Audio: David Quammen on ecological restoration, emerging diseases, evolutionary science, and more

first_imgIn a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique — once touted by none other than E.O. Wilson himself, in an interview with Mongabay, as a place where successful restoration efforts were underway and benefitting nature, wildlife, and humans.Another recent focus of Quammen’s work has been emerging diseases — his 2014 book Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, for instance, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases, especially viral diseases like ebola. That made his appearance on the Newscast particularly well-timed, because the day before taping the interview, the World Health Organization announced that an ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become a global health emergency, only the fifth time the WHO has ever made such a declaration.Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted.Here’s this episode’s top news:From over 100,000 species assessments in IUCN update, zero improvementsJune 2019 was the hottest on record: NOAAU.S. Virgin Islands bans coral-damaging sunscreensWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.The lion population in Gorongosa National Park is on the rebound thanks to the Gorongosa Restoration Project. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.In a recent piece for National Geographic, where he is a regular contributor, Quammen profiles Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. His 2014 book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, looks at the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases. Quammen’s most recent book, 2018’s The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, explores the revolution in how scientists understand the history of evolution on Earth sparked by the work of Carl Woese.David Quammen appears on the Mongabay Newscast to discuss all of the above as well as what gives him hope that biodiversity loss and destruction of the natural world can be halted. Today we speak with award-winning science writer, author, and journalist David Quammen about some of the most promising and fascinating trends in conservation and evolutionary science.Listen here: Books, Diseases, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Evolution, Interviews, Interviews With Environmental Journalists, Journalism, National Parks, Podcast, Protected Areas, Restoration, Science last_img read more

Ekuri Initiative: Inside a Nigerian community’s battle to keep its forest

first_imgBiodiversity, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Deforestation, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Ekuri Community in southeastern Nigeria started an initiative in the early 1990s to manage their community forest adjacent to the Cross River National Park, home to the critically-endangered Cross River gorilla and a suite of other unique and threatened species.Formalized through the Ekuri Initiative, planned community forest management has helped to drive local development, conservation, sustainable forest management and address poverty by improving access to sustainable livelihoods.The Initiative has resisted threats from logging companies and more recently attempts by state authorities to build a 260-km superhighway that would have destroyed much of the community forest.However, community leaders worry that if state and national governments continue to ignore their efforts, villagers might think conservation efforts do not respect their rights to survival. LAGOS, NIGERIA — Surrounded by smoke-capped dense forest thick with tall, evergreen trees and wildlife, the Ekuri people in southeastern Nigeria’s Cross River state treasure the forest near their homes.From there, they have for decades obtained plants for medicine; water for drinking and washing; vegetables, fruits and seeds for food; and other products such as timber, rattan, and bamboo for roofing and furniture.A woman in Old Ekuri extracts bush mango seeds from the shells. The forest provides income and food for many villagers here in the Ekuri Community. Image credit: Linus Unah.But they had a problem.Old Ekuri and New Ekuri villages, collectively known as Ekuri Community, had no access road between them, only a footpath cutting through the forest. People trekked for up to four hours, oftentimes with headloads or goods wedged on their shoulders, as they moved to or returned from local markets.Villagers’ longing for an access road in the 1980s drove the community to consider granting a concession to a logging company to harvest timber and build a motorway in return.However, Chief Otey Esira, village head of New Ekuri, argued against this arrangement and, since both villages have equal ownership of the forest, the deal fell through without his support. Esira exhorted the people to maintain the forest and shared stories of neighboring communities whose forests were destroyed after logging companies received concessions.“Why not keep our forests so that they can continue to yield the benefits we have seen over the centuries?” Edwin Ogar, from New Ekuri, recalled the chief saying at that time.It takes a CommunityIn 1986, the Community itself started building this 40-kilometer (24-mile) stretch of road. They raised funds from levies collected from buyers of forest products like the highly sought-after afang (Gnetum africanum) leaves. Community members made financial contributions or offered any valuable materials that would aid the construction.The access road reached Old Ekuri in 1990, connecting the two villages and providing market access to residents, most of whom farm several crops, for subsistence and for sale. Image credit: Linus Unah.By the time this untarred road reached Old Ekuri in 1990, plans were underway to establish the Cross River National Park. The Community requested to manage their forest on their own. After they received approval from park authorities, the idea of forming a community-based organization, endorsed by village elders since the 1980s, crystallized into the now popular Ekuri Initiative in 1992.The aim was to have a vehicle that would drive community development, conservation, sustainable forest management and address poverty by improving access to sustainable livelihoods. The Initiative took on the road construction project and built about four bridges and several culverts along the path.Today, the 33,600-hectare (83,027 acre) Ekuri community forest is adjacent to the 3,000-square-kilometer (1,158-square mile) Oban Division of the Cross River National Park. Its contiguousness provides a buffer zone of restricted use that supports the Park and its vital wildlife populations of endangered species, including forest elephants, grey-necked rockfowl, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, drills, and leopards. It’s also the only site in Nigeria where Preuss’s red colobus monkey and crowned guenon occur.Not long after the Ekuri Initiative came into force, it faced its first real test in 1994.Chief Esira about-turned and agreed to an illicit concession with a logging company which offered to construct the lone access road. Esira was, Ogar told Mongabay, promised “handsome rewards” for his and others’ support.“We came together and said that it wasn’t going to work and called a community meeting where we collectively opposed it vehemently,” said Ogar, then forest manager of the Initiative.The chief was deposed in December 1994. Ogar and five other community members were later prosecuted by the police for obstructing the work on the road.In 1996, a magistrate court judge found the six community members guilty, sentenced them to two-year jail terms with hard labor, and asked that the chief be reinstated. The judge, Ogar said, offered them a chance to escape jail time if they allowed the logging deal to sail through.Tall evergreen trees tower over Ekuri community, which is up ahead, and unseen because it has maintained the tall, functioning forest. Image credit: Linus Unah.“We decided to go to jail and save our forest,” he said. After seven days in prison, they were released on bail. They appealed the judgement, but a high court judge upheld the previous judgement and fined them.Planning for a community forestry programWhile the legal battle dragged on, the Ekuri Initiative became formally registered in 1997, the same year their unpaved road reached New Ekuri. Within the same period, the organization was able to work with consultants to conduct a perimeter survey of the entire Ekuri community forest and design a land use plan, thanks to funding from the Ford Foundation.The plan created different zones, including the protected area, a stream buffer zone, animal movement corridor, non-timber forest product zone, and ecotourism area. The plan, Ogar said, “helped us manage our forest and the resources there because people now know what is permissible and what isn’t and in what area of the forest.” It also helped them determine the exact size of the forest and demarcate land boundaries with other communities.The Cross River gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli), a subspecies of western gorillas, are native to the cross river area on the border of Nigeria and Cameroon. This subspecies is considered critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in part because of its small geographic range. Fewer than 300 remain in the wild. Image credit: Julie Langford with credit to Limbe Wildlife Centre, Cameroon, via Wikimedia Commons CC 3.0.Working with park officials, the Initiative facilitated the training of 32 community members in inventory mapping. Between 1993 and 1997, trainees marked out two 50-hectare (124-acre) plots as timber inventory sites where mature trees were selectively harvested and the proceeds used to support the road construction project and aid their legal battle, which ended in 2003. A federal court in Calabar faulted the judgement of the lower courts and ruled that Ogar and the five others were not guilty.Over the years, the Ekuri Initiative has developed measures to promote sustainable forest management and poverty reduction. All the trees in the forest and on farmlands are communally owned, except those planted by farmers themselves. Only the organization can engage in commercial logging, and individuals can only collect wood to build their homes. Sellers of afang leaves must sell directly to registered buyers, who are charged a registration fee.The Initiative has helped to pay medical bills for community members, offered scholarships to mostly young women, facilitated livelihood skills training programs for the youth, trained farmers and raised cocoa nurseries for them, and organized group micro-credit schemes. It worked with park authorities and other funders to help renovate a school and construct a health facility and a civic center.The Ekuri Initiative is made of the general assembly, a board comprising five members from Old and New Ekuri, and a coordinator who works with different managers to oversee its operations.  The general assembly comprises all community members who meet twice every year to examine challenges faced and unmet targets and craft plans that will guide the operations of the Initiative.For its assiduity with biodiversity conservation and community development, the Ekuri Initiative won the United Nations Equator Initiative Award in 2004 and later became a pilot site for the UN REDD+ program for maintaining its forest.In 2015, state authorities announced plans to build a six-lane, 260-kilometer (162-mile) superhighway that would link a port in the capital city of Calabar to neighboring Benue state in central Nigeria. The original route for proposed for the highway would have crossed about 115 kilometers (71.4-miles) of protected areas, including the heart of the Oban division and about 52 kilometers (32 miles) of Ekuri community forest. The state went further to announce that it would acquire 10-kilometer (6-mile) buffer on each side of the highway.Angered, the Ekuri Initiative convinced the community to rise in protest. Together, the Community promised to resist this incursion and save their forest. Combining forces with international and national conservation groups, including the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Initiative delivered over 253,000 signatures to the federal government. Their petition challenged the 20-kilometer buffer and the entire highway project. They even resorted to litigation.Martins Egot urges conservation groups to transform the lives of communities invested in conservation, to help ensure the sustainability of their efforts. Image credit: Linus Unah.“We need a road, but we don’t want a road that will destroy all of what we have been laboring to protect all these years,” Martins Egot, chairman of the Ekuri Initiative, told Mongabay.Bowing to both local and international pressure, state authorities agreed in early 2017 to reduce the buffer to 140 meters (459 feet) and to re-route the highway away from the national park and the Ekuri community forest. The federal government had rejected three different Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) from Cross River government, and only just granted the state permission to continue with the project once it met a set of conditions.Construction workers resumed highway work late last year, clearing forests in neighboring communities like Okuni and Etara, destroying homes and farmlands without compensation. State authorities are planning to take out a loan of 648.9 billion naira ($1.8 billion) to make sure the superhighway comes to fruition, but analysts say this would only plunge the state into further debt.Funding and other challengesThe threat from the highway to Ekuri lands staved off for now, the Ekuri Initiative continues to struggle to drive community development and poverty reduction. A 2009 state logging moratorium meant that the organization could no longer raise funds from commercial timber sales, and the small budget affects various project components. Local guards patrolling the community forest remain unpaid, and its boundaries, marked more than two decades ago, are in need of another survey.This unpaved road is the only way to access Ekuri villages, and the Community lacks funding to make many needed repairs to ensure safe and sustained use. Image credit: Linus Unah.The dirt road leading to the community remains in a deplorable state, with slopes covered in a craggy terrain filled with stones, muddy puddles, and ruts made by motorcycle wheels.  It’s almost impassable after rain.Inside the villages, most residents live in thatched mud homes, rely on nearby streams and rivers for water and farm mainly cocoa, plantain, banana and bush mango for subsistence.Stephen Egbe, the youth leader of Old Ekuri village, worries that poverty levels are not reducing.“Is conservation a sin?” Egbe asks, pausing to reflect. “If it’s not a sin, I don’t see why we should conserve, and from years to years we remain where we are, without any good infrastructure.”Communities need to see incentives to continue to keep the forest, argued Edwin Ogar, now coordinator of the Calabar-based Wise Administration of Terrestrial Environment and Resources.Stephen Egbe, the youth leader of Old Ekuri village, is troubled that poverty and lack of basic infrastructure are big problems in Ekuri that resource conservation does not help address. Image credit: Linus Unah.The support Ekuri has had over the years came mainly from the international community with barely any support from federal or state authorities, remarked Oliver Enuoh of the University of Calabar’s Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management.“Government [agencies] in Nigeria are not funding conservation activities, and that deprives community forestry management initiatives like the Ekuri Initiative the financial energy it requires to do things right,” said Enuoh, the pioneer coordinator of the Ekuri Initiative.“Conservation itself is not totally opposed to local livelihoods,” he added, “it’s policy, it’s public resource appropriation that appears not to.”Several studies have shown that community participation in wildlife conservation and forest management yields substantial results.  For local communities in Cross River, the forest is a huge part of their existence. They police the forest using local guards, fines, and sometimes banishment for defaulters.Villagers in Ekuri Community want to see more benefits from their community forestry initiative. Without funding to maintain their infrastructure and training programs, people may lose hope and begin using their forest resources more intensively. Image credit: Linus Unah.Similar community efforts in the Mbe Mountains in northern Cross River state and the Buru community forest in northeastern Nigeria’s Taraba state have applied such activities to protect their forest resources. In Buru, for example, a group of committees work together to tackle poaching and stave off illegal rosewood traders.However, Ekuri Community elders fear is that if the government continues to ignore their efforts, forested communities might think conservation does not respect their rights to survival.“It’s really frightening that after 20 years, not much progress has been made,” Egot, Ekuri’s chairman, said. “My message to the government and international conservation groups is that when they show interest in communities that are protecting their forest, then they should go all out to transform lives.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

‘Like spaghetti’: Worm-slurping, hopping rats discovered in the Philippines

first_imgRickart, E. A., Balete, D. S., Timm, R. M., Alviola, P. A., Esselstyn, J. A., & Heaney, L. R. (2019). Two new species of shrew-rats (Rhynchomys: Muridae: Rodentia) from Luzon Island, Philippines. Journal of Mammalogy, 100(4), 1112-1129, doi:10.1093/jmammal/gyz066Heaney, L. R., Balete, D. S., & Rickart, E. A. (2016). The Mammals of Luzon Island: Biogeography and Natural History of a Philippine Fauna. Baltimore, MD: JHU Press. The highly biodiverse island of Luzon in the Philippines has yielded up two species of rats new to science.Both are found high up on Luzon’s mountains, where they’ve evolved to feed on the earthworms that abound in the lush, wet habitat.Researchers say they hope the new discoveries, the latest of dozens made here since 2000, will help shine a spotlight on the importance of conserving Luzon’s unique habitats and wildlife. As you explore the high altitudes of Luzon Island in the Philippines, you’ll encounter plenty of earthworms. There’s an abundance of them. So the ecosystem did exactly what nature does to bring balance: it evolved predators. And the most common earthworm predators here are rats. Two of them, in fact, are new to science, having only just been described in a paper published in July.“They’re quite bizarre,” says lead author Eric Rickart, a curator at the Natural History Museum of Utah, University of Utah. “They hop around on their sturdy hind legs and large hind feet, almost like little kangaroos. They have long, delicate snouts, and almost no chewing teeth.”The scientists caught one of these new “tweezer-beaked hopping rats” when they set traps with a regularly employed bait: peanut butter. The first capture, however, happened quite by chance as the rat wasn’t interested in the peanut butter. However, it did slurp up an earthworm when the scientists offered it one as an experiment. Subsequently, when the team, led by the late Danilo Balete of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History, set traps with live, wriggling earthworms as bait, they came across the two new earthworm-loving rat species.Drawings of Rhynchomys mingan and Rhynchomys labo by Velizar Simeonovski. Images © Field Museum of Natural History.Scientists named the new species Rhynchomys mingan and Rhynchomys labo after the mountains they’re respectively found on, Mount Mingan and Mount Labo. Their genus name comes from the ancient Greek rhyncos for “snout,” due to the rats’ long pointed noses, and mys for “mouse.”The rats catch earthworms by quietly hop-stalking little trails they make among the mud and humus of the forest. Once they detect an earthworm, they quickly pounce. They then brush the dirt off and swallow the worm whole, “like a long spaghetti,” according to the scientists.“One of the things that’s striking to see was their reflexes — they’re lightning quick,” says Lawrence Heaney, a curator at the Field Museum and co-author of the study. “It later became obvious why they’re that fast. They’re trying to catch a nimble earthworm that’s partly in a hole.”The research team and porters at the beginning of the hike to Mount Labo, where one of the two new species was discovered. Heaney, Balete and Alviola are in the front, center. Image by TKTK.Island evolutionLuzon is the largest Philippine island and, at 27 million years old, one of the oldest oceanic islands in the world with never any direct dry-land connection to continental Asia. With volcanoes and mountain ranges, life in Luzon has rich resources and undisturbed geographical diversity to evolve uniquely. Today, all native animals and plants of Luzon are descendants of ancient species that colonized the island by crossing formidable water barriers. The tweezer-beaked hopping rats of the Rhynchomys genus evolved from a single ancient colonization event 7 million to 9 million years ago. They are found nowhere else on Earth.These “earthworm rats” had to adapt to the prey available: earthworms. They quietly hop trails, dig deep in the soil, work through leaf litter, or go up the trees among orchids and other epiphytes, all in search of the best sustenance available. The worms are common in Luzon’s high, wet altitudes, with a forest floor covered in fallen plant material that takes a long time to decompose.An example of the mossy forest habitat where species of Rhynchomys live in northern Luzon. Image by L.R. Heaney.Scientists find Luzon particularly fascinating because it’s a natural laboratory for studying evolution.“These interwoven processes occur everywhere, but they can be studied most readily on islands because of the effects of isolation,” Rickart says. As for the rats, they have adapted uniquely to take advantage of the rainforest’s abundance in earthworms and provide a great example of how evolution works as generations of a species are isolated in confined pockets.Scientists have described 30 new species of mammals in Luzon since 2000 and expect to find more. In that same period, just one new mammal species was discovered in all of Europe, a land mass 92 times larger than Luzon. Rickart and his team say they believe Luzon has the world’s greatest concentration of endemic mammals on the planet.“There are sky islands within the big island [of Luzon],” Heaney adds.Conservation of the rats and biodiversity in LuzonOnly 6 percent of the tropical old-growth forests that blanketed the Philippines 500 years ago survive today. The country is losing its rainforests to oil palm plantations and other agricultural interests.But the two new species are lucky; they live in high-elevation forests — wet, cold and steep — and are not currently threatened by agriculture or logging. Still, experts say geothermal energy development and mining could pose threats down the road. And it may not take much to endanger the new species.“As far as we know, the two species are geographically restricted to small areas on isolated mountains, so any broad-scale disturbance to their habitat could be a great threat,” Rickart says.The good news is that scientists have seen a steady rise in the growth of secondary forests, albeit a slow one, over the last 25 years. The earthworm rats don’t necessarily require old-growth forests but do need high-altitude habitats at elevations above 1,500 meters (about 5,000 feet).“What we see is that as the forest regenerates, the native mammals move back in,” Heaney says.Cloud field atop Mount Mingan. Cloud forests are believed to contain the maximum mammalian diversity. Image by L.R. Heaney/Field Museum of Natural History.Locals understand the importance of the forests, especially old-growth ones, against the pummeling of typhoons, according to the researchers. Without forests in higher lands, and the absorbent, mulch-carpeted mossy floors that act as intact watersheds, typhoons can cause extensive damage, including loss of life, due to erosion, landslides, mudslides and floods.“The local populations and governments want to protect the land on which they depend for water and indirect resources,” Heaney says, adding that the researchers got a lot of support from the Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources.The scientists say they hope the discovery of the tweezer-beaked hopping rats, and of all the other creatures here in recent decades, will put additional focus on conservation in Luzon. When a new species is discovered, it provides publicity and spark, Heaney says: “It often helps a lot to promote the establishment of new protected areas and national parks.” The docile earthworm-slurping rats, it turns out, may inadvertently promote conservation in their home range.Map of the Philippine archipelago, showing the locations of modern islands in green, Late Pleistocene (ice-age) islands in light blue, and deep seas in dark blue. From “The Mammals of Luzon Island: Biogeography and Natural History of a Philippine Fauna,” Johns Hopkins University Press. Image © Heaney, Balete and Rickart (2016).CITATIONS: Article published by Maria Salazar Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Habitat, Interns, New Species, Research, Wildilfe last_img read more

15 years after tsunami, Aceh reckons with an inconsistent fisheries recovery

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor When a tsunami killed tens of thousands of people in Indonesia’s Aceh province, international donors contributed billions of dollars to disaster recovery effortsToday, gaps in post-disaster recovery are still visible. A breakdown of community dynamics post-disaster limited the effectiveness of some initiatives.The example of Aceh provides lessons to be learned for future disaster recoveries under the “build back better” approach, including the importance of long-term thinking when it comes to such initiatives. BANDA ACEH, Indonesia — Aceh is one of those destinations that glimmer chimerically on the horizon, alluring with its newness, but ever receding, ever retreating in memory with the passage of time. There are picturesque cliffs to the west if you drive on the coastal highway from capital city of Banda Aceh to the town of Calang, with the pristine, azure sea swirling foam to the east. Against the backdrop of colorful jetties are small shops decorated with curtains made by dangling threads of dried fish, octopuses splayed out like kites, and even stingrays. The threads twist and sway in the salty breeze like wind charms, the more browned portions of seafood skin shimmering in the sunlight, as humming women with infants tied in slings around their chests dole out anchovies on tarp-lined wooden tables. The older children run around their fishermen fathers closer to the water, unable to recall a time of catastrophe.Nearly 15 years ago, Aceh, a province on the northwestern tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, was severely hit by a 9.1 magnitude undersea earthquake that triggered one of the world’s biggest natural disasters. Massive waves rose up to 30 meters (100 feet) the day after Christmas in 2004, just 255 kilometers (160 miles) southeast of Banda Aceh. Nearly 230,000 people were reported dead or missing across a dozen countries; Indonesia itself accounted for nearly 168,000 of them. Much of Aceh was flattened, and television crews from around the world arrived to broadcast mountains of rubble, flatlands of black mud, and white shrouds filling up mass graves. Soon after, agencies — nonprofits, foreign governments, and aid organizations — teamed up for Aceh’s resurrection with an ambitious motto to “build back better.” The tsunami had acted as a circuit breaker to a three-decade-long separatist war between the Indonesian government and the Free Aceh Movement, or GAM, and along with the peace, the recovery efforts aimed at the socioeconomic betterment of the locals.Nearly 500 agencies teamed up to raise an unparalleled amount of funding at that time that totaled up to $7.7 billion. Within a four-year period, they prioritized newer and stronger infrastructure for the province and built 140,000 homes, close to 3,700 kilometers (2,300 miles) of road — including the western coastal highway rebuilt by USAID — 1,700 schools, 1,000 government buildings, and 36 airports and seaports. The physical spine of Aceh was spectacular; however, under tight deadlines and pressure from private donors for visible results, there were no quick fixes for tackling long-term drivers of vulnerability such as livelihood and social recovery. Now, 15 years later, gaps in post-disaster recovery are still visible. Unable to sustain growth despite the infrastructure, Aceh remains extremely poverty-ridden as per recent reports, with a slow economy and high unemployment rate.Ever since the 2004 tsunami, the aspirational phrase “build back better” has found its way into several disaster recovery plans and guidelines, including the U.N.-endorsed Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. This story looks back at Aceh to see what lessons have been learned to make that goal more inclusive of livelihoods in affected areas — particularly the case of fisheries in Aceh, which provided direct employment for more than 80,000 people, or 16 percent of the total coastal population, prior to the tsunami.Boats not worth usingSharifuddin sits repairing his lobster cages in a decrepit harbor in the tsunami-affected town of Calang nearly three hours away from Banda Aceh on the highway, on a platform overlooking a pier full of boats and canoes. The air is filled with the rotting smell of garbage. Nearby, there is an abandoned fuel pump (recently constructed but unused), and an empty marketplace filled with nylon ropes and plastic. There is a concrete pier, but the fishermen loading their boats use a wooden one they built themselves, claiming that the former splashes water and floods their vessels. Just a little ahead of where most of the boats are moored, a man floats on top of a rubber tire in green, murky water, trying to catch fish.Abandoned boats provided as tsunami aid decay along a pier in Aceh. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.Two big white boats decay on the sandbank. In their prime, the vessels would have outshone any other boat along this pier. But several years later, they have been eaten away by salt and time. “Not worth using,” Sharifuddin says. The boats were donated by nonprofits as part of the assistance programs after the tsunami, but they were never used. According to Sharifuddin, they were too light and not suited for the waves and wind in Aceh. Another white-and-blue boat donated by the Japanese rests unused under casuarina trees on Lamreh beach, an hour from downtown Banda Aceh.In 2004, there were 15,576 fishing boats in Aceh, according to a study based on data from the provincial fisheries department. Then the tsunami hit and the fishing community suffered exorbitantly, both in human and material loss: nearly 10,000 fishers lost their lives and close to 70 percent of Aceh’s small-scale fleet was destroyed. By 2008, the number of boats had increased to 17,584, thanks to development assistance. But by 2011, after the aid agencies had left, the number of boats in Aceh dropped back to 15,995. Research claims that this decline was due largely to poor-quality and inappropriate boats donated by the NGOs.The aid agencies tried solving problems in an expedited time frame without adequate assessment of requirements, through a deluge of short-term recovery programs, cash grants and immediate distribution of boats and gear that would result in visible impact for the media and donors. The U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reported that the agencies did not have the technical capacity to provide the right inputs, and some of them chose to ignore scientific standards and norms in the eagerness to provide aid. Boats were made with poorly selected timber, inadequate through-hull fittings and pipework, and thin planking. The agencies did not monitor their boat-building programs sufficiently, and some commissioned builders took on more projects than they could deliver adequately, compromising the quality of the vessels.An abandoned gas pump along a pier in Aceh. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.During the construction tizzy, there was a concern of overfishing due to an excess number of boats. Eventually, as the vessels started to fail, the FAO recommended that unsafe boats not be handed over to beneficiaries but be modified or even broken up.Michael Boyland, a researcher at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), found similar cases in the city of Tacloban in the Philippines that was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. The city government also claimed to use “build back better” as one of the central approaches to its disaster recovery program. Boats were provided that were not usable, so many people repurposed the wood for shelters and furniture. The donor markings are still visible on homemade tables in some cases. “Of course coordination in disasters of this [large] scale is not easy, but I think it is also driven by a need to be doing something helpful in the immediate aftermath, and there is not always time to sufficiently plan and consult everybody before acting — especially when there are lives at stake,” Boyland says. He suggests disaster preparation before the event to map out tentative allocation of resources across the spectrum of immediate response and recovery interventions as much as possible.Impact on traditional fishing platformsBack in Aceh, Zulfikar, a 43-year-old fisherman, drives his worn-out red boat from his fish ponds to a brightly colored contraption in the waters several kilometers off the coast of his village, Lhok Seudu, which is along the west coast of Aceh, 35 kilometers from Banda Aceh’s city center. Anchored atop two boats is a platform that he and eight or nine other fishermen use during the eastern monsoons, attracting fish at night using lamps. When dawn breaks, they return to the waterfront in their boats to sell their catch.This traditional fishing vessel is known as a palong. When the tsunami hit Aceh, it also devastated several palongs along its coastline. Fishermen could not afford to rebuild the destroyed communal platforms, so the agencies stepped in. John McCarthy, a development specialist at the Australian National University, surveyed some of the new palongs eight years after the disaster and found only a few of them to be working, depending one major factor: how long after the tsunami the palongs were rebuilt.The Singapore Red Cross sponsored local builders to construct five palongs in the surveyed villages. By 2012, four of them were still operating. The nonprofit had initiated the project after enough time had passed since the tsunami and the local fishers felt comfortable returning to the sea. The main fishing village oversaw the platforms’ operation, with each hamlet head supervising an individual palong. There was enough time and space given for the community to self-organize and distribute benefits and responsibilities. The palong heads learned to repair the platforms and to protect the asset as private owners.Zulfikar, a fisherman, shows the palong he works on during the eastern monsoons. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Mongabay.In contrast, the Asian Development Bank funded the construction of six palongs. By 2012, none of the platforms were in operation. Commissions by Oxfam and USAID in neighboring villages faced similar fates. As per McCarthy’s study, each of the unsuccessful projects had been initiated immediately after the tsunami, when the villagers were not psychologically motivated to go back to the sea and were dependent directly on emergency relief. The projects were also handed to fishing cooperatives or user groups set up by the agencies outside accepted local authority structures. In each case, the villagers had either failed to maintain the palong or had experienced internal conflicts within the cooperatives, or the cooperative had fallen into debt. Processes were not set up in detail for these community groups, and a lack of ownership and accountability resulted in a plethora of financial problems that led to some of the palongs being abandoned or sold.Including indigenous community networksThe deficiencies in group management arose from the breakdown of community dynamics post-disaster. The old, indigenous enforcement institution for fisheries in Acehnese communities is known as panglima laot, which roughly translates to “sea commander.” This system has date back up to 400 years, to the time when Aceh was a sultanate. The name also doubles up for the leader of the fishing community, the most learned and experienced individual in fishing practices, who ensures that the rules of the sea, or hukom adat laot, are followed — for instance, no trawlers and explosives are allowed for fishing to prevent environmental degradation. One of the tragedies of the tsunami was the death of 59 of 193 of these customary leaders in different pockets, and with them the loss of local knowledge and an interconnected functional community. The coastal members who survived the tsunami almost immediately elected their new panglima laot, but in many cases, the new leaders were often either very young and inexperienced, or elderly and unprepared to take on the responsibility. Many who were not full-time fishing skippers got elected. The fishery projects that were evaluated to be successful by researchers in the post-disaster recovery process engaged in strengthening of these social structures.Baharuddin, one of the surviving Panglima Laot leaders, oversees daily fishing activities in Lam Teungoh village. Image by Indrajeet Rajkhowa for Monagbay.However, research done by Boyland and his colleagues from SEI in 2015 revealed that many of the local fishing communities led by their panglima laot did not embrace the ambitious aim of “building back better” within the mandated recovery time frame. Instead, they wanted to return to their pre-tsunami livelihoods.One example of this is Baharuddin, one of the surviving chiefs in Lam Teungoh village, who had vehemently opposed the government’s proposal of a coastal buffer that prohibited permanent construction of new buildings within a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) radius of low-lying coastal areas. Fishermen like him must live by the sea, he explains, despite the fact that he lost almost every member of his family in the tsunami — his father, mother, brother, sister, wife, teenage son and four daughters, including a 1-month-old infant. “I said to the government, before you ask me [to relocate], you ask the people who live close to the sea in Jakarta,” he laughs. The people who live by the ocean in Indonesia’s capital are as dependent on it for livelihood as his community is in Aceh. Widespread resistance to the coastal buffer finally led to the government rescinding its prohibition in mid-2005.Boyland attributes this to the failed pantomime between the aid agencies and the people: “Fairly soon after the disaster, the United Nations, represented by Bill Clinton and the NGOs were pushing for a ‘build back better’ approach — saying ‘let’s use this as an opportunity to make these places better than they were before.’ But was ‘build-back better’ well-defined and commonly understood beyond principles? Were the people of Aceh consulted on this? Was the historical context of Aceh fully understood by outside actors? Arguably, not nearly enough in all cases.”According to Boyland, the balance lies in keeping livelihood central to different aspects of post-disaster recovery such as housing reconstruction, relocation, community participation, and infrastructure. Livelihood is primarily thought of in terms of income, he says, but is in fact a more durable solution that encompasses human, financial, natural, physical and social needs.Multidimensional recoveryThe overall story of fisheries in Aceh is one of inconsistent progress, and 15 years later, this has contributed to Aceh’s economic slump, even with the new infrastructure. There is corroding poverty and high unemployment. However, certain slip-ups were inevitable given the scale of destruction. Aceh remains a sufficiently well-documented model in post-disaster recovery practices due to the volume of unprecedented multi-donor funding that was pumped into a developing nation, and the urgency that came with it.But Aceh’s current situation cannot be attributed solely to shortcomings in post-disaster recovery 15 years ago. Its plight is due heavily to a plethora of local vectors such as political power dynamics after decades of conflict in a semi-autonomous province, improper resource utilization, and lack of official accountability. As local activist and former World Bank consultant Muslahuddin Daud likes to put it, “Aceh is ready to fight, but not to grow.” But what merits special thought for better positive outcomes, according to him, is the need for sufficient investment of time for aid; one that divides funding into phases for emergency response, and then reconstruction and long-term recovery efforts. This is a lesson that has been picked up by the city of Tacloban, at least in theory: according to the central planning document, goals were divided into early recovery projects (shelter, livelihood, infrastructure restoration) to be completed within three years, and longer-term developmental projects to be implemented between three and nine years after Haiyan.The world has moved on to other calamities since Aceh, but the province still harbors lessons for the future behind its veil of freshly paved roads and new buildings. Ask the people living around the fishing boat resting on the first floor of a house inland in Banda Aceh. The traces of struggle amid the resilience are not hard to find.Banner: Khairullah, a fisherman, leans against an abandoned boat donated by Japan on Lamreh beach in Aceh.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Community Development, Disasters, Environment, Featured, Fishing, Foreign Aid, Governance, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Oceans last_img read more

Nature-based climate action no longer ‘the forgotten solution’

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki At the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) held in San Francisco last year, nature-based solutions to the climate crisis — like keeping forests standing and restoring degraded ecosystems to enhance their carbon storage potential — were referred to as “the forgotten solution.”Though conservation of forests and other landscapes could be playing a crucial role in mitigating global climate change, renowned conservationist and UN messenger for peace Dr. Jane Goodall, in a speech delivered last September at the GCAS, said she had personally attended a number of conferences where forests went unmentioned. “Saving the forest is one third of the solution,” Goodall said. “We must not let it be the forgotten solution.”That message appears to have been heeded by a number of governments, companies, and civil society groups who committed to major nature-based climate initiatives at the UN Climate Summit held last Monday and the NYC Climate Week that concludes this weekend. At the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) held in San Francisco last year, nature-based solutions to the climate crisis — like keeping forests standing and restoring degraded ecosystems to enhance their carbon storage potential — were referred to as “the forgotten solution.”Technological fixes and high-profile commitments from countries and the private sector draw most of the attention, but researchers have shown that a range of what they call “natural climate solutions” could provide more than a third of the “cost-effective climate mitigation needed between now and 2030” to keep global warming well below 2°Celsius, the goal enshrined in the 2015 Paris Agreement. These natural solutions include a range of “conservation, restoration, and improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands.”One analysis found that just by restoring logged or degraded forests and improving forest management we could remove the equivalent of the emissions from 1.5 billion cars from the atmosphere every year.Rainforest of Cocobolo Nature Reserve, Panama. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Though conservation of forests and other landscapes could be playing a crucial role in mitigating global climate change, renowned conservationist and UN messenger for peace Dr. Jane Goodall, in a speech delivered last September at the GCAS, said she had personally attended a number of conferences where forests went unmentioned.“Saving the forest is one third of the solution,” Goodall said. “We must not let it be the forgotten solution.”That message appears to have been heeded by a number of governments, companies, and civil society groups who committed to major nature-based climate initiatives at the UN Climate Summit held last Monday and the NYC Climate Week that concludes this weekend.For instance, the Central Africa Forest Initiative announced a 10-year agreement between Gabon and Norway that will see the African country receive $150 million in exchange for keeping forests intact and reducing its emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. As part of the partnership, Norway has agreed to pay twice the going rate of carbon, setting a price floor of $10 for each certified ton of emissions reductions achieved by Gabon.Ola Elvestuen, Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment, called the agreement “a major breakthrough for REDD+ in Africa,” referring to the UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. “It properly takes into account Gabon’s special status as a country with high forest cover and low deforestation. Gabon is 88% covered with forests, and I hope our partnership can help them reach their goal to maintain 98% of that for the future,” Elvestuen said.Members of the Batak tribe fishing in Palawan, the Philippines. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Gabon’s Minister of Forest, Seas, Environment and Climate Change, Lee White, said that the partnership could be a model for other countries to follow: “Norway’s agreement to double the price of a ton of rainforest carbon dioxide is highly significant and gives us hope that the international community will move towards a realistic price that will provide a real incentive for rain forest countries to follow our example.”Another initiative, an alliance jointly announced by French President Emmanuel Macron, Colombian President Ivan Duque, and Chilean President Sebastian Piñera at the UN Climate Summit on September 23, aims to protect the Amazon and other tropical forests. The alliance has already been backed by $100 million from the French government and $20 million from the NGO Conservation International. Germany, Norway, and Peru have also signaled their support.At an event in the Central Park Zoo on September 25, five environmental organizations — Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC), Rainforest Foundation Norway (RFN), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and World Resources Institute (WRI) — launched The Forests for Life Partnership, which aims to forestall the degradation of 1 billion hectares of the most intact forests worldwide. The focus of the initiative will be on the intact forests of the Amazon, the Congo Basin, New Guinea, and the northern Boreal zone, as well as smaller intact forests in places like Mesoamerica, Madagascar, and South and Southeast Asia.The founding groups have committed $50 million over the next five years to the Forests For Life Partnership, and plan to secure an additional $200 million in funding from individuals, foundations, corporations, and governments. One of the first major regional efforts supported by the partnership will be the 5 Great Forests of Mesoamerica Initiative, also launched during Climate Week.“The loss of the world’s great forests would prevent any comprehensive response to climate change, and would result in a catastrophic extinction event,” Wes Sechrest, GWC’s CEO and chief scientist, said in a statement. “This is really an opportunity for the countries with these critically important forests to demonstrate global leadership in preventing the climate crisis and stemming biodiversity loss by protecting their own natural heritage.”Helmeted Iguana, Corytophanes cristatus, in the rainforest of Cocobolo Nature Reserve, Panama. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.Institutional investors are getting in on the nature-based climate action as well. In response to the fires in the Brazilian and Bolivian Amazon, the week before the Climate Summit some 230 global investors who collectively manage $16.2 trillion in assets issued a statement putting hundreds of unnamed companies on notice that they must meet the commitments they’ve made to root deforestation out of their commodities supply chains or face economic consequences. At the UN Climate Summit, a group of international investors went a step further by launching the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance. Members of the Alliance, who together manage more than $2.4 trillion in investments, committed to making their investment portfolios carbon-neutral by 2050.If these statements and alliances were warning shots from investors, at least some producers of agricultural commodities appear to have received the message. Together with 19 “agriculture-centric companies” like Danone, Nestlé, and Unilever, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development launched a new initiative “to develop innovative solutions aimed at protecting and enhancing biodiversity” in commodities supply chains.“The global food and agricultural ecosystem is critically dependent on biodiversity: from soil regeneration through to water filtration, pest control and pollination, among many of the other building blocks of life on earth,” Emmanuel Faber, Chairman and CEO of Danone, said while announcing the One Planet Business for Biodiversity initiative on stage at the Climate Summit. “According to many recent scientific studies, we have ten years to reset our course and bend the curve on climate change and wild and cultivated biodiversity loss.”These are just a few of the coalitions and partnerships announced in the past week that put preserving and restoring nature at the center of climate action. Many countries are making nature-based commitments within their own borders, as well.New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said at the Climate Summit that her country is “determined to show that New Zealand can and will be the most sustainable food producer in the world.” Over the next five years, Ardern said, her government “will collaborate to build systems that every farmer will be able to use to measure, manage and reduce their own farm’s emissions.”A river wends it way toward the Caribbean sea, Guatemala. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.New Zealand has also pledged to plant a billion trees by 2028, with 150 million of those already in the ground. Ethiopia has pledged to plant 4 billion trees a year. Nigeria says it will employ youth to plant 25 million trees. Pakistan committed to planting 10 billion new trees over the next five years. Sierra Leone committed to planting 100 million trees by 2023. Kenya aims to plant 2 billion trees by 2022, and restore 5.1 million hectares (12.6 million acres) of forest. Guatemala intends to restore 1.5 million hectares (3.7 million acres) of forest by 2022. Colombia plans to restore 300,000 hectares (741,000 acre) of forest by 2022 and place 900,000 hectares (2.2 million acres) of land under agroforestry or sustainable forest management.In discussing why he was convening the Climate Summit, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said, “We need to cut greenhouse emissions by 45% by 2030. We need carbon neutrality by 2050. … That is why I am telling leaders don’t come to the Summit with beautiful speeches. Come with concrete plans — clear steps to enhance nationally determined contributions by 2020 — and strategies for carbon neutrality by 2050.”Whether or not countries have truly risen to Guterres’ call for more ambitious climate action remains to be seen. When they signed the Paris Agreement in 2015, countries agreed to ratchet up their ambition every 5 years, meaning they must submit new Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), nation-specific climate action plans, at next year’s UN Climate Change Conference.“The measurable outcomes of the Summit will be in next year’s NDCs,” Caleb McCLennen, Vice President for Global Conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Society, told Mongabay.But one thing that is clear is that nature-based climate solutions are finally going mainstream.“In California, nature-based solutions were branded the forgotten solution,” McClennen said. “Now they’re being implemented by commitments. It feels like it shifted from exposing the issue to, this year, political leaders and projects on the ground really making it happen.”Wallace’s Flying Frog, Rhacaphorus nigropalmatus, in the Borneo Highlands of Sarawak. Photo Credit: Robin Moore, Global Wildlife Conservation.CITATION• Griscom, B. W., Adams, J., Ellis, P. W., Houghton, R. A., Lomax, G., Miteva, D. A., … & Woodbury, P. (2017). Natural climate solutions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(44), 11645-11650. doi:10.1073/pnas.1710465114Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Climate Science, Deforestation, Environment, forest degradation, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Mitigation, Redd last_img read more

Biodiversity ‘not just an environmental issue’: Q&A with IPBES ex-chair Robert Watson

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate Change, Conservation, Conservation Finance, Coral Reefs, Deforestation, Ecosystem Finance, Ecosystem Services, Ecosystem Services Payments, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Finance, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Illegal Logging, Interviews, Logging, Oceans, Payments For Ecosystem Services, Plants, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, United Nations, Water, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, World Bank center_img The World Bank and IMF meetings from Oct. 14-20 will include discussions on protecting biodiversity and the importance of investing in nature.A recent U.N. report found that more than 1 million species of plants and animals face extinction.In a conversation with Mongabay, Robert Watson, who chaired the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services that produced the report, discusses the economic value of biodiversity. The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund are holding their annual meetings this week, Oct. 14-20, in Washington, D.C. Amid the discussions around jobs, poverty reduction and value chains, one of the talks will center on a seemingly unusual topic for the bankers, economists and finance ministers in attendance: biodiversity.Myriad species of plants, animals and other forms of life support valuable services on which people and economies rely, ranging from medicines and food to clean air and water. But according to a recent report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, or IPBES, the threat of extinction looms for as many as 1 million species of plants and animals.That makes now the time to invest in protecting this “natural capital,” says Robert Watson, an environmental scientist who until recently helmed the IPBES. Not only will stemming the loss of global biodiversity benefit the world’s poor who depend on these services for daily survival — a significant ethical issue, to be sure, Watson pointed out. But bolstering protections for the wide range of life on Earth is also critical to the global economy, as well as its ability to ride out the future shocks that a changing world may bring.“Protecting biodiversity is more than an environmental issue,” he said. “It is a development and economic issue.”Mongabay spoke with Watson ahead of his Oct. 17 talk at the World Bank-IMF meetings.Robert Watson, former chair of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Image by Diego Noguera/IISD.Mongabay: Your presence this week seems to signify that there’s a shift, that bankers and finance ministers are paying attention to the global biodiversity crisis. Would you agree with that?Robert Watson: Yes, without any question. I was in New York a couple of weeks ago at the [United Nations climate meeting]. During that week, the World Economic Forum got together what they call [the Nature Champions], and they committed to writing a really good report about both financing and evolution of the economic system to make sure that we can conserve, protect, [and restore] biodiversity. So there seems to be a very strong interest in both the finance sector and the business community at large.A Galapagos tortoise. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Why do you think that is, and why now?While climate change has been the big environmental issue that everyone’s looked at, over the last few years, the finance sector, the business community, as well as governments, of course, have an ever-increasing interest in biodiversity. And I think the [IPBES] global assessment, which we produced in May, got incredible coverage all around the world. There are many businesses that depend on biodiversity, depend on nature. Obviously, the agricultural sector, that’s a no-brainer. But also, power plants [and] aluminum smelting plants require water. Many, many businesses rely on nature.Secondly, many businesses have a footprint on nature. I think that as the world is recognizing we need to be more sustainable, many businesses realize that they need to limit and minimize their footprint. That then brings, of course, the finance sector, who should be asking themselves, when they make a loan, will a change in climate or a loss of biodiversity, undermine the loan? And secondly, effectively, I think there is now a real demand for sustainability. And therefore, there’s an incentive to find sustainable projects in biodiversity, sustainable fisheries, sustainable agriculture, sustainable forests, et cetera. At the end of the day, it makes good business sense.A yellow anemone in Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The big headline from the IPBES report was the million species facing extinction. Those are stark terms. But one thing that was less emphasized in the media was the decrease in the diversity of crops and livestock species that we rely on. How dependent are we on biodiversity?One of the things that’s happened is agriculturalists across the world are more and more focused on a small number of genetic species with high yields. Yet, in the long term, especially with things such as climate change, we need to be absolutely sure that we have a wide range of genetic variability of different plants and animals in case they have to adapt to change in environmental conditions. Luckily, many of the newspaper stories also did cover that we are really transforming our forests, our mangrove swamps, our grasslands, et cetera. And I think the key issue is that biodiversity is not just an environmental issue. It’s fundamentally an economic issue. It’s got both market and non-market economic value. There are many of these ecosystem services like controlling the climate, controlling pollution, controlling floods [and] purifying water which don’t have a direct value in the marketplace, but have huge non-market value as well as a lot of social value.If we lose biodiversity, and of course, if we change the climate, they both affect food security, water security [and] human health. Unfortunately, when you lose biodiversity, it tends to be poor people in poor countries who depend on biodiversity. There are examples around the world where a lack of resources or a loss of natural resources has led to tension, conflict [and] migration. It’s obviously an ethical issue that, one, we shouldn’t destroy biodiversity. Two, it’s ethical because typically, it’s the rich people in the world who have caused the problem. Poor people suffer, and it’s future generations that will suffer even more.I think governments — I’ve heard many ministers say this — realize now that climate change and biodiversity are interrelated issues. And they’re far more than environmental issues. I think the recognition they have economic implications, development [and security] implications, has raised it up. From a private sector standpoint, more and more of the public, at least middle class who can afford it, are demanding more sustainable goods. And therefore there is a market for those that can afford it for more sustainably produced goods. So it makes sense for both a government perspective and a private sector perspective.A leaf-mimicking treehopper in Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Can you give us a sense of what your key messages of your talk will be?I’m going to point out that biodiversity is under threat due to human activity. The first [driver] is land use change. The second one is exploitation. In the oceans, it’s overexploitation of fisheries. And the third one at the moment is climate, followed by pollution and invasive alien species. But I will also say climate change is likely to be as or more important than the other drivers in the coming decades. Hence, we’ve got look at both of these things together basically.So I’ll talk about, what are the drivers for change? I point out that, by not dealing with that biodiversity loss, we will be undermining many of the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals between climate change and biodiversity. They threaten food security [and] water security. There are gender issues. There are security issues. If you want to meet the Sustainable Development Goals, we do need to address both climate change and the loss of biodiversity.I’ll point out then that to deal with biodiversity, we need more inclusive governance structures. We need governments to work with the private sector, work with the NGO civil society. We need multi-sector planning. One can’t just think of an agricultural policy. One has to say, if I’m going to do something on agriculture, what are the effects on biodiversity? Or what are the effects on water? If you’ve got an energy policy or technology, what are the implications for biodiversity? We can’t do one sector at a time. And we need to evolve the economic system. We need to get rid of the perverse energy, transportation and agricultural subsidies [amounting to] over a trillion dollars a year. We need to eliminate those because most of them adversely affect biodiversity and stimulate climate change.Secondly, we need to bring the value of nature into national accounts. Three, we should embrace things like the circular economy. And we need to provide short-term incentives for sustainable production.It’s not saying we should be getting rid of capitalism, definitely not. It’s not saying we should get rid of using GDP as a measure of economic growth. But we need to complement GDP. While it’s a measure of economic growth, it is not a measure of sustainable economic growth. Obviously the time for action is not only now. It was 20, 30 years ago, but we need to act basicallyBaobabs at sunset in Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.I understand you’re part of the Dasgupta Review in the U.K.Yeah, [Partha Dasgupta] was asked by the chancellor of the exchequer to do a review to evaluate the value of biodiversity. What he will try and show is that for an individual country, you should be looking at what are your ecosystems, your biomes, and what do they contribute in natural capital? What do they contribute to the market? What do they contribute in non-market value?Some social scientists don’t like this. They say that commoditizes nature. I personally disagree with that. I think it’s very important to show these ecosystems do have economic value, even if it’s not all in the marketplace, because that allows the environment minister to talk to the agricultural minister, the energy minister, the treasury minister. Protecting biodiversity is more than an environmental issue. It is a development and economic issue.The temperate Hoh rainforest in the U.S. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.It seems like it’s difficult to do this at a global scale. Would you say that it would be advisable for countries like the U.S. or other major players on the world economic stage to do these assessments for themselves?I would argue that, to the degree it can be done, all countries should try as much as possible. I heard quite often as we did the [IPBES] global assessment that Africa recognizes that one of the most important things they’ve got for potential economic growth is their natural capital. They’ve got a wealth of forest, wetlands, et cetera.The question is, how could you — I’ll use the IPBES term — “sustainably” use them? How could you use or exploit these systems without destroying them? In other words, how do you sustainably use a forest or a wetland or coral reef or mangrove system? So I will argue that it’s probably as or more important for poorer countries to do this evaluation because natural capital could be a larger part of their economy than a rich country like the U.S. So I don’t think it’s just an issue of rich countries doing these sort of evaluations. The challenge, however, is fairly simple. Do we have the data to do good analyses? Countries like the U.K., many in Europe [and] the U.S. have probably a much better understanding of their ecosystems, than a number of developing countries.Orbicular batfish in Komodo, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.We’re I think less than a year away from the Convention on Biological Diversity meeting in China next year. Do you expect the value biodiversity to be a larger topic there?I would hope it would be part of the conversation. I think the meeting in China next year is very, very important. Governments met in Japan in 2010 and came up with a 20 Aichi Targets, [which are] a wide range of targets and goals to protect biodiversity [and] to raise awareness of biodiversity. One of them talks about incorporating natural capital into international accounts. To be quite honest, as we said in IPBES global assessment, we’ve made some progress on some of them, but almost none of the targets will be met, unfortunately.In my opinion, some of those are really good targets, and they could expand out for later 2025, 2035. I won’t be part of that dialogue, but I would hope that governments would talk about the economic values, the social values, the development values of why we do need to protect biodiversity, why we need to restore some of the degraded land. I would hope at that meeting, and at the Convention on Climate Change only a month later, they will also talk about how they need to think about climate change and biodiversity together, because these two issues are almost inseparable. Climate change affects biodiversity. Loss of biodiversity affects climate change.Also, when one tries to think about solutions of how to mitigate climate change, people talk about nature-based solutions, such as using bioenergy, that bioenergy could potentially be good, but it could also under certain circumstances actually lead to a loss of biodiversity. And it can also threaten food security. So one has to look at the synergies and trade-offs of some of these response options for climate change and biodiversity. So, I would hope both of the big conventions would recognize the interrelationship between the two issues and that they need to think about them together.Banner image of a blueberry grasshawk in Indonesia by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: This interview was edited for clarity and length.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Illegal logging persists in Cambodia’s Prey Lang Wildlife Sanctuary: Report

first_imgActivism, Conservation, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Peoples, Law Enforcement, Logging, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Cambodia’s Prey Lang forest was declared a wildlife sanctuary in 2016, but illegal land clearing within the protected area continues, a new report has found.Members of the Cambodian Youth Network (CYN), who recently patrolled 1,761 hectares (4,352 acres) of forest in Prey Lang Wildlife Sanctuary, found that several hundred hectares of dense, evergreen forest had been cleared, and hundreds of trees had been marked for logging in the near future.CYN worries that if the clearing continues, the government could grant economic land concessions on those lands in the future.CYN has called on the Cambodian government to crack down on the illegal encroachment and stop any more forest from being cleared. Prey Lang Wildlife Sanctuary in Cambodia continues to be illegally cleared, according to a new report by the Cambodian Youth Network (CYN).Located in the central plains of Cambodia, Prey Lang forest straddles the four provinces of Kratie, Stung Treng, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear. In 2016, to halt the rampant illegal logging that had been degrading the forest at an alarming rate, an area of nearly 4,320 square kilometers (1,668 square miles) of the forest was declared a wildlife sanctuary. But despite the protected area status, illegal clearing has continued unabated, local conservation groups have found.Earlier this year, for example, a report by the Prey Lang Community Network (PLCN), a group of volunteers from communities living in and around Prey Lang, found that the protected area lost 56 square kilometers (22 square miles) of forest in 2017 alone.Now, the latest report from CYN has documented further evidence of more recent illegal logging and land encroachment.Between July and August this year, CYN and PLCN investigated instances of illegal forest clearing in the northern part of the sanctuary. They patrolled 1,761 hectares (17.6 square kilometers, or 6.8 square miles) of the forest in Stung Treng and Preah Vihear provinces, and found that several hundred hectares of dense, evergreen forest had been cleared.“It wasn’t usually the single trees being cut down but large areas had been cleared,” CYN vice president Sar Mory told Mongabay. “In some areas at least five to six hectares of forest have been cleared, while in others almost 100 hectares [1 square kilometer; 0.4 square miles] have been cleared. But we did find single trees being cut down as well, including trees like rosewood and trees used for construction purposes.”Forest cleared in Prey Lang. Image courtesy of the Cambodian Youth Network.Map of the investigated area. Image courtesy of Cambodian Youth Network.The patrol teams also found evidence of illegal logging that was to come. Smaller trees and undergrowth had been cleared in some places, which Mory said would make it easier for the loggers to cut bigger trees using chainsaws in the future. Hundreds of single trees had also been marked with red paint, suggesting they had been targeted for felling. Moreover, several trees had been logged in lines, some extending 200 to 500 meters (660 to 1,640 feet). The way in which the trees have been marked and lines cleared indicates that the loggers plan on subdividing the land into lots, Mory added.CYN suspects that this is being done to make way for agro-industrial farming, to grow crops like cassava and cashew. While the investigation team couldn’t identify the people behind the land encroachment, it was able to identify some middlemen who had hired people from surrounding villages to cut down the trees.“It’s mostly people from Kampong Cham and Thbong Khmom [also spelled Tbong Khmum] provinces who clear the forest inside the sanctuary — they have money and they hire people who are poor to clear the forest land for them,” Mory said.Trees marked for future logging. Image courtesy of the Cambodian Youth Network.Forest clearing and land encroachment within Prey Lang is illegal. Still, Mory worries that if the clearing continues, the government could grant economic land concessions on those lands in the future.“If there’s no effective crackdown on illegal encroachment then we will [see] huge areas of cleared forest,” Mory said.The protected area isn’t being “protected” effectively, he added: “Frankly, since Prey Lang became a sanctuary we haven’t seen much change especially in terms of effectiveness of protection and conservation of the forest. Illegal logging still continues. Land encroachment still exists.”CYN, which has shared its report and findings with the environment ministry, hopes to see immediate action.“We want to see the ministry of environment take urgent investigation and effective intervention to crackdown and stop the logging and not allow any more clearing for farming purpose,” Mory said. “We can restore the forestland that has been cleared or burnt. If that land is occupied or granted economic concession, we’ll have no way to restore the forest cover.”Trees illegally cut inside Prey Lang. Image courtesy of the Cambodian Youth Network.Banner image of cleared forest in Cambodia’s Prey Lang Wildlife Sanctuary courtesy of the Cambodian Youth Network.last_img read more

In Indonesia’s provinces, ditching coal for renewables would cut carbon and costs: study

first_imgClimate Change, Coal, Conservation, Energy, Environment, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Renewable Energy Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Contrary to often-used arguments that fossil fuels are cheaper than renewable energy in Indonesia, a recent analysis found that shifting to renewables could actually cut both emissions and costs.The analysis, part of a joint Indonesian-Danish energy program, was conducted in four Indonesian provinces. It found that if those provinces fully developed their potential renewable energy sources, they could save up to 11.5 million tons of CO2 by 2030 and nearly 40 trillion rupiah (US$2.8 billion) each year.Each of the four provinces — North Sulawesi, Gorontalo, South Kalimantan and Riau — has significant potential for renewable energy generation, but local governments currently plan to rely on fossil fuels like coal to meet long-term energy demand. In Indonesia, a major producer and consumer of coal, politicians often argue that continued reliance on the highly polluting fossil fuel remains an economic necessity.Challenging this conventional wisdom, a recent analysis of four Indonesian provinces concluded that shifting from fossil fuels to renewable energy would not only reduce carbon emissions, but also prove more cost-effective than current government plans.The study, part of a joint Danish-Indonesian program aimed at increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy in Indonesia, focused on four provinces: North Sulawesi, Gorontalo, South Kalimantan and Riau. Analysts found that if these provinces fully developed their renewable energy resources, they could reduce emissions by up to 11.5 million tons CO2 by 2030 while saving nearly 40 trillion rupiah (US$2.8 billion) each year.Each of the four provinces studied was found to have significant, but largely untapped, potential for renewable energy.South Kalimantan, for instance, expects energy demand to double in the next 10 years. Plans currently call for that demand to be met largely through coal and natural gas, with renewable energy accounting for only 14% of the energy mix by 2025.By 2050, the share of renewables in South Kalimantan’s power mix is expected to decline to just 9%.With South Kalimantan sitting on top of one of Indonesia’s largest coal reserves, it’s likely that the fuel will continue to dominate the province’s energy mix, says Alberto Dalla Riva, an energy analyst at the Danish Energy Agency.A coal mining operation near the Bukit Tigapuluh National National Conservation area in Riau, Indonesia. Photo by Kemal Jufri/GreenpeaceHowever, the analysis concluded that by developing large-scale solar and wind power, renewable energy could meet 24% of the province’s energy demand by 2050. The study also recommended switching from coal to natural gas to meet the balance of the province’s power needs.By making this transition, South Kalimantan could save 3.3 trillion rupiah ($237 million) per year, while reducing carbon emissions by 60% in 2050. The amount of money saved was found to be even greater, up to 5.7 trillion rupiah ($409 million), if health care and other costs related to pollution were taken into account.South Kalimantan wasn’t the only province projected to benefit from switching to renewables. Riau province, on Sumatra island, could also gain by tapping into the province’s potential for solar, biomass and biogas energy.By increasing the share of renewable energy from the planned 47% to 60% in 2050, the province could save 18 trillion rupiah ($1.3 billion), the study found.Meanwhile, North Sulawesi has significant potential for solar, hydro and geothermal energy. Gorontalo, also on Sulawesi island, holds promise for solar energy.“North Sulawesi and Gorontalo can use the opportunity created by the decline in solar energy costs,” Dalla Riva said.Dalla Riva said that by 2030, solar energy could provide up to 11% and 21% of electricity in North Sulawesi and Gorontalo, respectively.Overall, renewable energy could generate 85% of electricity in both provinces by 2030, and doing so would save 12.6 trillion rupiah ($903 million) compared to business as usual. If pollution-related health costs are taken into account, the amount of money saved would reach 17.4 trillion rupiah ($1.2 billion).A worker walking by rows of solar panels at the Kayubihi Power Plant in Bangli, Bali, Indonesia. The Kayubihi Power Plant is the only solar-powered plant operating in Bali out of a total of three plants. Image by Anton Muhajir/Mongabay Indonesia.Not so easyResponding to the study, local officials in the four provinces said that developing renewable energy sources remains dependent on investment flowing into the sector.Rudi, a representative of the Riau office of the state-owned electricity firm, PLN, said developing solar energy in the province is expensive. However, he said PLN is aware of the need to develop alternate energy sources and might review the province’s energy plan to increase the share of renewables.“If there are investments, we are open to it [developing solar power],” Rudi said.In addition to the lack of investment, other issues have also hindered the development of renewable energy sources.In North Sumatra, the Lahendong geothermal power plant has faced protests from area residents who demand the project developer recruit only local people for employment. In North Sulawesi’s Bolaang Mongondow district, there are at least eight spots that have geothermal potential, but they overlap with protected forest areas and mining concessions.Despite these obstacles, Sugeng Mujiyanto, the head of the energy policy facilitation department at the National Energy Council, said provinces could still work to develop renewables to their full potential even if they have already submitted their energy plans to the central government.“What’s important is to be optimistic in implementing [the plans],” he said.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Dec. 2, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: study

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer Scientists predominantly believe that the tropics have the largest influence on global weather, but new research suggests that climate change-driven Arctic heating and rapid melting of Arctic sea ice could impact places as far away as the equator.A new study, published today, found that accelerating ice melt in recent decades could be linked to Central Pacific trade wind intensification, the emergence of El Niño events, and a weakening of the North Pacific Aleutian Low Circulation — a semi-permanent low pressure system that drives post-tropical cyclones and generates strong storms.A 2019 study likewise revealed a close connection between winter Arctic ice concentration over the Greenland-Barents Seas and the El-Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the following winter. Another study out this month found that in prehistoric times, periods of major permafrost thawing were tied to an absence of Arctic summer sea ice.Other research has drawn connections between rising Arctic temperatures and changes in the jet stream — a fast-moving river of air that circles the northern polar region. A slowing of the jet stream, and its looping far to the south, is thought to be stalling temperate weather patterns, worsening droughts, storms and other extreme weather. A young harp seal. A recently popular slogan among polar scientists asserts that: “What happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic.” A growing body of evidence is now showing that Arctic heat and sea ice melt may be influencing both temperate and tropical weather patterns. Image by Guy Lafortune CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.Melting Arctic sea ice has fundamentally and profoundly altered polar ecosystems in recent decades, creating warmer temperatures on land and disrupting the behavior of marine mammals and ice-obligate species. But now new research suggests that melting sea ice is also influencing weather systems as far away as the equatorial Pacific Ocean.Patterns originating in those tropical waters include El Niño and La Niña, which shape the weather experienced on every continent, meaning, if the new study is correct, that Arctic ice loss could have global ramifications.At the end of summer 2019, Arctic sea ice extent was tied with 2007 and 2016 as the second lowest since satellite records began in 1979. Compared to the 1981-2010 average, ice extent has declined by a third, and volume has also dropped precipitously. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds this accelerating sea ice melt could be linked to the intensification of Central Pacific trade winds, the emergence of El Niño events, and a weakening of the North Pacific Aleutian Low Circulation — a semi-permanent low pressure system that drives post-tropical cyclones and generates strong storms.Using computer analysis of historical sea ice data, two researchers at the University of California, San Diego identified which atmospheric phenomena seemed to be changing alongside the retreat of Arctic ice. Notably, they found that as the ice vanished, Central Pacific trade winds intensified.The scientists hypothesize that the melting ice triggers a series of events that shoot cold air toward the equator via the upper atmosphere: In the absence of sea ice, the warming ocean creates a rising column of air that travels vertically to the boundary of the troposphere and stratosphere, where it is then pushes south, flowing through the mid-latitudes and on to the equator.“It’s like applying a candle to the bottom of the atmosphere; you set off convection that rises to high altitudes and once it gets up there it has no place to go, so it gradually moves southward,” explains Charles Kennel, one of the study authors and former director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.Blue-footed boobies off the Galapagos Islands. If new research identifying a potential influence between Arctic sea ice melt and tropical weather is confirmed by future studies, then Arctic / tropical climate change connections could have extraordinary implications for tropical habitat, wildlife and vegetation. Image by Anthony C on flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.The effect was witnessed most strongly in models comparing a high ice-loss region north of the Siberian Arctic coast and the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Pacific where the trade winds of the Northern and Southern hemispheres join. This is one of the first studies to find evidence that melting Arctic sea ice could be influencing weather systems as far south as the tropics. However, the current research, while it shows historical concurrence of Arctic and tropical changes, it does not prove causation.Whether Arctic sea ice melt affects weather systems farther south has long been the subject of contentious debate in the scientific community. In 2012, Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, USA, published a study that drew connections between changes in the Arctic and mid-latitude extreme weather. Her work “triggered off a very large movement in the [scientific] literature which people are still warring about,” says Kennel. “This has been very controversial, but the evidence is piling up on [Francis’] side.”Researchers are increasingly certain that the extreme temperature difference between the Arctic and temperate zone farther south is one of the primary factors that drives the jet stream — a fast-moving river of air that circles the polar region in the Northern Hemisphere. But as sea ice vanishes and Arctic temperatures increase, the temperature difference between these regions is getting smaller.That means there’s less force driving jet stream winds from west to east, causing the weakened air flow to start wildly deviating from its typical polar path and looping deeply into lower latitudes. Francis’ theory proposes that the loopy, lower energy jet stream is altering historical weather patterns, causing major storms and droughts to stall in place. For example, this complex jet stream effect may have intensified the record rains and flooding brought by stalled Hurricane Harvey in 2017 and Florence in 2018.When Kennel reviewed the research on possible mid-latitude influences, he thought, “Gosh, if the effect is that big and it already gets to 45 degrees latitude, how come the [atmospheric] waves that carry all of this energy don’t get to the equator? Why should it just stop there?”Francis, who served as a reviewer of the PNAS paper, notes that Kennel’s study “provides new and compelling evidence that rapid Arctic change is affecting weather patterns even into the tropics. Traditional meteorological wisdom has long considered the tropics to be the dominant player in controlling major weather patterns, but this and other new studies suggest it’s time to also look at the north.”Arctic researchers gather data in a Siberian cave. Image courtesy of University of Oxford.Another study published last year in Climate Dynamics revealed a close connection between winter Arctic ice concentration over the Greenland-Barents Seas and the El-Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the following winter.“These results present yet more evidence for human-caused climate change affecting a major source of extreme weather, along with a silver lining that by knowing how much ice is lost in summer may help predict ENSO the following winter,” says Francis.Kennel notes that prior to 1999, most El Niños formed off the coast of Peru, well below the equator. “They came at Christmas and were given the name El Niño [Little Boy, or Christ Child, in Spanish] by Peruvian fishermen because they thought the warming and change in fisheries was associated with Christmas,” says Kennel. “Now we’re finding that many more El Niños are initiated in the Central Pacific. It’s the first indication that some El Niños in the December/January period can be triggered by the arrival of Arctic air.”New research also shows that the loss of Arctic sea ice has dire implications on land, impacting the surrounding tundra which serves as one of the largest reservoirs of stored carbon on the planet. Scientists believe that for every one degree Celsius (1.8 degree Fahrenheit) rise in Earth’s average temperature, thawing permafrost may release the equivalent of four to six years’ worth of coal, oil and natural gas carbon emissions.In a Nature study published earlier this month, researchers found that in prehistoric times, periods of major permafrost thawing were tied to an absence of summer Arctic sea ice. “This discovery about the past behavior of permafrost suggests that the expected loss of Arctic sea ice in the future will accelerate [thawing] of the permafrost presently found across much of Siberia,” says Gideon Henderson, one of the study’s authors.This growing body of work adds weight to a major emerging concern related to Earth’s bioregional interconnectedness. Scientists worry that in the future, when one bioregion reaches a climate tipping point, a domino effect could occur, triggering tipping points in other faraway places. While more research is needed, scientists point to potential cascading effects that could link rapid Arctic and Antarctic ice loss, permafrost thaw, boreal forest fires, the stalling of Atlantic Ocean circulation, coral reef die-offs, and intensifying Amazon drought.Kennel stresses the newly identified link between the Arctic and the tropics merits further research. But this work points the way.Citation:Kennel, C. F., & Yulaeva, E. (2020). Influence of Arctic Sea-Ice Variability on Pacific Trade Winds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 117(4)Banner image caption: A sea turtle swims in the tropics. Its future could be influenced by melting sea ice in the faraway Arctic Ocean. Image by Anthony C found on flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.Arctic sea ice melt may be altering weather patterns originating in equatorial waters, including the emergence of El Niño which dramatically shapes weather events experienced around the world. Image courtesy of NASA.Image by T .M. Lenton et al, Climate tipping points – too risky to bet against. Nature, November 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Science, data, Earth Science, El Nino, Global Warming, Hurricanes, Impact Of Climate Change, Monitoring, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, satellite data, Science, Sea Ice, Tropics last_img read more

2016 WIAA football playoffs, Level 2 schedule

first_imgLevel 2 games set for Oct. 28The 2016 WIAA football playoffs will continue with Level 2 games in seven divisions on Friday, Oct. 28.Winners move on to Level 3 on Nov. 4, and the Level 4 state semifinals scheduled for Nov. 11 and 12. The WIAA State Football Championships will be held at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison on Nov. 17-18.2016 WIAA Football PlayoffsLevel 2 (all games are at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, unless noted)Division 1Group ANo. 5 D.C. Everest at No. 1 Bay PortNo. 3 Hudson at No. 2 Stevens PointGroup BNo. 4 Appleton West at No. 1 KimberlyNo. 3 Milwaukee King at No. 2 Fond du LacGroup CNo. 8 Madison La Follette at No. 5 MiddletonNo. 3 Verona at No. 2 Lake Geneva BaderGroup DNo. 4 Oak Creek at No. 1 FranklinNo. 3 Racine Horlick at No. 2 Milwaukee MarquetteDivision 2Group ANo. 4 Green Bay Southwest at No. 1 MenomonieNo. 7 Holmen at No. 6 PulaskiGroup BNo. 4 Hartford at No. 1 Brookfield CentralNo. 7 Menomonee Falls at No. 3 Brookfield EastGroup CNo. 5 Monona Grove at No. 1 WaunakeeNo. 7 Watertown at No. 3 Waukesha WestGroup DNo. 4 Germantown at No. 1 Mequon HomesteadNo. 3 Greenfield at No. 2 Whitefish BayDivision 3Group ANo. 5 La Crosse Logan at No. 1 Rice LakeNo. 3 New Richmond at No. 2 OnalaskaGroup BNo. 4 Antigo at No. 1 Green Bay Notre DameNo. 3 West De Pere at No. 2 Luxemburg-CascoGroup CNo. 4 Fort Atkinson at No. 1 MonroeNo. 7 Delavan-Darien at No. 3 PewaukeeGroup DNo. 5 Wisconsin Lutheran at No. 1 Waukesha Catholic MemorialNo. 3 Plymouth at No. 2 KewaskumDivision 4Group ANo. 4 St. Croix Central at No. 1 OsceolaNo. 3 West Salem at No. 2 Gale-Ettrick-TrempealeauGroup BNo. 5 Wrightstown at No. 1 Little ChuteNo. 3 Freedom at No. 2 BerlinGroup CNo. 4 Lodi at No. 1 River ValleyNo. 3 Lake Mills at No. 2 PlattevilleGroup DNo. 4 Kiel at No. 1 Sheboygan FallsNo. 3 University School of Milwaukee at No. 2 Two RiversDivision 5Group ANo. 4 Elk Mound at No. 1 Stanley-BoydNo. 3 Stratford at No. 2 DurandGroup BNo. 4 Spencer/Columbus Catholic at No. 1 AmherstNo. 3 Winnebago Lutheran at No. 2 Southern DoorGroup CNo. 4 Arcadia at No. 1 ClintonNo. 3 Laconia at No. 2 LancasterGroup DNo. 5 Kenosha St. Joseph at No. 1 ColumbusNo. 3 Racine St. Catherine’s at No. 2 Cedar Grove-BelgiumDivision 6Group ANo. 4 Spring Valley at No. 1 GrantsburgNo. 3 Chetek-Weyerhaeuser at No. 2 Eau Claire RegisGroup BNo. 5 Niagara/Goodman/Pembine at No. 1 ColemanNo. 3 Marathon at No. 2 AbbotsfordGroup CNo. 4 Fennimore at No. 1 DarlingtonNo. 3 Markesan at No. 2 Pecatonica/ArgyleGroup DNo. 4 Lake Country Lutheran vs. No. 1 Fond du Lac St. Mary’s Springs at North Fond du LacNo. 3 Iola-Scandinavia at No. 2 OzaukeeDivision 7Group ANo. 4 De Soto at No. 1 BangorNo. 6 Eleva-Strum at No. 2 Pepin/AlmaGroup BNo. 4 Edgar at No. 1 Wild RoseNo. 6 Owen-Withee at No. 2 LoyalGroup CNo. 4 Highland at No. 1 IthacaNo. 3 Black Hawk at No. 2 ShullsburgGroup DNo. 4 Royall at No. 1 Hilbert/StockbridgeNo. 3 Oshkosh Lourdes at No. 2 Cambria-Friesland(Courtesy marshfieldareasports.com)last_img read more