meters (459 feet) and to re-route the highway away from the national park and the Ekuri community forest. The federal government had rejected three different Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) from Cross River government, and only just granted the state permission to continue with the project once it met a set of conditions.Construction workers resumed highway work late last year, clearing forests in neighboring communities like Okuni and Etara, destroying homes and farmlands without compensation. State authorities are planning to take out a loan of 648.9 billion naira ($1.8 billion) to make sure the superhighway comes to fruition, but analysts say this would only plunge the state into further debt.Funding and other challengesThe threat from the highway to Ekuri lands staved off for now, the Ekuri Initiative continues to struggle to drive community development and poverty reduction. A 2009 state logging moratorium meant that the organization could no longer raise funds from commercial timber sales, and the small budget affects various project components. Local guards patrolling the community forest remain unpaid, and its boundaries, marked more than two decades ago, are in need of another survey.This unpaved road is the only way to access Ekuri villages, and the Community lacks funding to make many needed repairs to ensure safe and sustained use. Image credit: Linus Unah.The dirt road leading to the community remains in a deplorable state, with slopes covered in a craggy terrain filled with stones, muddy puddles, and ruts made by motorcycle wheels.  It’s almost impassable after rain.Inside the villages, most residents live in thatched mud homes, rely on nearby streams and rivers for water and farm mainly cocoa, plantain, banana and bush mango for subsistence.Stephen Egbe, the youth leader of Old Ekuri village, worries that poverty levels are not reducing.“Is conservation a sin?” Egbe asks, pausing to reflect. “If it’s not a sin, I don’t see why we should conserve, and from years to years we remain where we are, without any good infrastructure.”Communities need to see incentives to continue to keep the forest, argued Edwin Ogar, now coordinator of the Calabar-based Wise Administration of Terrestrial Environment and Resources.Stephen Egbe, the youth leader of Old Ekuri village, is troubled that poverty and lack of basic infrastructure are big problems in Ekuri that resource conservation does not help address. Image credit: Linus Unah.The support Ekuri has had over the years came mainly from the international community with barely any support from federal or state authorities, remarked Oliver Enuoh of the University of Calabar’s Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management.“Government [agencies] in Nigeria are not funding conservation activities, and that deprives community forestry management initiatives like the Ekuri Initiative the financial energy it requires to do things right,” said Enuoh, the pioneer coordinator of the Ekuri Initiative.“Conservation itself is not totally opposed to local livelihoods,” he added, “it’s policy, it’s public resource appropriation that appears not to.”Several studies have shown that community participation in wildlife conservation and forest management yields substantial results.  For local communities in Cross River, the forest is a huge part of their existence. They police the forest using local guards, fines, and sometimes banishment for defaulters.Villagers in Ekuri Community want to see more benefits from their community forestry initiative. Without funding to maintain their infrastructure and training programs, people may lose hope and begin using their forest resources more intensively. Image credit: Linus Unah.Similar community efforts in the Mbe Mountains in northern Cross River state and the Buru community forest in northeastern Nigeria’s Taraba state have applied such activities to protect their forest resources. In Buru, for example, a group of committees work together to tackle poaching and stave off illegal rosewood traders.However, Ekuri Community elders fear is that if the government continues to ignore their efforts, forested communities might think conservation does not respect their rights to survival.“It’s really frightening that after 20 years, not much progress has been made,” Egot, Ekuri’s chairman, said. “My message to the government and international conservation groups is that when they show interest in communities that are protecting their forest, then they should go all out to transform lives.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more