The GamesIndustry.biz Podcast: Welcome to the Fampany

first_imgThe GamesIndustry.biz Podcast: Welcome to the FampanyUstwo Games faces union busting allegations, Video Game Tax Relief in the UK under fire, and who else forgot about PlayStation Now?GamesIndustry StaffThursday 10th October 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareHaydn, Chris and Brendan are on hand to talk through some of the latest industry news, starting out with the messy story of Video Game Tax Relief in the UK. It was revealed earlier last week that global games companies had claimed millions upon millions in tax relief, sparking a debate about whether the scheme was working as intended. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Meanwhile, Monument Valley developer Ustwo Games faced accusations of union busting after it allegedly fired key programmer Austin Kelmore over his involvement in Game Workers Unite. Finally, Sony announced a considerable price cut for its game streaming service PlayStation Now, and we discuss Sony’s tendency to merely dabble with new toys, rather than commit wholeheartedly like rival Microsoft. You can listen to our latest episode below, subscribe to our RSS feed, or download the file directly here. It is also available via Spotify, iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Overcast, Player FM, TuneIn and other widely-used podcast platforms.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesPodcast: IO’s independence, with Hakan Abrak | GI Live OnlineHitman studio’s CEO on the journey to self-publishing and achieving the vision for the World of Assassination trilogyBy GamesIndustry Staff 4 days agoCan Returnal pave the way for $70 AAA roguelikes? | PodcastLatest episode also discusses the demand for socially responsible developers, and Toys For Bob’s shift to Call of Duty supportBy GamesIndustry Staff 6 days agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Christopher Bell speeds to victory at Iowa

first_imgNEWTON, Iowa — Christopher Bell knows a lot about long, dominant runs.The seasoned, open-wheel racer won the last three Chili Bowl Nationals in his native, Oklahoma — and led an astounding 186 laps during Sunday’s CircuitCity.com 250 NASCAR Xfinity Series race, cruising to a commanding victory at Iowa Speedway.The driver of the No. 20 Joe Gibbs Racing/Ruud Toyota pulled away from Cole Custer on the final restart with 10 laps to go and powered to his series-leading fourth victory of the season on Father’s Day.RELATED: Race results “Man, I got to win at Dover on Mother’s Day weekend, or, I guess it was the week before with my mom there,” said Bell, who has won five of the past eight short track races in the series. “Now I just won on Father’s Day with my dad here, so it was pretty special.”Custer settled for second and adopted a no-hard-feelings approach to the slight contact from Bell that preceded losing his brief late lead.“I think it was racing,” said Custer, who led the first 53 laps before Bell seized near-total control. “I think every driver will agree that this place puts on the best racing that we go to, so it was fun. Christopher (Bell) and them had the best car all day. I feel like we caught up to them a good amount. We just need a little more time to work on it.” Justin Allgaier — who edged Bell in this race a year ago — took third. Harrison Burton and Zane Smith rounded out the top five. Tyler Reddick, who finished 15th after battling early car trouble, saw his points lead over Bell shaved from 89 to 51.RELATED: Burton pulls double duty at IowaBell has won two straight races at Iowa.“This Ruud Supra was outstanding,” Bell said. “Hopefully we can continue to bring these type of race cars to the race track.”Bell won all three stages. He led 160 consecutive laps at one point, but Custer narrowly edged him in the race off pit road with 28 laps to go. That gave Custer the favored line up high, but Bell eventually found enough grip on the bottom to regain the lead six laps later.Still, he couldn’t fully breathe easy. Custer gamely tried to mount a challenge on the low side, but Bell’s car again proved to be too fast and nimble to be overtaken. Custer posted his eighth top-five finish of the season. Both he and Reddick — who along with Bell make up the series’ so-called “Big Three” in 2019 — own three wins each this season.“We’re close,” Custer said. “We’re just gonna come back better next time.”Bell’s second straight series victory at Iowa ended a streak in which there had been nine different winners in a row at the 0.875-mile track.And other than Custer, no one stood a chance at preventing Bell’s repeat triumph in the heartland.“I think our potential is really high,” Bell said. “Our big track stuff, I feel like we still need to gain on a little bit and obviously we’re working hard to do that. This was a much-needed win.”But what’s the next step? Bell was asked about whether he deserves a Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series ride, but he wouldn’t bite.“My dream was to make a living driving a race car,” Bell said. “And I’ve been able to do that for numerous years now. So if I’m truck racing, sprint car racing, midget racing, I’m already fulfilling my dream. So whether I’m running Xfinity or Cup, I’m living my dream right now, so I’ll be happy.”last_img read more

Curt Andersson Named President of Goodyear’s North American Tire Unit

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  AKRON, Ohio — Curt Andersson has been named president of Goodyear’s North American Tire (NAT) unit, a position that has been “open” since current NAT President Rich Kramer was promoted to COO of the company last year. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Andersson, 48, comes to Goodyear from Crouse-Hinds of Syracuse, N.Y., where he served as president of the Cooper Industries unit. Prior to Crouse-Hinds, Andersson was senior vice president of industrial integration for The Timken Co. in Canton, Ohio, and also held management posts with General Electric (GE). “Curt is a well-rounded business leader with a broad set of experiences who has been tested in a host of markets and businesses,” said Kramer. “He has built and led successful teams. He also has a tremendous understanding of manufacturing, supply chain and sourcing from his experiences with both GE and Timken. Curt brings a successful track record of leading organic sales growth through strong customer orientation and product innovation.”   “I am extremely excited about becoming part of an outstanding leadership team at Goodyear in North America and to be able to provide the leadership and support that will continue the positive momentum of the business,” Andersson said. “I’ve personally spent time with many of the company’s key business leaders and came away impressed with their capabilities, their passion and their results.” (Tire Review),Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

Affordable Apartments

first_imgShortly after being elected Southampton Town supervisor in 2015, Jay Schneiderman announced as one of his goals the creation of more affordable apartments in those areas of town where they were most sorely needed. Now nearly three years after that election, the town board is finally talking about taking some action in that direction.Last week, the town board discussed changes that would allow a property owner with at least a half-acre lot to apply for the right to create an affordable apartment, down from the current requirement that a lot be at least three-quarters of an acre. Among other things, a homeowner wishing to convert part of his or her house into an apartment would be required to apply for a town rental permit and agree to charge no more than the amount capped by federal regulations — currently about $1500 for a one-bedroom apartment.Never mind whether $1500 is a reasonable amount to ask someone to pay for a one-bedroom rental. Rooms in share houses are already at or near those levels. And still people are having a hard time finding a place to lay their head at night. Never mind, too, the question of what has taken the town board so long to finally begin considering what the supervisor said was a top priority shortly after taking office. Like it or not, governments are designed to operate slowly and deliberately, although a little more haste would certainly be appreciated by the many people scrambling to find a place to live. According to a Suffolk County workforce housing study, Southampton Town needs to provide about 6000 more units to meet its current need for affordable housing. Allowing more affordable apartments is never going to bridge that gap. Indeed, in the 16 years the town has had a law on the books allowing accessory apartments, only about 500 property owners have taken advantage of the opportunity. But making it easier for more people to qualify and getting the word out that accessory apartments can be legal is an important first step in easing the affordable housing crisis in town. Sharelast_img read more

Saving Guatemala’s vanishing macaws: Q&A with veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Animals, Birds, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Endangered, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Loss, Parrots, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The northern subspecies of the scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) has disappeared from much of its former range in Mexico and Central America due to habitat loss and wildlife trafficking. Researchers estimate there are between 150 and 200 scarlet macaws remaining in Guatemala.Fire, used to clear land for agriculture, is the biggest driver of habitat loss in Guatemala. So far this year, NASA satellites have detected more than 40,000 fires in Guatemala, many occurring in scarlet macaw habitat.The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) is trying to protect Guatemala’s macaws through a program that monitors nest sites and places lab-hatched chicks in adoptive nests.Mongabay caught up with WCS Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra as he was working in the field in Laguna del Tigre National Park to chat about his work and the outlook for scarlet macaws. Laguna del Tigre National Park sits in the northwest corner of Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve, encompassing about 3,367 square kilometers (1,300 square miles) of jungle, lagoons and ancient ruins. But it is also the site of some of the country’s worst deforestation, losing around 30 percent of its forest cover between 2001 and 2018, according to satellite data collated by the University of Maryland. Just since May, around 60,000 deforestation alerts have been recorded in the national park and more than 180,000 in the reserve.Impoverished rural communities, often with no land of their own, set fire to the jungle in hopes of establishing farms and cattle ranches. Officials in the park say many cattle ranches are also a front for cocaine traffickers, who need large swaths of hidden space to land planes arriving from Colombia and Venezuela. So far this year, NASA satellites have detected more than 40,000 fires in Guatemala, with more recorded in Laguna del Tigre’s municipality of San Andres than in any other municipality in the country. And the vast majority of San Andres fires are happening in the national park.Researchers say the fires spreading across Laguna del Tigre and other parts of the biosphere reserve are having a direct impact on the area’s biodiversity, most notably for the northern subspecies of the scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera). The bird once occupied southern Mexico, as well as Honduras and El Salvador, but its habitat has shrunk significantly. In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its intention to list the subspecies under the Endangered Species Act.All of Guatemala’s scarlet macaws—estimated at 150-200 individuals—now reside within the reserve. But due to the ongoing fires even this small area is under threat. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) is working to recuperate the population through nest observation and laboratory incubation.In May, Mongabay visited the WCS lab at its campsite near the ancient Mayan city of Perú-Waka’ to talk about the fires’ effects on scarlet macaw habitat. There, Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra was finishing up a long day of monitoring macaw chicks in the lab, as well as visiting to nests located high in the canopies of Cantemo trees where full grown birds were flying back and forth in search of food.Lead Medical Veterinarian Luis Fernando Guerra observes a scarlet macaw in the Laguna del Tigre National Park laboratory. Photo courtesy of WCS.Mongabay: Earlier this morning, we visited a scarlet macaw nest less than a mile from camp. The most striking thing about it for me was how close the damage of a recent forest fire had come to the Cantemo tree it chose for its nest—only about thirty feet away. Luis Fernando Guerra: The fires are destroying the primary forest and the regeneration of those forests. Replacing a tree of that size takes years. That’s a problem because scarlet macaws won’t have anywhere else to nest.Mongabay: Losing nests to forest fires appears to be a common occurrence in Laguna del Tigre. Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, it has happened. And in fact that’s why the macaw is such an important species for conservation—because it’s not just conserving those large trees; you also have to conserve a large amount of the surrounding forest and that can help preserve additional species.Satellite data from the University of Maryland picked up more than 60,000 deforestation alerts in Laguna del Tigre National Park between May and June 19 this year. Around 1,000 occurred within about five miles of a monitored scarlet macaw nest site. Source: GLAD/UMD and VIIRS Active Fires, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Mongabay: If we lose all of the Cantemo trees, could the scarlet macaws live in other kinds?Luis Fernando Guerra: Here in Guatemala, about 80 percent of them use those trees. Yes, they can use other trees but they do have their preference.The loss of habitat caused by fires is a big threat to the scarlet macaw population. That nest you visited is a very good nest. It’s active every year. If the fire had taken it, it would have been a great loss because it’s a nest that is active year after year. We always get the chicks to fly from there. It’s very easy to monitor because it’s so close, too.Mongabay: What strategies are WCS taking to help bolster the scarlet macaw population?Luis Fernando Guerra: The idea for ​​us is to work with the populations on-site—which is here in the jungle—and to get more chicks to fly. Normally the macaws put three to four eggs in each nest but not at the same time. The third chick sometimes dies because the macaws are feeding the two older ones, and the smaller one almost never gets food. We’ve started to work a little on species management. We take the third bird, feed it in this laboratory over here and then we look for an adoptive nest, other nests where maybe there is only one chick, of about the same age, and we place the chick there.Wildlife Conservation Society Technician Antonio Xol working with a scarlet macaw chick in the Laguna del Tigre National Park laboratory. Photo courtesy of WCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: But does the mother always accept the new chick? Luis Fernando Guerra: They almost always accept them. We haven’t had problems with them not accepting a chick, or with the macaw not wanting to return to the nest due to human presence. They are a very manageable species.The nesting season starts more or less at the end of January until the end of August, which is when the last chicks finish flying. Then … the nests are checked, the nests are cleaned, some nests are occupied by bees, which is reported. We manage about 90 to 100 nests and then we only work with the active nests. An active nest is one where the macaw lives and lays eggs.In the end, there are an average of about 25 to 30 active nests per season. The idea is that the same number of birds fly each year—keeping it one to one, one chick per nest. That is a good reproduction index for us.Mongabay: Have you seen long-term improvement in their population?Luis Fernando Guerra: There are good and bad years. For example, there are years when the climate is very bad, so the following year, there is little available food and the macaws feed less and have less chicks. But we have seen that with the help of the monitoring we have done, many times we have managed to keep it one to one. So, basically, that’s what we work for.A Scarlet Macaw pokes its head out of its nest in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy ofWCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: We can’t talk about threats to the scarlet macaw without at least mentioning illegal trafficking. Luckily, it appears that the trend has declined in recent years. Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, now it’s very complicated to traffic scarlet macaws. There is a lot of surveillance. But there are areas that we sometimes don’t have access to and that many local community members know well…Obviously there is a lot of trafficking of parrots, not only of macaws, which are both wanted as pets. Most of the market is in Guatemala City, where people want pets. And as long as that market exists, there will always be illegal trafficking.Mongabay: Do you have concerns about the state of the scarlet macaw habitat in areas of the Maya Biosphere Reserve most affected by fires, such as Laguna del Tigre National Park?Luis Fernando Guerra: The importance of the Laguna del Tigre National Park is immense. There is great biodiversity here and the Maya Biosphere Reserve is one of the biggest stretches of forests in Meso-america. I think it’s very important that you fight for its conservation.If the threats continue, they will spread throughout the reserve and cause problems because we are going to lose the biodiversity that exists in Guatemala—plants, animals, all kinds of animals. It is important that people know that all this is here, that this exists. Because many times, people in Guatemala City ask me, “And are there still jaguars? Are there still macaws?” They think there’s nothing left!Wildlife Conservation Society Technician Pedro Díaz checks on a Scarlet Macaw nest in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy ofWCS/Hannah Emde.Mongabay: So many people think the battle has already been lost? Luis Fernando Guerra: Exactly. That’s why it’s important to understand the situation, right? Because people usually say, “Oh, how sad about the fires and all that.” And they believe that everything is lost. But that is only a part of the story.Mongabay: Despite those outside perceptions, do you have hope that attempts to save the scarlet macaw will be successful in years to come?Luis Fernando Guerra: Yes, as long as this forest and possibilities to reproduce and have food exist, yes, the macaw has hope.–Banner image: A scarlet macaw returns to its nest high in a Cantemo Tree in Laguna del Tigre National Park. Photo courtesy of WCS/Estuardo Maldonado.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Audio: David Quammen on ecological restoration, emerging diseases, evolutionary science, and more

first_imgIn a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique — once touted by none other than E.O. Wilson himself, in an interview with Mongabay, as a place where successful restoration efforts were underway and benefitting nature, wildlife, and humans.Another recent focus of Quammen’s work has been emerging diseases — his 2014 book Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, for instance, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases, especially viral diseases like ebola. That made his appearance on the Newscast particularly well-timed, because the day before taping the interview, the World Health Organization announced that an ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become a global health emergency, only the fifth time the WHO has ever made such a declaration.Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted.Here’s this episode’s top news:From over 100,000 species assessments in IUCN update, zero improvementsJune 2019 was the hottest on record: NOAAU.S. Virgin Islands bans coral-damaging sunscreensWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.The lion population in Gorongosa National Park is on the rebound thanks to the Gorongosa Restoration Project. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.In a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. His 2014 book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases. Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted. Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.Listen here: Books, Diseases, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Evolution, Interviews, Interviews With Environmental Journalists, Journalism, National Parks, Podcast, Protected Areas, Restoration, Science last_img read more

Nature-based climate action no longer ‘the forgotten solution’

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki At the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) held in San Francisco last year, nature-based solutions to the climate crisis — like keeping forests standing and restoring degraded ecosystems to enhance their carbon storage potential — were referred to as “the forgotten solution.”Though conservation of forests and other landscapes could be playing a crucial role in mitigating global climate change, renowned conservationist and UN messenger for peace Dr. Jane Goodall, in a speech delivered last September at the GCAS, said she had personally attended a number of conferences where forests went unmentioned. “Saving the forest is one third of the solution,” Goodall said. “We must not let it be the forgotten solution.”That message appears to have been heeded by a number of governments, companies, and civil society groups who committed to major nature-based climate initiatives at the UN Climate Summit held last Monday and the NYC Climate Week that concludes this weekend. At the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) held in San Francisco last year, nature-based solutions to the climate crisis — like keeping forests standing and restoring degraded ecosystems to enhance their carbon storage potential — were referred to as “the forgotten solution.”Technological fixes and high-profile commitments from countries and the private sector draw most of the attention, but researchers have shown that a range of what they call “natural climate solutions” could provide more than a third of the “cost-effective climate mitigation needed between now and 2030” to keep global warming well below 2°Celsius, the goal enshrined in the 2015 Paris Agreement. These natural solutions include a range of “conservation, restoration, and improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands.”One analysis found that just by restoring logged or degraded forests and improving forest management we could remove the equivalent of the emissions from 1.5 billion cars from the atmosphere every year.Rainforest of Cocobolo Nature Reserve, Panama. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Though conservation of forests and other landscapes could be playing a crucial role in mitigating global climate change, renowned conservationist and UN messenger for peace Dr. Jane Goodall, in a speech delivered last September at the GCAS, said she had personally attended a number of conferences where forests went unmentioned.“Saving the forest is one third of the solution,” Goodall said. “We must not let it be the forgotten solution.”That message appears to have been heeded by a number of governments, companies, and civil society groups who committed to major nature-based climate initiatives at the UN Climate Summit held last Monday and the NYC Climate Week that concludes this weekend.For instance, the Central Africa Forest Initiative announced a 10-year agreement between Gabon and Norway that will see the African country receive $150 million in exchange for keeping forests intact and reducing its emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. As part of the partnership, Norway has agreed to pay twice the going rate of carbon, setting a price floor of $10 for each certified ton of emissions reductions achieved by Gabon.Ola Elvestuen, Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment, called the agreement “a major breakthrough for REDD+ in Africa,” referring to the UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. “It properly takes into account Gabon’s special status as a country with high forest cover and low deforestation. Gabon is 88% covered with forests, and I hope our partnership can help them reach their goal to maintain 98% of that for the future,” Elvestuen said.Members of the Batak tribe fishing in Palawan, the Philippines. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Gabon’s Minister of Forest, Seas, Environment and Climate Change, Lee White, said that the partnership could be a model for other countries to follow: “Norway’s agreement to double the price of a ton of rainforest carbon dioxide is highly significant and gives us hope that the international community will move towards a realistic price that will provide a real incentive for rain forest countries to follow our example.”Another initiative, an alliance jointly announced by French President Emmanuel Macron, Colombian President Ivan Duque, and Chilean President Sebastian Piñera at the UN Climate Summit on September 23, aims to protect the Amazon and other tropical forests. The alliance has already been backed by $100 million from the French government and $20 million from the NGO Conservation International. Germany, Norway, and Peru have also signaled their support.At an event in the Central Park Zoo on September 25, five environmental organizations — Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC), Rainforest Foundation Norway (RFN), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and World Resources Institute (WRI) — launched The Forests for Life Partnership, which aims to forestall the degradation of 1 billion hectares of the most intact forests worldwide. The focus of the initiative will be on the intact forests of the Amazon, the Congo Basin, New Guinea, and the northern Boreal zone, as well as smaller intact forests in places like Mesoamerica, Madagascar, and South and Southeast Asia.The founding groups have committed $50 million over the next five years to the Forests For Life Partnership, and plan to secure an additional $200 million in funding from individuals, foundations, corporations, and governments. One of the first major regional efforts supported by the partnership will be the 5 Great Forests of Mesoamerica Initiative, also launched during Climate Week.“The loss of the world’s great forests would prevent any comprehensive response to climate change, and would result in a catastrophic extinction event,” Wes Sechrest, GWC’s CEO and chief scientist, said in a statement. “This is really an opportunity for the countries with these critically important forests to demonstrate global leadership in preventing the climate crisis and stemming biodiversity loss by protecting their own natural heritage.”Helmeted Iguana, Corytophanes cristatus, in the rainforest of Cocobolo Nature Reserve, Panama. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Institutional investors are getting in on the nature-based climate action as well. In response to the fires in the Brazilian and Bolivian Amazon, the week before the Climate Summit some 230 global investors who collectively manage $16.2 trillion in assets issued a statement putting hundreds of unnamed companies on notice that they must meet the commitments they’ve made to root deforestation out of their commodities supply chains or face economic consequences. At the UN Climate Summit, a group of international investors went a step further by launching the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance. Members of the Alliance, who together manage more than $2.4 trillion in investments, committed to making their investment portfolios carbon-neutral by 2050.If these statements and alliances were warning shots from investors, at least some producers of agricultural commodities appear to have received the message. Together with 19 “agriculture-centric companies” like Danone, Nestlé, and Unilever, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development launched a new initiative “to develop innovative solutions aimed at protecting and enhancing biodiversity” in commodities supply chains.“The global food and agricultural ecosystem is critically dependent on biodiversity: from soil regeneration through to water filtration, pest control and pollination, among many of the other building blocks of life on earth,” Emmanuel Faber, Chairman and CEO of Danone, said while announcing the One Planet Business for Biodiversity initiative on stage at the Climate Summit. “According to many recent scientific studies, we have ten years to reset our course and bend the curve on climate change and wild and cultivated biodiversity loss.”These are just a few of the coalitions and partnerships announced in the past week that put preserving and restoring nature at the center of climate action. Many countries are making nature-based commitments within their own borders, as well.New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said at the Climate Summit that her country is “determined to show that New Zealand can and will be the most sustainable food producer in the world.” Over the next five years, Ardern said, her government “will collaborate to build systems that every farmer will be able to use to measure, manage and reduce their own farm’s emissions.”A river wends it way toward the Caribbean sea, Guatemala. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.New Zealand has also pledged to plant a billion trees by 2028, with 150 million of those already in the ground. Ethiopia has pledged to plant 4 billion trees a year. Nigeria says it will employ youth to plant 25 million trees. Pakistan committed to planting 10 billion new trees over the next five years. Sierra Leone committed to planting 100 million trees by 2023. Kenya aims to plant 2 billion trees by 2022, and restore 5.1 million hectares (12.6 million acres) of forest. Guatemala intends to restore 1.5 million hectares (3.7 million acres) of forest by 2022. Colombia plans to restore 300,000 hectares (741,000 acre) of forest by 2022 and place 900,000 hectares (2.2 million acres) of land under agroforestry or sustainable forest management.In discussing why he was convening the Climate Summit, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said, “We need to cut greenhouse emissions by 45% by 2030. We need carbon neutrality by 2050. … That is why I am telling leaders don’t come to the Summit with beautiful speeches. Come with concrete plans — clear steps to enhance nationally determined contributions by 2020 — and strategies for carbon neutrality by 2050.”Whether or not countries have truly risen to Guterres’ call for more ambitious climate action remains to be seen. When they signed the Paris Agreement in 2015, countries agreed to ratchet up their ambition every 5 years, meaning they must submit new Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), nation-specific climate action plans, at next year’s UN Climate Change Conference.“The measurable outcomes of the Summit will be in next year’s NDCs,” Caleb McCLennen, Vice President for Global Conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Society, told Mongabay.But one thing that is clear is that nature-based climate solutions are finally going mainstream.“In California, nature-based solutions were branded the forgotten solution,” McClennen said. “Now they’re being implemented by commitments. It feels like it shifted from exposing the issue to, this year, political leaders and projects on the ground really making it happen.”Wallace’s Flying Frog, Rhacaphorus nigropalmatus, in the Borneo Highlands of Sarawak. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.CITATION• Griscom, B. W., Adams, J., Ellis, P. W., Houghton, R. A., Lomax, G., Miteva, D. A., … & Woodbury, P. (2017). Natural climate solutions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(44), 11645-11650. doi:10.1073/pnas.1710465114Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Climate Science, Deforestation, Environment, forest degradation, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Mitigation, Redd last_img read more

As the Amazon burns, Colombia’s forests decimated for cattle and coca

first_imgThe environmental corridor that connects the Amazon, the Orinoquía and the Andes mountain range is in danger as a result of the ongoing deforestation.Tinigua National Natural Park lost 16,000 hectares (39,500 acres) between 2017 and July 2019, almost all of it primary forest, while the other parks also lost significant amounts of forest.The analysis identifies the main cause of the deforestation as the conversion of forests to pastures for land grabbing and livestock ranching, by invaders taking advantage of the scant government presence in the region. The last few weeks have been critical for the Amazon in Brazil and Bolivia. Fires in August razed thousands of hectares of forest and drew the attention of the international community.Neighboring Colombia hasn’t been spared either. Although the fire season here usually occurs in January and February, there has been a surge in deforestation, especially in the country’s northwestern Amazon region. Protected areas of vital importance to indigenous communities and the Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía ecological corridor have also been affected.Deforestation has strongly impacted national parks such as Sierra de la Macarena, Tinigua, Chiribiquete and Nukak, according to the latest report from the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), an initiative of the Amazon Conservation Association (ACCA) in collaboration with the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS) in Colombia.Colombia lost nearly 200,000 hectares (almost 500,000 acres) of forest in 2018, according to the Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies (known by its Spanish acronym IDEAM). And while that figure is down 10 percent from 2017, national parks are still in danger. The municipality of La Macarena, for example, registered the greatest surge in deforestation in the whole country (an increase of 26 percent), with almost half “occurring inside Tinigua park,” says Rodrigo Botero, director of the FCDS.A map showing deforestation inside protected areas, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.Loss of primary forestThe drop in deforestation in 2018 doesn’t mask the fact that 478,000 hectares (1.18 million acres) of forest were lost in the Colombian Amazon in the three years between 2016 and 2018. Nearly three-quarters of this was primary forest.According to GLAD alerts from satellite data collated by the University of Maryland, another 60,600 hectares [150,000 acres] were lost during the first seven months of 2019. Of that, 75 percent was primary forest. The MAAP report shows that this year’s loss of forest has occurred mainly inside four protected areas in the northwest of the Colombian Amazon: Tinigua, Serranía de Chiribiquete and Sierra de la Macarena national parks, and Nukak National Natural Reserve.Burned areas and roads in the middle of the Amazon. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).Among the highlights of the study: 29,000 hectares (71,700 acres) deforested in the four protected areas from 2016 to 2018; 4,300 hectares (10,600 acres) cleared by the end of July 2019Tinigua National Park was the hardest hit: 16,000 hectares (39,500 acres) were lost between 2017 and July 2019, with a peak in 2018. Chiribiquete lost 2,600 hectares (6,400 acres) since its expansion in July 2018, 96 percent of it primary forest.A large proportion of deforestation occurs in pristine forests where the flora and fauna are usually poorly studied. According to experts, these areas can take centuries to recover, if at all.“Primary forest, in this case, is described as a mature natural tropical rainforest that has not been completely cleared or has been regenerated in recent history (30-50 years). In reality, and most cases, they are probably forests that have never been cleared. So, we are talking about super-intact forests with all its biodiversity which if lost, may never be replaced,” says Matt Finer, director of the MAAP.The question now is why this is happening in protected areas of great biological and ecological importance. After the signing of a peace agreement between guerrillas from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the government in 2016, he guerrilla groups left the Amazon. Their departure and the lack of government presence in these areas facilitated land grabbing by large landowners and other illegal armed groups.“The highest rates of deforestation in Amazonian national parks are found in ones with no presence of park officials. They have either been displaced from the area or evacuated due to threats against them,” says Botero from the FCDS.The environmental sector has weak governance, he says, which limits park monitoring by officials and their work with communities. These factors “enable deforestation in these areas,” Botero says. One of the most worrisome things for experts is seeing illegal land transactions within indigenous areas, national parks, forest reserves and community reserves.A map of deforestation hotspots in the Colombian Amazon, based on data from UMD/GLAD, RUNAP, RAISG.Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía corridor in dangerThe MAAP analysis identifies three critical deforestation areas in the northwestern Colombian Amazon: the convergence zone between Tinigua, La Macarena and Chiribiquete national parks; the western sector of the Chiribiquete park expansion zone; and the northwestern segment of Nukak National Natural Reserve.In all cases, there is a common deforestation driver. “The main cause in the region is the conversion to pastures for land grabbing and livestock,” Finer says.Colombian Amazon landscape after cleared areas have been set on fire. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).A map showing deforestation in the Tinigua, Serranía de Chiribiquete and Sierra de la Macarena national parks as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.According to the FCDS, the southern area of Tinigua National Natural Park has been persistently encroached on during the past three years. The best preserved area is located north of the Guayabero River. However, this small fragment of forest owes part of its conservation to the presence of armed groups — the FARC previously, and dissidents today. That’s why this area has not yet been colonized or destroyed.Loss of primary forest in Tinigua jumped by nearly 400 percent between 2017 and 2018, to almost 12,000 hectares (30,000 acres), according to a graph in the MAAP report. There’s been a consistent increase in forest loss in Sierra de la Macarena since 2016, and the trend seems to have caught on in Tinigua, leading to the fragmentation of the Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía corridor.“In La Macarena, the deforestation axis has [been] heavily concentrated along the cattle trail. This generates disconnection between the Amazonian plain — between the Guayabero and Cafre rivers — and the mountain range,” Botero says. For him, the negative impacts are getting bigger, not only because they obstruct species migration but also because they damage environmental services, affecting rainfall and water regulation capacity. “We are already seeing droughts and a decrease in surface runoff in the area.”A map showing deforestation in Serranía de Chiribiquete National Natural Park’s western sector, as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.A map showing deforestation in Nukak National Natural Reserve as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.Overflights and satellite data have been essential in evaluating the speed at which the expansion of the agricultural frontier in Tinigua and La Macarena is occurring, especially areas targeted for medium and large-scale livestock ranching. Coca crops are also present in some sectors of La Macarena; the illicit crops have also been found in the Nukak reserve, surrounding the Inírida River. The environmental damage in this area is not only due to deforestation but also to water contamination by chemical waste dumping into the river.For Botero, Colombia is not in the clear even though deforestation in the Amazon decreased by nearly 6,000 hectares (14,800 acres) between 2017 and 2018, according to IDEAM data. The decrease, however, is still very small compared to the 138,176 hectares (341,440 acres) that were lost last year. “Because every year we have less forest, the impact of deforestation is increasing,” he says. “The question is: has the forest been recovering?”Deforestation trends since 2015 in the four protected areas, based on data from Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP. Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, coca plantations, Deforestation, Featured, Forests, Illegal Logging, National Parks, Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Tropical Forests A deforested landscape the northern Amazon of Colombia. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).Deforestation in Colombia, coupled with the fires in the Bolivian and Brazilian Amazon, poses new challenges for all countries that share the biome. In Colombia, experts believe that fighting deforestation is a governance issue that cannot be solved solely through the military-led enforcement approach of Operation Artemisa. The critical issue, they say, is access to land.“If you do not recover the lands from the people who grabbed more than half a million hectares of the Amazon in recent years, then impunity becomes a stimulus for crime, and therefore, thousands of hectares will continue to enter the illegal land market in Colombia,” Botero says.Banner image of burned land in the Colombian Amazon, where the fire season usually occurs between January and February. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).This is a translated version of a story that was first published in Spanish on Aug. 26, 2019. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Companies’ solutions to global plastic crisis miss the mark: Report

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon A new report from Greenpeace contends that multinational consumer goods companies are addressing the global plastics crisis with “false solutions.”Some of those solutions, the group says, harm the environment, such as the replacement of plastic straws with paper ones.Others, such as bioplastics, amount to little more than greenwashing, the report’s author writes, as they don’t provide the purported benefits compared to conventional plastics.Greenpeace argues for the phaseout of single-use packaging and investments in developing reusable containers that would substantially cut down on plastic waste. A new report from the environmental organization Greenpeace warns that large companies are only deepening the world’s plastic crisis, even as they voice support for supposed solutions.“Due to public concern about the plastic pollution crisis worldwide, we are witnessing a parade of corporations scrambling to look greener by putting forward false solutions to justify their addiction to single-use packaging,” Graham Forbes, a global project leader with Greenpeace USA, said in a statement.Our plastic trash is swamping ecosystems around the world. Oceans, in particular, are bearing the brunt of our habit of tossing away the plastic wrappers, boxes and sleeves that hold our food and other goods. The World Economic Forum figures that, in the two minutes it’s taken to read the first paragraphs of this story, two truckloads of plastic have found their way into the world’s oceans. Once there, it snags unsuspecting marine life, releases harmful chemicals into the water, and splinters into tiny pieces that end up in our food and water sources.Gannets trapped in a nest of plastic. Image by Engelberger via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0).In response, the global companies that, according to Greenpeace, produce much of the waste that turns up on beaches and floats in the open ocean have looked for alternatives to the typical plastic that’s manufactured from fossil fuels. But the replacements fall short of the goal of cutting plastic waste, Greenpeace says, as trends show growing, not shrinking, demand for disposable packaging.“Despite the increasing scientific understanding of the irreversible damage plastic can cause to our environment and communities, plastic production is projected to dramatically increase in the coming years,” Ivy Schlegel, a senior research specialist with Greenpeace USA and the author of the Oct. 1 report, said in the statement.Some companies have moved to replace plastic cups and straws with paper versions. But to Schlegel, that’s just swapping out one unacceptable material for another.“Multinational consumer goods companies continue to promote so-called sustainable alternatives that would put unacceptable pressures on natural resources such as forests and agricultural land, which have already been overexploited,” she said.Country-by-country waste generation in kilograms per day. Image by Kaza et al., 2018, via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0 igo).Bioplastics are another touted replacement for traditional plastics, but so far, there’s no agreed-upon standard for what bioplastics are, Schlegel writes. It could mean that the base material is derived from plant material like corn or sugarcane instead of fossil fuels, but that’s not always the case. Manufacturers of other plastics in these categories claim they’re biodegradable or compostable, without specifying the sometimes unusual conditions — including high temperature and specific humidity levels — necessary to break them down.Products labeled as recycled or recyclable might hide similarly involved processes necessary to convert them something usable. And China’s decision in 2018 to stop recycling plastic has meant that the U.S. and other Western countries now must grapple with what to do with all of the trash they produce, raising fears that much of it will end up in landfills or worse. According to Greenpeace, less than 10 percent of all of the plastic that’s ever been manufactured has been recycled.Other solutions, like using chemicals to break down plastic trash or burning it to produce energy, come with their own suite of problems, the report says.“Moving to bioplastic, paper, 100% ‘recyclable’ packaging, incineration and chemical recycling all but guarantee this environmental crisis will get worse,” Forbes said.Microfiber plastics found in the ocean. Image by M.Danny25 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Cleaning up the world’s plastic problem will require a more fundamental shift by these companies, Greenpeace contends.“To solve the plastic pollution crisis, companies need to rethink how products are delivered to consumers and invest significantly in reusable and refillable delivery systems,” Schlegel said.That strategy may mean using other materials that hold up better over time or don’t come with the issues that plastic or current replacements like paper present.“We will only see real change when companies like Nestlé, Unilever, Coca-Cola, and PepsiCo, which profit from single-use models, end their expanding plastic use and invest heavily in systems that prioritize reuse,” Forbes said.Banner image of plastic trash on a beach in Ghana by Muntaka Chasant via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Role In Conservation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporations, Environment, Green, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Recycling, Water, Water Pollution last_img read more

Research points to low forensic capacity to tackle timber fraud in U.S.

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon New research has found that more than 60 percent of a sample of 73 wood products in the U.S. had misrepresented or fraudulent species labels.While not “statistically representative,” the findings do indicate that improperly labeled wood is a concern in the U.S.The study also found that the U.S. does not have the capacity for forensic wood anatomy identification to address this issue. A recent study suggests that a lot of fraudulently or inaccurately identified wood turns up in products on the U.S. market and that inspectors’ capacity to root out these issues is lacking.“We know some wood products are intentionally mislabeled, sometimes to pass off lower-value wood for more expensive varieties, and sometimes to cover up the fact that it was illegally sourced,” Amy Smith, deputy director of forests with the WWF and a co-author of the study, said in a statement shared with Mongabay. “We wanted to know how often this fraud occurs, and our study indicates it could be alarmingly common.”The first-ever research, published July 25 in the journal PLOS ONE, found that more than 60 percent of the 73 types of wood products tested, including furniture, musical instruments and other common products, had some evidence of fraud or misrepresentation. In more than half of the samples, the wood was labeled with the wrong species. About 20 percent of the samples had the wrong “product type” label — for example, that the item was solid wood when, in reality, it was a veneer fastened to non-solid wood like particleboard.Alex Wiedenhoeft uses an extremely sharp knife to cut thin strips of wood. Image © James Schnepf/WWF-US.Though some of these issues could be chalked up to “honest mistakes,” these levels of misrepresentation indicate the problem is “non-trivial” in the U.S. timber market, the authors write.But Alex Wiedenhoeft, a research botanist with the U.S. Forest Service and the lead author of the study, said the team did not select the products they tested randomly. Nor did they identify the trees used in enough individual pieces to suggest that more than half of the products available are somehow tainted.As such, the results of the study don’t “represent a statistically representative slice, because the scale of doing that is beyond the scope of any laboratory that I’m aware of,” said Wiedenhoeft, who is also a professor at the University of Wisconsin.What it does indicate is that laboratory forensic testing, at least at the detailed level in this research, can only be a part of the solution to ridding the market of mislabeled wood and goods.Wiedenhoeft uses a microscope to examine a wood sample. Image © James Schnepf/WWF-US.“One of the things that we’ve documented here is that we don’t have the human capacity” for large-scale forensic testing, Wiedenhoeft told Mongabay.The team used lists of “high-risk” tree species compiled by WWF and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES, to select products containing those species. They then examined the cellular structure of the wood using a hand lens or a microscope, complementing this “wood anatomy” investigation with ultraviolet fluorescence scans and water and alcohol extracts. Using a set of keys, databases and comparisons to on-hand collections, the researchers then identified the species of wood in each product.A survey of experts in wood anatomy around the country demonstrated that there’s limited capacity for forensic wood anatomy in the U.S., given that the country imports more than $51 billion worth of timber products every year. That doesn’t mean that forensic testing shouldn’t be part of the arsenal aimed at stopping fraudulent labeling or illegal logging alongside traditional law enforcement, Wiedenhoeft said.These slivers of wood are carefully stored and cataloged for cross-reference. Image © James Schnepf/WWF-US.“I don’t think our goal is likely to be 100 percent inspection,” he said, “but I don’t think that means that this stuff has no way to make a difference.”He explained that field inspectors, perhaps at ports or working in company warehouses, could learn the basics of wood anatomy well enough to discern whether a type of wood hasn’t been appropriately labeled or may come from a suspicious source in many cases. Even this “field level screening” could be a deterrent to fraud and misrepresentation, Wiedenhoeft added.He and his colleagues are working on an imaging device that inspectors can use in the field with a laptop computer that harnesses the power of mathematical models to identify wood species within about a second. The models the device uses are context- and location-dependent, so the one they’ve recently deployed in Ghana has to sort through just the species typically found there.Still, Wiedenhoeft said, “We’re pretty excited about that.”The Center for Wood Anatomy Research contains the world’s largest research wood collection, with samples from all over the planet. Image © James Schnepf/WWF-US.WWF’s Smith said the research demonstrates the U.S.’s role in the connected issues of deforestation and illegal logging, which are leading to the destruction of forests around the world.“It sounds like a far-off problem, but this illegal wood ends up in US-based products we buy and use every day,” Smith said. The researchers pointed out that more than one-fifth of imported wood and wood furniture ends up in the U.S., double what China, the next country on the list, imports.“That means it’s our responsibility as consumers to demand legally and responsibly sourced forest products,” she said.Wiedenhoeft uses a wet paintbrush to move the delicate sample to a slide for examination. Image © James Schnepf/WWF-US.Smith recommends that consumers buy products that carry the Forest Stewardship Council certification label, as well as “letting businesses and policy makers know that enforcement of our import laws — plus investment in technologies to detect fraud.”That could potentially decrease the chances that the wood products people buy in the U.S. are improperly or fraudulently labeled. But the authors also caution that “as yet we have no scholarly data to support the reliability of botanical claims or product-type claims in products from these systems.”Banner image of U.S. Forest Service forensics lab team sample drawers © James Schnepf/WWF-US.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitation:Wiedenhoeft, A. C., Simeone, J., Smith, A., Parker-Forney, M., Soares, R., & Fishman, A. (2019). Fraud and misrepresentation in retail forest products exceeds U.S. forensic wood science capacity. PLOS ONE, 14(7), e0219917. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0219917FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Botany, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Forest People, Forest Stewardship Council, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Logging, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Timber Laws, timber trade, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more