Newly described pocket shark likely glows in the dark

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Deep Sea, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, New Species, Oceans, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Researchers have described a new species of pocket shark, a small shark measuring just 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) long, that possibly glows in the dark.The shark has been named the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama mississippiensis, in recognition of the biologically rich region in which it was discovered.Only two pocket sharks have ever been caught from the ocean. The previous specimen, M. parini, was collected from the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1979.The discovery of a new pocket shark species shows there is much more to learn about the Gulf of Mexico, researchers say. In 2010, researchers surveying the eastern Gulf of Mexico to study what sperm whales eat, collected numerous animals from the ocean’s depths. While examining the collection in 2013, Mark Grace of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) discovered a small shark among the specimens, measuring just 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) in length.Now, Grace and his colleagues have identified that shark as a new-to-science species, one that possibly glows in the dark. The newly described animal is a species of pocket shark, researchers say in a new study published in Zootaxa.The pocket shark gets its names not for its small size but because of small pocket-like openings or glands found behind each of its pectoral fins. Grace and his team have named the new species the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama mississippiensis, “in recognition of the vast North American Mississippi River Basin; a biologically and geographically rich region that nurtures Gulf of Mexico fauna and unites diverse cultures,” they write in the paper. The proposed common name recognizes the “extraordinary Americas of the Western Hemisphere.”Pocket sharks are incredibly rare. Before the discovery of the American pocket shark, the only other specimen of pocket shark, archived at the Zoological Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, was collected from the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1979. The species was named M. parini after the Russian ichthyologist Nikolai Vasilevich Parin.The American pocket shark is the second species of pocket shark to be described. While the shark resembles M. parini in general shape and placement of fins and pocket glands, there are several notable differences, the researchers say. The American pocket shark has 10 fewer vertebrae than M. parini, for example, different teeth, a likely pit organ located near its lower jaw, and numerous light-producing organs or photophores covering much of the body, which possibly help the shark luminesce in the deep sea.“In the history of fisheries science, only two pocket sharks have ever been captured or reported,” Grace said in a statement. “Both are separate species, each from separate oceans. Both are exceedingly rare.”Henry Bart, a co-author of the study and director and curator of fishes at Tulane University’s Museum of Natural History, said the discovery of a new pocket shark species showed there was much more to learn about the Gulf of Mexico.“The fact that only one pocket shark has ever been reported from the Gulf of Mexico, and that it is a new species, underscores how little we know about the Gulf — especially its deeper waters — and how many additional new species from these waters await discovery,” he said in the statement.The only known specimen of the American pocket shark was discovered in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Image by Mark Doosey.Citation:Grace, M. A., Doosey, M. H., Denton, J. S., Naylor, G. J., Bart, H. L., & Maisey, J. G. (2019). A new Western North Atlantic Ocean kitefin shark (Squaliformes: Dalatiidae) from the Gulf of Mexico. Zootaxa, 4619(1), 109-120. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4619.1.4last_img read more

Rainforest destruction accelerates in Honduras UNESCO site

first_imgPowerful drug-traffickers and landless farmers continue to push cattle ranching and illegal logging operations deeper into the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in eastern Honduras.Satellite data show the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve lost more than 10 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2017, more than a third of which happened within the last three years of that time period. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate Río Plátano is experiencing another heavy round of forest loss this year, with UMD recording around 160,000 deforestation alerts in the reserve between January and August, which appears to be an uptick from the same period in 2018.Local sources claim the government participates in drug trafficking, and those involved in the drug business are allegedly the same people who are involved in illegal exploitation of the land for cattle ranching and illegal logging of mahogany and cedar.Deforestation in Río Plátano means a loss of habitat for wildlife and a loss of forest resources for indigenous communities that depend on them. But another threat is emerging: water resources are becoming increasingly scarce as forests are converted into grasslands. Powerful drug-traffickers and landless farmers continue to push cattle ranching and illegal logging operations deeper into the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in eastern Honduras.The Mosquitia region, straddling the border of Honduras with Nicaragua, comprises one of the largest contiguous rainforest regions in Latin America north of the Amazon Basin, and the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve holds some of the largest tracts of old growth rainforest remaining in the region.From 2001 to 2017, satellite data from the University of Maryland shows the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve has lost more than 10 percent of its tree cover, more than a third of which happened within the last three years. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate Río Plátano is experiencing another heavy round of forest loss this year, with UMD recording around 160,000 deforestation alerts in the reserve between January and August, which appears to be an uptick from the same period last year.Data from the University of Maryland show deforestation advancing deeper into primary forest, with around 160,000 tree cover alerts detected between January and August this year. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.A visual comparison of alerts recorded so far this year to those detected during the same period in 2018 indicate forest loss is accelerating in and around Río Plátano. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest WatchSatellite images show deforestation has expanded through the reserve’s buffer zones since 2018, entering the dense forest of the core zone. The reserve serves as an important biological corridor for species such as jaguars, giant anteaters, scarlet macaws and the endangered Baird’s tapir. Further, the reserve covers ancestral territory belonging to Miskito indigenous communities, who make up nearly half the population in the reserve, and smaller populations of Pech, Tawahkas and Garífunas.Drugs and death squadsEnvironmentalist activist Darwin Ramos Antunez, who is from the city of Catacamas, Olancho near the Río Plátano Reserve, said that narco-traffickers aligned with the government are the main parties responsible for the deforestation.“The problem is the State under which we live, a narco-government, for the past 10 years,” Ramos Antunez said. “The Mosquitia region is a zone where organized crime, drug cartels control everything with help from the government.”According to Ramos Antunez, the government participates in the drug trafficking and illegal destruction of the region’s biodiversity. He said those involved in the drug business are allegedly the same people who are involved in illegal exploitation of the land for cattle ranching and illegal logging of mahogany and cedar.“The large-scale cattle ranchers and illegal loggers are narco-trafficking landowners who set up shell companies protected by the State. They don’t have permission to exploit the forests but the State allows their operations to continue because they collaborate together,” Ramos Antunez said. “The [landowners] profit from cattle ranching and wood harvesting, but the real business is in the drugs.”A cow wanders in an area cleared of forest in Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.Olancho offers access to Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve from the south, and is a hotbed of illegal timber harvesting as the highways provide a pathway for heavy cargo trucks to carry illegally harvested timber to markets in the more densely populated regions of the country.Ramos Antunez said he was part of a once powerful activist network known as Environmental Movement of Olancho (MAO) that successfully mobilized popular resistance against illegal logging operations in Olancho and Río Plátano Reserve from 2003 to 2008. However, MAO has almost disappeared after a series of prominent activists were killed, and the group’s leader Father Jose Andres Tamayo was exiled after a coup d’état in 2009.“Since 2009, they’ve planted terror by killing so many of our leaders,” Ramos Antunez said. “Today, nobody wants to speak up because there are death squads that will not think twice about killing anyone who gets in the way… If I were still in Honduras, I wouldn’t be able to talk about this.”For his work exposing the drug cartels and illegal timber harvesters, Ramos Antunez said he received death threats and was tortured by death squads before he left the country in late 2018 with the so-called migrant caravan heading north toward the United States. Once he arrived in the U.S. to seek political asylum, he was detained by ICE and held for 8 months at the Adelanto Detention Center, run by for-profit prison contractor GEO Group.In addition, Ramos Antunez said he worked with indigenous Tawahka, Miskitos and Pech communities in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve through a collective called Los Que Callan. He said that the Tawahka, who number around 2,000, are endangered by ongoing settlement in their ancestral lands as well as the construction of a 104-megawatt dam known as “Patuca III,” which was promoted by the government.Ramos Antunez said that before leaving Honduras he had worked with the leftist political party Liberty and Refoundation. Working with Tawahka guides, he said he helped photograph tractors used for building landing strips and wood harvesting deep in the rainforest. Ramos Antunez claimed that because there were neither roads nor waterways that could accommodate such large machinery, tractors must have been flown in by military helicopter, suggesting powerful people were involved.Many areas that once looked like this have been transformed into grasslands. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.According to a source in the Honduran military who spoke to Insight Crime, President Juan Orlando Hernández’s brother and former congressman Juan Antonio “Tony” Hernández, who was arrested by U.S. authorities on drug trafficking charges in November of last year, commanded criminal economies ranging from drug to timber trafficking in Olancho and eastern Mosquitia.New York’s Southern District prosecutors have implicated President Hernández as a co-conspirator in the drug trafficking and money laundering case against his brother, according to documents reported on by Univision.In response to the allegations published in Univision, President Hernández issued a statement that said the president “categorically” denied accusations that he financed his presidential campaigns with irregular money or leveraged drug trafficking to enhance his political power. Forestry cooperatives under continued threatToward the north in the Sico and Paulaya Valley, several communities operate forestry cooperatives in the Río Plátano buffer zone. The forestry cooperatives are supposed to protect a section of the forest where the harvesting of mahogany wood is allowed. The agroforestry cooperatives use mules to transport the wood, which has a lower impact than building roads.In this part of the Mosquitia, illegal timber harvesting is reportedly less prevalent than in Olancho due to a lack of road and river access, but deforestation is still a problem due to ongoing invasion by cattle ranchers.The cattle ranchers who are taking over the land are often landless farmers from interior regions of the country, who are attracted by the opportunity to escape poverty and achieve greater economic and food security. Conservation groups say that in addition to the landless farmers, large-scale landholders encourage the migration to set up massive cattle ranching operations. The landholders can use cattle ranching to secure territory and to launder illicit drug money into the legal economy.Grass and cattle flourish in an area of the biosphere reserve where a forest once stood. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.The Honduran government promotes meat exports as a way to grow the economy. Each year, the country produces 60,000 metric tons of beef, exporting 1,500 metric tons to earn $9 million in foreign exchange dollars.In November 2018, President Juan Orlando Hernandez announced a program called “SOS Honduras” as an emergency measure to stop illegal, mafia-promoted deforestation in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve.Pedro Romelo, who has inside knowledge of the forestry cooperatives but asked for his name to be changed for safety considerations, said that since the president’s announcement there has not been any significant actions or changes in the Sico and Paulaya Valley. He says that agroforestry cooperatives continue to be overrun by cattle ranchers who cut down forests to claim pasture.“SOS Honduras was simply a media show,” Romelo said. “The grasslands grow at an accelerating rate while the forest shrinks faster and faster. There are no consequences for advancing cattle ranching into the biosphere, so they keep coming.”Mongabay reached out to the Honduras government for comment, but had not received a response by the time this article was published.Deforestation in Río Plátano means a loss of habitat for wildlife and a loss of forest resources for indigenous communities that depend on them. But another threat is emerging: With the expansion of grasslands into the biosphere, Romelo said that water resources are becoming increasingly scarce.“The only good thing about the lack of water is people are becoming more conscious about the environmental problems as time goes on,” Romelo said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Corruption, Deforestation, Drug Trade, Environment, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Banner image: Deforestation in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

DiCaprio joins $5M effort to combat Amazon fires

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler In response to rising deforestation and fires in the Amazon, on Sunday actor Leonardo DiCaprio and philanthropists Laurene Powell Jobs and Brian Sheth announced the establishment of a $5 million fund to support indigenous communities and other first responders working to protect the Amazon.The Amazon Forest Fund is the first major initiative of the Earth Alliance, which Global Wildlife Conservation, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, and the Emerson Collective formed in July.The fund’s initial grants went to five Brazilian organizations: Instituto Associacao Floresta Protegida, the Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon, Instituto Kabu, Instituto Raoni, and Instituto Socioambiental.The establishment of the fund comes amid global outcry over rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. After years of declining deforestation in the region, forest clearing spiked in July. Then last week, smoke from land-clearing fires blackened the skies above Sao Paulo, acting as a catalyst for worldwide awareness of the issue. In response to rising deforestation and fires in the Amazon, on Sunday actor Leonardo DiCaprio and philanthropists Laurene Powell Jobs and Brian Sheth announced the establishment of a $5 million fund to support indigenous communities and other first responders working to protect the Amazon.“The largest rainforest in the world is a critical piece of the global climate solution,” DiCaprio said in an Instagram post. “Without the Amazon, we cannot keep the Earth’s warming in check.”CANDEIRAS DO JAMARI, RONDÔNIA, BRAZIL: Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. (Photo: Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace)The Amazon Forest Fund is the first major initiative of the Earth Alliance, which Global Wildlife Conservation, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, and the Emerson Collective formed in July. The fund’s initial grants went to five Brazilian organizations: Instituto Associacao Floresta Protegida (Kayapo), the Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon (COIAB), Instituto Kabu (Kayapo), Instituto Raoni (Kayapo), and Instituto Socioambiental (ISA).“We are proud to support [these] local organizations combating the fires, protecting indigenous lands, and providing relief to the communities impacted,” said Earth Alliance in an Instagram post.Three of the organizations are run by the Kayapo, an indigenous group whose territories serve as a bulwark against deforestation on Brazil’s so-called “Arc of Deforestation”.NOVA BANDEIRANTES, MATO GROSSO, BRAZIL. Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Nova Bandeirantes, Mato Grosso state. (Photo: Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace)The establishment of the fund comes amid global outcry over rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. After years of declining deforestation in the region, forest clearing spiked in July. Then last week, smoke from land-clearing fires blackened the skies above Sao Paulo, one of the world’s largest metropolises, acting as a catalyst for worldwide awareness of the issue. European governments and Canada have now pledged tens of millions of dollars to support fire-fighting efforts.But addressing fires in the long-run will require more than fire-fighting, say environmentalists, who have sharply criticized the Bolsonaro administration’s roll-back of environmental regulations, amnesty for illegal deforesters, and heated rhetoric against indigenous peoples, scientists, and activists.Cumulative deforestation through July for each year from 2008 according to INPE’s DETER system. Deforestation this year is on the fastest pace since 2008.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note: August 2019 data is through August 24. Fires in Amazonia are at the highest level since 2010.“The fires that are devastating the Amazon are also destroying Brazil’s image internationally,” said Márcio Astrini, Public Policy Coordinator at Greenpeace Brazil in a statement. “Even the agribusiness sectors are already admitting that the government’s anti-environmental policies can bring economic damage. In the meantime, Bolsonaro is not announcing any concrete measures to fight deforestation.”“Taking action to end deforestation must be everyone’s goal and an obligation of those who lead the country.”Related stories:Bolsonaro expresses ‘love’ for Amazon as it burns, offers no policy shift [08/26/2019]Greenpeace releases dramatic photos of Amazon fires [08/25/2019]How many fires are burning in the Amazon? [08/25/2019]Amazon fires trigger protests worldwide [08/24/2019]Satellite images from Planet reveal devastating Amazon fires in near real-time [08/22/2019]Amazon rainforest fires leave São Paulo in the dark [08/21/2019]Disclosure: Mongabay received a grant from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation in 2017, but is not an active grantee. The Foundation has no editorial influence on what we publish. Conservation, Conservation Philosophy, Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Indigenous Peoples, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, wildfires center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Gravely injured orangutan rescued near site of controversial hydropower project

first_imgA severely injured and malnourished Tapanuli orangutan has been rescued from a plantation near the site of a controversial hydropower project in Sumatra.The animal was found to have deep, infected gashes on its head and under its arm, which rescuers say were likely inflicted by humans.The orangutan may have been fleeing forest-clearing activity near the project site, which is located in the Batang Toru forest, the only known habitat of the critically endangered Tapanuli orangutan.This is not the first instance of orangutans apparently being driven out of their habitat by the project, which environmental activists and scientists say must be put on hold to protect the rarest great ape species in the world. JAKARTA — A severely injured and malnourished orangutan has been rescued from a plantation near a Sumatra forest where a hydropower project threatens the only known habitat of this particular species of great ape.Locals spotted the male Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis), believed to be about 30 years old, inside a plantation in Aek Batang Paya village, South Tapanuli district, on the edge of the Batang Toru forest. They reported it to the local conservation department, known as the BKSDA, which then enlisted the Orangutan Information Center (OIC), a conservation NGO, to help confirm the finding.Officials from the BKSDA and OIC traveled to the site on the night of Sept. 18 and found the badly injured orangutan in the plantation the next morning.“Our medical team found injuries that are very critical because there is a gash on his head,” OIC head Panut Hadisiswoyo told Mongabay. “There is also a big stab wound under his left armpit.“Our team suspects that the wounds were caused by sharp weapons. If the injuries were a result of the orangutan fighting with other animals, then there should be scratch wounds, not stab wounds,” he said, emphasizing that the orangutan had most likely been attacked by humans.The attack appears to have occurred several days earlier, given the condition of the wounds, Panut said.“His wounds were already infested with maggots,” he said.The BKSDA and OIC officials immediately evacuated the orangutan to a quarantine center managed by the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) for medical treatment.It’s not immediately clear who could have attacked the orangutan, although it’s common for the animals to be shot at and hacked by farmers who consider them a pest.A deep gash is clearly visible above the left eye of the male Tapanuli orangutan found in a plantation in northern Sumatra, Indonesia.Wake-up callThis isn’t the first time a Tapanuli orangutan has been found outside the Batang Toru ecosystem, the only known habitat of the critically endangered species but also the site of a controversial hydroelectric power plant project.A year ago, Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry reported that preconstruction activity for the dam and power plant had driven a group of Tapanuli orangutans out of their habitat and into nearby plantations.“So it’s already proven that the project has already dealt an impact,” Wiratno, the ministry’s director general for conservation, told Mongabay at the time. “While there’s no casualty yet, it’s an indication that the project must have had an impact [on the orangutans].”Panut said this latest discovery — in a plantation just 2.5 kilometers (1.55 miles) from the hydropower project site — should serve as a wake-up call for the government to protect the ape’s habitat by designating the Batang Toru ecosystem a protected forest. The Tapanuli orangutan, described in 2017 and already teetering on the brink of extinction, lives in pockets of the 1,338-square-kilometer (516-square-mile) Batang Toru ecosystem. The habitat has been fragmented by infrastructure projects such as roads, causing the population of the orangutans to plummet by 83 percent over the course of three generations.Fewer than 800 individuals are believed to survive in a tiny tract of forest less than one-fifth the size of the metropolitan area that comprises Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta.Some of the orangutans live in areas zoned for conversion, also known as APL. These areas cover 100 to 150 square kilometers (39 to 58 square miles), or 15 percent of the Tapanuli orangutans’ habitats. They also have the highest biodiversity of the entire Batang Toru ecosystem and also the highest densities of Tapanuli orangutans, with more than 10 percent of the population residing in these APL areas.Due to this APL designation, these areas aren’t protected and thus are at risk of encroachment or being cleared for industrial purposes, including the $1.6 billion hydroelectric plant and dam. The 510-megawatt plant was announced in 2012 and will be the largest in Sumatra if completed as planned by 2022.The Indonesian government considers it a priority project under President Joko Widodo’s wider infrastructure-building push. The government argues that the plant is needed to provide electricity from renewable sources in the region and to mitigate climate change. The project’s developer, PT North Sumatera Hydro Energy (NSHE) says the plant will prevent the release of up to 1.6 million tons of CO2 every year from Indonesia’s coal-reliant grid.Panut said it was possible that the injured ape had been fleeing from forest-clearing activity around the project site.“Maybe there’s a connection with forest clearing, whether it’s because of agriculture or because of the hydropower plant,” he said.That gives added urgency to designate the area as protected, he added.“Even though the area has an APL designation, it’s still the habitat of the orangutan,” Panut said. “More and more forests are being cleared in the area because of the APL designation, when it should be a protected forest area.”In response to the discovery of the injured orangutan, PT NSHE spokesman Firman Taufick said it wasn’t unusual for the apes to wander into nearby plantations in search of foods. He added that such behavior was known even before construction of the dam began.“Based on observations by locals since decades ago, when it is fruit season, like the current durian season, orangutans always come to locals’ plantations,” he told Mongabay. “So it’s not only this time an orangutan enters a local’s plantation.”Firman added that the company condemned the injuries to the animal and would continue its conservation program to protect the orangutans.“We see that the locals of South Tapanuli have local wisdoms in protecting the environment and wildlife,” he said. “In this case, we have empowered the locals with a conservation program, including wildlife, by conducting training and by forming conservation groups based on local wisdoms. The efforts to protect wildlife in the Batang Toru ecosystem are the responsibility of all parties, not only the government and the private sector.”Rescuers check the extent of the orangutan’s injuries in preparation to evacuate the animal for medical treatment. Image courtesy of the Orangutan Information Center (OIC).Call for moratoriumEarlier this year, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for a halt to all projects that threaten the Tapanuli orangutan.“IUCN is deeply concerned about ongoing and new threats to the Critically Endangered Tapanuli orangutan in Sumatra, Indonesia,” the organization said on its website.While the IUCN didn’t specifically mention the hydropower project in its statement, it recommended that all projects affecting the apes should be halted to allow time to formulate a plan to save the Tapanuli orangutan. Such a plan, the IUCN added, should be based on an independent and objective population- and habitat-viability assessment.Primatologist Serge Wich of Liverpool John Moores University, who discussed the dam project with the IUCN before the latter issued its statement, urged PT NSHE to follow the IUCN’s recommendation.“But the company never agreed to that,” Wich, who is also the co-vice chair of the section on great apes of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group, told Mongabay. “For me, the fact that the company doesn’t want that is a clear indication that they’re not interested in mitigation. They just want to go ahead with the project and secure financing.”NSHE’s Firman said the company had fulfilled all the requirements to proceed with the project. He added the company had not engaged with the IUCN but was open to communicating with it.Clarification 9/23/2019: This article originally ran with the headline ‘Orangutan found injured in apparent escape from site of hydropower project’. It has been changed to reflect that injury during escape from the hydropower project site is just one possible explanation for the ape’s injuries.Banner image of an injured Tapanuli orangutan being rescued from a plantation in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. Image courtesy of the Orangutan Information Center (OIC).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Animal Cruelty, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Critically Endangered Species, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Species, Energy, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forests, Great Apes, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, New Species, Orangutans, Primates, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Renewable Energy, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

As the Amazon burns, Colombia’s forests decimated for cattle and coca

first_imgThe environmental corridor that connects the Amazon, the Orinoquía and the Andes mountain range is in danger as a result of the ongoing deforestation.Tinigua National Natural Park lost 16,000 hectares (39,500 acres) between 2017 and July 2019, almost all of it primary forest, while the other parks also lost significant amounts of forest.The analysis identifies the main cause of the deforestation as the conversion of forests to pastures for land grabbing and livestock ranching, by invaders taking advantage of the scant government presence in the region. The last few weeks have been critical for the Amazon in Brazil and Bolivia. Fires in August razed thousands of hectares of forest and drew the attention of the international community.Neighboring Colombia hasn’t been spared either. Although the fire season here usually occurs in January and February, there has been a surge in deforestation, especially in the country’s northwestern Amazon region. Protected areas of vital importance to indigenous communities and the Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía ecological corridor have also been affected.Deforestation has strongly impacted national parks such as Sierra de la Macarena, Tinigua, Chiribiquete and Nukak, according to the latest report from the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), an initiative of the Amazon Conservation Association (ACCA) in collaboration with the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS) in Colombia.Colombia lost nearly 200,000 hectares (almost 500,000 acres) of forest in 2018, according to the Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies (known by its Spanish acronym IDEAM). And while that figure is down 10 percent from 2017, national parks are still in danger. The municipality of La Macarena, for example, registered the greatest surge in deforestation in the whole country (an increase of 26 percent), with almost half “occurring inside Tinigua park,” says Rodrigo Botero, director of the FCDS.A map showing deforestation inside protected areas, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.Loss of primary forestThe drop in deforestation in 2018 doesn’t mask the fact that 478,000 hectares (1.18 million acres) of forest were lost in the Colombian Amazon in the three years between 2016 and 2018. Nearly three-quarters of this was primary forest.According to GLAD alerts from satellite data collated by the University of Maryland, another 60,600 hectares [150,000 acres] were lost during the first seven months of 2019. Of that, 75 percent was primary forest. The MAAP report shows that this year’s loss of forest has occurred mainly inside four protected areas in the northwest of the Colombian Amazon: Tinigua, Serranía de Chiribiquete and Sierra de la Macarena national parks, and Nukak National Natural Reserve.Burned areas and roads in the middle of the Amazon. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).Among the highlights of the study: 29,000 hectares (71,700 acres) deforested in the four protected areas from 2016 to 2018; 4,300 hectares (10,600 acres) cleared by the end of July 2019Tinigua National Park was the hardest hit: 16,000 hectares (39,500 acres) were lost between 2017 and July 2019, with a peak in 2018. Chiribiquete lost 2,600 hectares (6,400 acres) since its expansion in July 2018, 96 percent of it primary forest.A large proportion of deforestation occurs in pristine forests where the flora and fauna are usually poorly studied. According to experts, these areas can take centuries to recover, if at all.“Primary forest, in this case, is described as a mature natural tropical rainforest that has not been completely cleared or has been regenerated in recent history (30-50 years). In reality, and most cases, they are probably forests that have never been cleared. So, we are talking about super-intact forests with all its biodiversity which if lost, may never be replaced,” says Matt Finer, director of the MAAP.The question now is why this is happening in protected areas of great biological and ecological importance. After the signing of a peace agreement between guerrillas from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the government in 2016, he guerrilla groups left the Amazon. Their departure and the lack of government presence in these areas facilitated land grabbing by large landowners and other illegal armed groups.“The highest rates of deforestation in Amazonian national parks are found in ones with no presence of park officials. They have either been displaced from the area or evacuated due to threats against them,” says Botero from the FCDS.The environmental sector has weak governance, he says, which limits park monitoring by officials and their work with communities. These factors “enable deforestation in these areas,” Botero says. One of the most worrisome things for experts is seeing illegal land transactions within indigenous areas, national parks, forest reserves and community reserves.A map of deforestation hotspots in the Colombian Amazon, based on data from UMD/GLAD, RUNAP, RAISG.Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía corridor in dangerThe MAAP analysis identifies three critical deforestation areas in the northwestern Colombian Amazon: the convergence zone between Tinigua, La Macarena and Chiribiquete national parks; the western sector of the Chiribiquete park expansion zone; and the northwestern segment of Nukak National Natural Reserve.In all cases, there is a common deforestation driver. “The main cause in the region is the conversion to pastures for land grabbing and livestock,” Finer says.Colombian Amazon landscape after cleared areas have been set on fire. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).A map showing deforestation in the Tinigua, Serranía de Chiribiquete and Sierra de la Macarena national parks as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.According to the FCDS, the southern area of Tinigua National Natural Park has been persistently encroached on during the past three years. The best preserved area is located north of the Guayabero River. However, this small fragment of forest owes part of its conservation to the presence of armed groups — the FARC previously, and dissidents today. That’s why this area has not yet been colonized or destroyed.Loss of primary forest in Tinigua jumped by nearly 400 percent between 2017 and 2018, to almost 12,000 hectares (30,000 acres), according to a graph in the MAAP report. There’s been a consistent increase in forest loss in Sierra de la Macarena since 2016, and the trend seems to have caught on in Tinigua, leading to the fragmentation of the Andes-Amazon-Orinoquía corridor.“In La Macarena, the deforestation axis has [been] heavily concentrated along the cattle trail. This generates disconnection between the Amazonian plain — between the Guayabero and Cafre rivers — and the mountain range,” Botero says. For him, the negative impacts are getting bigger, not only because they obstruct species migration but also because they damage environmental services, affecting rainfall and water regulation capacity. “We are already seeing droughts and a decrease in surface runoff in the area.”A map showing deforestation in Serranía de Chiribiquete National Natural Park’s western sector, as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.A map showing deforestation in Nukak National Natural Reserve as of July 25, based on data from UMD/GLAD, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP, RAISG.Overflights and satellite data have been essential in evaluating the speed at which the expansion of the agricultural frontier in Tinigua and La Macarena is occurring, especially areas targeted for medium and large-scale livestock ranching. Coca crops are also present in some sectors of La Macarena; the illicit crops have also been found in the Nukak reserve, surrounding the Inírida River. The environmental damage in this area is not only due to deforestation but also to water contamination by chemical waste dumping into the river.For Botero, Colombia is not in the clear even though deforestation in the Amazon decreased by nearly 6,000 hectares (14,800 acres) between 2017 and 2018, according to IDEAM data. The decrease, however, is still very small compared to the 138,176 hectares (341,440 acres) that were lost last year. “Because every year we have less forest, the impact of deforestation is increasing,” he says. “The question is: has the forest been recovering?”Deforestation trends since 2015 in the four protected areas, based on data from Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, RUNAP. Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, coca plantations, Deforestation, Featured, Forests, Illegal Logging, National Parks, Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Tropical Forests A deforested landscape the northern Amazon of Colombia. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).Deforestation in Colombia, coupled with the fires in the Bolivian and Brazilian Amazon, poses new challenges for all countries that share the biome. In Colombia, experts believe that fighting deforestation is a governance issue that cannot be solved solely through the military-led enforcement approach of Operation Artemisa. The critical issue, they say, is access to land.“If you do not recover the lands from the people who grabbed more than half a million hectares of the Amazon in recent years, then impunity becomes a stimulus for crime, and therefore, thousands of hectares will continue to enter the illegal land market in Colombia,” Botero says.Banner image of burned land in the Colombian Amazon, where the fire season usually occurs between January and February. Image courtesy of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS).This is a translated version of a story that was first published in Spanish on Aug. 26, 2019. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Scientists emphasize disease control in booming aquaculture sector

first_imgThe World Organisation for Animal Health held a conference in Santiago, Chile, focused on aquatic animalsCompared with land animals, little is known about diseases of aquatic animals.Yet experts are looking to aquaculture to support human food security in the coming years. SANTIAGO, Chile — At its last global conference, held in April in Santiago, Chile, the World Organisation for Animal Health (known as OIE) focused on aquatic animals. The reason? Experts estimate that if the planet’s human population continues to increase as projected, the world will need to double its food production by 2050. The oceans, and aquaculture in particular, are seen as a main source for meeting this need.“For the past decade, fishing of native animals has stabilized while aquaculture has increased enormously,” Monique Eloit, the OIE’s director-general, told Mongabay Latam. However, information about the health of aquatic animals is poor compared with that of land animals. According to Eloit, this gap must be addressed to secure the food supply for the coming decades.Insufficient dataAround 60 percent of human pathogens and three-quarters of first-emerging infectious diseases are of animal origin. Among these are bird flu strain H5N1, rabies, tuberculosis, the Ebola virus, and foot-and-mouth disease.Since aquaculture is the fastest-growing food source, “it is likely that we will face greater health risks and challenges,” Eloit said. She recommended taking steps to improve disease management, biosecurity and the responsible use of antimicrobials.OIE conference in Santiago, Chile, in April. Image courtesy of OIE.To achieve these objectives, the OIE has been making efforts to gather information on aquatic-animal diseases and the measures being taken to prevent them. One such initiative involves the creation of a database on the use of antimicrobial agents in animals, mainly antibiotics. However, the aquatic-animal production sector has contributed considerably less data than the land-animal production sector, Eloit said.She said this is in part because businesses lack of transparency when reporting their use of antibiotics. “The industry must really understand that it can no longer avoid that question. It can no longer be ignored,” Eloit said.Giant clams grow in floating ocean cages in the Solomon Islands, circa 2001. Image by Mike McCoy/WorldFish Center.But more importantly, many countries have not institutionalized data collection, she said, and they are the entities that will need to generate more and better information, with the OIE serving as an adviser. “We cannot do it alone because we have limited powers,” Eloit said, adding that the countries “must organize themselves and ask for our support if they need it.”At this point, however, the evaluation is still deficient. The OIE has a global program called Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) that supports and advises countries to strengthen their national veterinary services and improve animal health. Although 140 countries have joined the program to improve their land-animal production sectors, only 13 have done so to strengthen their aquaculture and fisheries sectors.The disadvantages of aquacultureWhile the OIE conference was taking place in Chile’s capital, residents in the south of the country demonstrated in favor of expanding the country’s largest aquaculture industry: salmon.Chile is the world’s second-largest salmon producer (Norway is the biggest). However, a growing chorus of civil society actors, including fishermen, scientists and conservation professionals, have criticized this leadership because of the environmental impacts of various salmon cultivation operations. Among these is the generation of low-oxygen “dead zones” in the sea.Giant clam husbandry in the Solomon Islands, circa 2001. Image by Mike McCoy/WorldFish Center.Alicia Gallardo, director of the National Fisheries Service (Sernapesca), the Chilean government agency responsible for ensuring the protection of hydrobiological resources and their environment, said her office has applied “a very strict rule.”In 2007, an outbreak of infectious salmon anemia (ISA) occurred, which Gallardo described as “the worst health crisis in the history of the national salmon industry and that left more than 15,000 people unemployed.” At the time, she said, “there was no animal health area established within Sernapesca. So we have been taking foreign regulations and applying them at the highest level.”Yet 12 years after the ISA crisis, health problems persist in the salmon aquaculture industry. In 2016, 9,000 tons of dead salmon were dumped into the Chiloé Sea, intensifying a red tide outbreak that caused unprecedented fish mortality and a deep social and economic crisis. In 2018, almost 700,000 salmon escaped from breeding cages. The consequences remain unknown, but according to scientific predictions the escape could put populations of native species at risk.The OIE says it recognizes that biological stress caused by bad environmental or farming practices contributes negatively to the health status of an animal population. “Advances in breeding practices will be important to improve the health of aquatic animals,” Eloit said.Gallardo pointed out that Sernapesca is augmenting control measures out of an awareness that, as a leading country in Latin America, Chile has the responsibility to promote “adequate biosecurity and sustainability practices.” One such practice is surveillance through technology that allows difficult-to-access salmon production centers to be controlled. “While we cannot have an army of inspectors, we are incorporating remote inspection, which is probably the way to approach production centers that are far away,” Gallardo said.Salmon cages in Chile. Image by Daniel Casado.She said her agency is also promoting small-scale aquaculture.For Liesbeth van der Meer, director of the marine conservation NGO Oceana in Chile, that’s the only kind of aquaculture that should operate. “Native species like oysters and mussels, which can be cultivated, are adapted to our ecosystem and do not harm the environment,” she said. “The aquaculture that we believe can feed the world is the one that is concerned with maintaining ecosystem balance and that is developed on a small scale by the coastal communities themselves.”When it comes to food security, “salmon only feeds a small elite class that eats the orange fish,” van der Meer said. “What is going to have the greatest impact on feeding the world is the recovery of fish populations.”But small-scale aquaculture is not free of health problems, and influencing this is one of the OIE’s greatest challenges.Challenges and investing in science Aquaculture is a diverse sector in which large companies and small producers converge, the latter representing an important labor force. This is why one of the biggest challenges is not only addressing the private sector, which has large farming centers, but also, and above all, the small centers, Eloit said. Larger centers tend to be very well informed, and have tools and laboratories, while small centers “are not necessarily concerned with complying with international health standards” because they do not export products but feed a local or regional market, Eliot said.The second challenge is for countries that want to start a more industrial production to consider all the sanitary measures from the beginning. “This is a problem because we often imagine that it is enough to have the fish in the water and we have little awareness of safety measures and environmental protection,” Eloit said. In fact, in much of the world, biosecurity measures are not applied in aquaculture, so the OIE emphasizes the need to find a way to communicate its advantages.Small-scale purse seine fishers target squid and cuttlefish in Vietnam circa 2009. Image by David Mills/WorldFish Center.Even so, Eloit said she feels confident in a bright future for aquatic animal health “because we have seen presentations from countries that invest enormously, even though they are not developed countries.”Raul Avendaño, principal investigator of Chile’s Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR) and director of the Aquatic Organisms Pathology and Aquaculture Biotechnology Laboratory at Andrés Bello University in Santiago, said that “at present, science is an impressive engine of new proposals and solutions to health problems,” which is why “the aquaculture industry and regulatory bodies should seek support from researchers.”As an example Avendaño pointed to new vaccines that have proven very effective in controlling pathogens in aquatic animals. However, in Chile he noted that “the investment in science and technology is low and does not exceed 0.4 percent of the GDP, while in OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development] countries they have an average contribution of 2.4 percent.” For that reason, good projects tend to run out of funding, he said, forcing “professionals who carry out research in diseases to compete for the allocation of resources, rather than collaborating.”Recently, the Chilean government’s Strategic Investment Fund contributed $16.7 million and the salmon industry’s Salmon Technological Institute another $697,000 to generate knowledge associated with the main pathogen that threatens the salmon industry.Although this is an important sum, Avendaño said, “it remains to be seen whether this investment is sufficient, since the studies were carried out in a period of no more than 16 months and science requires more time to generate knowledge in an area that was not considered a priority in 30 years.”This story was first published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on April 22, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Aquaculture, Environment, Fish, Fish Farming, Fisheries, Food Industry, food security, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Saltwater Fish Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rebecca Kesslerlast_img read more

Grassroots campaign saves major wetland in Montenegro

first_imgCampaigners have saved the Ulcinj Salina in Montenegro from development after an 18-year campaign.They lobbied European Union ministers, mindful of fact that Montenegro’s leadership was looking to join the EU, but its poor environmental record was holding it back.They also used the influence of European diplomats to augment pressure on local officials and of the internet to broadcast their cause worldwide. They won local support with their plans for sustainable tourism. MONTENEGRO — “You see, they are coming, the visitors are coming,” says Jovana Janjušević as we walk along one of the trails that zig-zag across Ulcinj Salina, a diverse saltwater wetland in southern Montenegro.  “Now when we see people walking around, it is amazing… we fought for almost 18 years.”Covering 15 square kilometers (6 square miles), the salina is part of the Bojana-Buna estuary and one of the most important wetland areas in the Balkans. Thousands of birds rest here each year in the spring and autumn. Its significance to migratory birds is often compared to that of Heathrow Airport for humans, with nine times more birds passing through the salina than passengers through one of the world’s busiest airports.The Ulcinj Salina showing remnants of its old salt works as natural vegetation take over. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.For nearly two decades, a partnership including EuroNatur, the Martin Schneider Jacoby Association (MSJA) and the Center for Protection and Research of Birds (CZIP) has been working to protect the lagoon from development, with a campaign that has mixed traditional lobbying with the power of the internet and the world of diplomatic relations.The salina is the site of the old Bajo Sekulic salt works, which opened in 1926 and at its height employed over 450 local people, producing a high-quality salt billed as ‘a marriage of the sun and the sea.’Over the years there have been various attempts to protect the salina, which is also home to over 50 different species of nesting birds, including huge flocks of greater flamingo, rare Dalmatian pelicans, and diminutive black-winged stilts.Hunting was banned by the local worker’s council as early as 1984, when Montenegro was still part of the former Yugoslavia, and five years later the site was recognized as an Important Bird Area (IBA).Flamingos specialize on salt water habitats. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.In September 2019, the salina was also designated a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, putting additional pressure on the government to take the necessary steps to maintain and enhance the ecological character of the saltpans.Until 2005, the site was managed for salt production, with the careful maintenance of its channels and saline pools proving perfect for birdlife. But the situation changed dramatically in 2005 when the salina was privatized, with 75 percent of shares in the salt works bought for €800,000 ($890,000) by an investment company called Eurofond, in what EuroNatur has described as an ‘opaque process.’The unanswered question, explains Janjušević, executive director at CZIP, is whether the sale involved just the right to extract salt, or all the land as well. Eurofond claim the latter but according to the local land registry, the Montenegrin state is still the registered owner.In 2012, the salt company declared bankruptcy and halted production, allowing the site to rapidly deteriorate, with criminals destroying the pumps which were crucial to circulating water around the site and preserving the unique habitat.  As dams collapsed, fresh water flooded in, says Janjušević, deterring the migrant birds that thrive on the salt water.An old canal and roadway from the salt works still provides structure used by waterbirds. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.Eurofund also began lobbying hard for the designation of the salina to be changed from an industrial zone to land suitable for the construction of a tourist resort, putting forward plans for a marina, golf course and luxury hotel.The Save Salina Campaign launched a petition to oppose this change of use but, said Janjušević, only 3,000 local people signed it because many of them were afraid to put their name to the text. To prove citizenship, Montenegrins also have to give their ID number, she explained, and many people were unsure how this information would be used.The petition did initially meet with some success, and parliament recognized the salina as a ‘potential protected area,’ but the success was short-lived, and the decision was overturned by the courts on appeal in 2015. However, the partners were allowed to tentatively start promoting the site, with the creation of a small souvenir shop, interpretation boards and even bike hire. But access was eventually denied, as the factory’s bankruptcy proceedings were completed.The old factory and workshops at the entrance to the salina now lie derelict as gradually the whole site was dismantled, with everything of any value stripped out, including the pumps that CZIP installed to help increase the flow of water around the salt pans.But the campaigners had a secret weapon; they had arranged a special VIP visit to the site, which was attended by the ambassadors from the German, French and Polish embassies. All of a sudden, the campaign had friends in high places and the fate of the salina could no longer be ignored.Jovana Janjušević, executive director at the Center for Protection and Research of Birds (CZIP). Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.“When you have people saying something is important but they are just a bunch of ornithologists, it can be ignored,” said Janjušević. “But when you have an ambassador saying it, then it’s fact, no one questions it.”Diplomats are taught not to meddle, she added, but they can ask questions and that can ‘make the government sweat.’A key figure proved to be the former German ambassador, Gudrun Steinbacker. “In the course of our interventions and through our own investigations and those of relevant NGOs… we got to know more about the corruption around the privatization of the salina and made it public,” said Steinbacker. It was, she added: “a very questionable privatization.”“Montenegro is in the course of [European Union] accession and has to implement EU standards, especially in the field of environment and nature conservation,” Steinbacker said. “There is a huge gap between documents and reality on the ground. We ambassadors from EU countries have a right to take note of these gaps and appeal to the government to improve the standards.”Without Steinbacker’s support, said Michael Bader, who rents tourist accommodation in Ulcinj: “we wouldn’t be where we are today… It pushed everything to a higher, international level.”While the campaign had already been lobbying key EU ministers, the diplomatic pressure significantly raised the profile of the salina, to the extent that it became central to Montenegro’s efforts to join the EU. It is now included in the government’s annual progress reports to the EU, and protection of the salina has been set as benchmark for future EU accession. In 2017, an EU study said that the salina should be revitalized, with the Montenegrin government agreeing that salt production should be re-established.Campaigners also launched a second petition to afford the site protected status, this time harnessing the power of the internet and the WeMove platform to gain over 100,000 signatures in just two weeks. The petition resonated with people around the world, said Janjušević, and put further pressure on the Government until in June this year the site finally received protected area status as a Nature Park.The Ulcinj Salina, with remaining salt works infrastructure, supports a wide variety of migratory waterbirds. Covering 15 square kilometers (6 square miles), it’s part of the Bojana-Buna estuary and one of the most important wetland areas in the Balkans. Thousands of birds rest here each year in the spring and autumn. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.According to Montenegrin law, explained Janjušević, the power to designate sites below national park status lies with the local authority, although in this case the national government was also involved “because the pressure from the EU went straight to them, not to the local municipality.”“Perseverance finally pays off,” said EuroNatur CEO Gabriel Schwaderer. “The town council’s decision offers the opportunity to really preserve and revitalise the salina. It’s been a long struggle.”“We will closely track the further developments,” he added. “The Nature Park logo must not become a fig leaf for the government.”The key elements of the protection are that salt production is to be re-introduced and activities such as cycling and birdwatching will be encouraged, but no new buildings are to be constructed.“This victory for nature is a unique example of people struggling for birds,” Janjušević said. “Against all pushback, against spatial planning, investors’ desires, industry and bare figures.”She said the monitoring and bird surveys local birdwatchers carry out supported their efforts.  “We have based everything on science, not just our feelings… We use scientific methods that are proven – then you have something in your hands that you can fight the decision makers with.”The campaign also tapped into local affection for the site and was able to show local people that the proposed luxury tourist development would not only destroy the salina but also provide poorly paid, often temporary jobs. Instead, they are now developing a sustainable tourism plan that promotes a more diverse range of stable jobs based around nature tourism, as well the health benefits and spa potential of the salina’s mud and salt.“I think tourism is going in another direction, and people are looking to have less impact on nature,” Bader said. “Tourists are already coming, even without big marketing, they are coming. If you push this a little bit then this area will be full of visitors, and that’s the sustainable tourism that Ulcinj needs.”The salina now has Nature Park status, achieved after years of campaigns and with the help of several European diplomats. Image by Mark Hillson for Mongabay.But winning Nature Park status is far from the end of the story, and the campaign is set to continue applying pressure and raising awareness until this unique habitat is brought back to full health.Conserving the biodiversity of the salina requires the same level of water management as salt production, said Janjušević, and an estimated €10 million ($11,150,000) is needed to restore it.But despite the fact the second petition called on the Government to identify the true owners of the site, prime minister Duško Marković has yet to respond. “The next step must be to find out who is the real owners,” Bader said. “If you don’t know who is the owner, you will not get an investor.” Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation Solutions, Freshwater Ecosystems, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Migration, Protected Areas, Wetlands, Wildlife FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

2018 New Year Message from Leader of the Opposition, Dr. Peter Phillips

first_img Good governance, requires those in government to see themselves as stewards and guardians of public resources, which are to be spent for the public good rather than private benefit. As we confront the challenges of 2018, may God bless you all and may God bless Jamaica Land we love. Let me wish all of you a happy, safe and productive New Year. Story Highlights Let me wish all of you a happy, safe and productive New Year.As we usher in 2018, let us thank the Almighty for his many blessings that have sustained this past year.Even as we endured floods and the stresses of climate change, we were nevertheless spared the widespread devastation of the hurricanes which affected others in the region.Unfortunately, much of the difficulties we experienced during the past year were the result of failures of government policy.With the run-away murder rate that the country has experienced this past year, we extend our heartfelt sympathies to the many families that have suffered the loss of loved ones.Economic growth rates remain below expectations and the incomes of many workers, especially those in the public sector, have stagnated.I think I speak for the majority of well-thinking Jamaicans in expressing hope that the wage negotiations between the government and the public sector workers, including the Police, Teachers, and Health Workers, will be speedily concluded on the basis of mutual respect and realism.It is important that the government recognizes the tremendous sacrifices that have been made by these workers on behalf of the country in the recent past as the Economic Reform Programme got underway to put the country on sound footing.Surmounting these and other challenges will require a full-fledged and comprehensive mobilisation of the nation’s will. In turn, such a revitalisation of the nation’s spirit can only take place, if it is accompanied by a recommitment to high standards of governance.There must be no place for corruption or cronyism which as the Contractor General has suggested has become a feature of recent governmental operations. This is evident in the now infamous $600 Million Bushing Programme and also raises its head in the used car scandal the results of which have also hindered the efforts of the Police.Good governance, requires those in government to see themselves as stewards and guardians of public resources, which are to be spent for the public good rather than private benefit.Government officials must see themselves as subject to laws, rather than as breakers of the law whether in search of electoral or other partisan advantage. Good governance requires, too, that Jamaica protects its reputation internationally in the United Nations and elsewhere as a country that stands by its long-held principle as a defender of the causes of peace, self-determination and the rule of international law.Only by supporting these principles can small countries like ours be assured of our independence and our survival, in a world where some believe that “might is right”.Yet, for all this and despite all the challenges that we face the arrival of a New Year should give us hope. Our hope is in the resilience, tenacity, courage and good sense of the Jamaican people. Our hope rests on Jamaica’s long history and the great heritage of our forefathers and mothers who have overcome the challenges of centuries of history against great odds.As Opposition Leader, I pledge vigilance, moral courage and a willingness to have dialogue, and collaborate on initiatives that serve the national interest. My Shadow Cabinet and I will continue to play our part in holding the government accountable as we advocate for a better Jamaica that works for all, and not just a few.Now is the time for all of us in our families, in our churches, in our classrooms, and at our work places and on the corner to do what we can to bring an end to the scourge of violence and bloodshed that has spread across the country. Let each of us counsel peace, instead of war. Let us all make our contribution to the demand for higher standards of transparency and integrity in governance.The foundation of any country is its people, and their values and the courage and resilience that they apply in the face of the challenges of life. Let us resolve that in the course of this year we shall all redouble our efforts to build a Jamaica of peace and social justice, and which offers hope and opportunity and a real chance in life for all Jamaicans.As we confront the challenges of 2018, may God bless you all and may God bless Jamaica Land we love.last_img read more

270 Containers Fall from MSC Zoe amid Heavy Weather

first_imgAround 270 containers are estimated to have fallen overboard from MSC Zoe, an ultra large containership owned by Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), while the boxship was battling heavy weather on its journey toward Bremerhaven, Germany, on January 2.The Dutch Coast Guard informed that at least 21 containers have washed ashore at the beaches of Vlieland, Terschelling and Ameland, adding that there are still containers in the water. The coast guard said on Wednesday that interested parties should not help with the cleaning activities as there are three unlocalized containers ​that could contain hazardous materials.According to the latest update from Germany’s Central Command for Maritime Emergencies (Havariekommando), some of the containers that went overboard have already been spotted, including six in German waters. However, it is yet to be determined whether a container with dangerous goods had been among those that went overboard.“MSC has started a clean-up operation in response to a substantial spill of containers in the North Sea,” MSC said in a statement today.“Unfortunately, a number of the containers were damaged or lost overboard amid very difficult conditions.”Image Courtesy: HavariekommandoThe Swiss-based containership owner has appointed a salvage company to coordinate the retrieval of cargo and beach clean-up operations and is also deploying specialised ships equipped with sonar to search for missing cargo at sea.“MSC takes this incident very seriously, both in terms of the impact of such accidents on the natural environment and in terms of any damage to customers’ cargo. In all aspects of the clean-up MSC is collaborating with local authorities,” the company added.“MSC will ensure that customers who seek further information receive direct communications in the coming days. They are invited to contact local MSC representatives.”MSC Zoe proceeded to Bremerhaven for cargo discharge operations. The German authorities said that the ship moored at Bremerhaven at 00:35 this morning after being accompanied to the port by the multipurpose vessel Neuwerk.MSC said it was analyzing the causes of the incident.Image Courtesy: Havariekommando; Kustwachtlast_img read more