Grassroots campaign saves major wetland in Montenegro

first_imgCampaigners have saved the Ulcinj Salina in Montenegro from development after an 18-year campaign.They lobbied European Union ministers, mindful of fact that Montenegro’s leadership was looking to join the EU, but its poor environmental record was holding it back.They also used the influence of European diplomats to augment pressure on local officials and of the internet to broadcast their cause worldwide. They won local support with their plans for sustainable tourism. MONTENEGRO — “You see, they are coming, the visitors are coming,” says Jovana Janjušević as we walk along one of the trails that zig-zag across Ulcinj Salina, a diverse saltwater wetland in southern Montenegro.  “Now when we see people walking around, it is amazing… we fought for almost 18 years.”Covering 15 square kilometers (6 square miles), the salina is part of the Bojana-Buna estuary and one of the most important wetland areas in the Balkans. Thousands of birds rest here each year in the spring and autumn. Its significance to migratory birds is often compared to that of Heathrow Airport for humans, with nine times more birds passing through the salina than passengers through one of the world’s busiest airports.The Ulcinj Salina showing remnants of its old salt works as natural vegetation take over. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.For nearly two decades, a partnership including EuroNatur, the Martin Schneider Jacoby Association (MSJA) and the Center for Protection and Research of Birds (CZIP) has been working to protect the lagoon from development, with a campaign that has mixed traditional lobbying with the power of the internet and the world of diplomatic relations.The salina is the site of the old Bajo Sekulic salt works, which opened in 1926 and at its height employed over 450 local people, producing a high-quality salt billed as ‘a marriage of the sun and the sea.’Over the years there have been various attempts to protect the salina, which is also home to over 50 different species of nesting birds, including huge flocks of greater flamingo, rare Dalmatian pelicans, and diminutive black-winged stilts.Hunting was banned by the local worker’s council as early as 1984, when Montenegro was still part of the former Yugoslavia, and five years later the site was recognized as an Important Bird Area (IBA).Flamingos specialize on salt water habitats. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.In September 2019, the salina was also designated a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, putting additional pressure on the government to take the necessary steps to maintain and enhance the ecological character of the saltpans.Until 2005, the site was managed for salt production, with the careful maintenance of its channels and saline pools proving perfect for birdlife. But the situation changed dramatically in 2005 when the salina was privatized, with 75 percent of shares in the salt works bought for €800,000 ($890,000) by an investment company called Eurofond, in what EuroNatur has described as an ‘opaque process.’The unanswered question, explains Janjušević, executive director at CZIP, is whether the sale involved just the right to extract salt, or all the land as well. Eurofond claim the latter but according to the local land registry, the Montenegrin state is still the registered owner.In 2012, the salt company declared bankruptcy and halted production, allowing the site to rapidly deteriorate, with criminals destroying the pumps which were crucial to circulating water around the site and preserving the unique habitat.  As dams collapsed, fresh water flooded in, says Janjušević, deterring the migrant birds that thrive on the salt water.An old canal and roadway from the salt works still provides structure used by waterbirds. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.Eurofund also began lobbying hard for the designation of the salina to be changed from an industrial zone to land suitable for the construction of a tourist resort, putting forward plans for a marina, golf course and luxury hotel.The Save Salina Campaign launched a petition to oppose this change of use but, said Janjušević, only 3,000 local people signed it because many of them were afraid to put their name to the text. To prove citizenship, Montenegrins also have to give their ID number, she explained, and many people were unsure how this information would be used.The petition did initially meet with some success, and parliament recognized the salina as a ‘potential protected area,’ but the success was short-lived, and the decision was overturned by the courts on appeal in 2015. However, the partners were allowed to tentatively start promoting the site, with the creation of a small souvenir shop, interpretation boards and even bike hire. But access was eventually denied, as the factory’s bankruptcy proceedings were completed.The old factory and workshops at the entrance to the salina now lie derelict as gradually the whole site was dismantled, with everything of any value stripped out, including the pumps that CZIP installed to help increase the flow of water around the salt pans.But the campaigners had a secret weapon; they had arranged a special VIP visit to the site, which was attended by the ambassadors from the German, French and Polish embassies. All of a sudden, the campaign had friends in high places and the fate of the salina could no longer be ignored.Jovana Janjušević, executive director at the Center for Protection and Research of Birds (CZIP). Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.“When you have people saying something is important but they are just a bunch of ornithologists, it can be ignored,” said Janjušević. “But when you have an ambassador saying it, then it’s fact, no one questions it.”Diplomats are taught not to meddle, she added, but they can ask questions and that can ‘make the government sweat.’A key figure proved to be the former German ambassador, Gudrun Steinbacker. “In the course of our interventions and through our own investigations and those of relevant NGOs… we got to know more about the corruption around the privatization of the salina and made it public,” said Steinbacker. It was, she added: “a very questionable privatization.”“Montenegro is in the course of [European Union] accession and has to implement EU standards, especially in the field of environment and nature conservation,” Steinbacker said. “There is a huge gap between documents and reality on the ground. We ambassadors from EU countries have a right to take note of these gaps and appeal to the government to improve the standards.”Without Steinbacker’s support, said Michael Bader, who rents tourist accommodation in Ulcinj: “we wouldn’t be where we are today… It pushed everything to a higher, international level.”While the campaign had already been lobbying key EU ministers, the diplomatic pressure significantly raised the profile of the salina, to the extent that it became central to Montenegro’s efforts to join the EU. It is now included in the government’s annual progress reports to the EU, and protection of the salina has been set as benchmark for future EU accession. In 2017, an EU study said that the salina should be revitalized, with the Montenegrin government agreeing that salt production should be re-established.Campaigners also launched a second petition to afford the site protected status, this time harnessing the power of the internet and the WeMove platform to gain over 100,000 signatures in just two weeks. The petition resonated with people around the world, said Janjušević, and put further pressure on the Government until in June this year the site finally received protected area status as a Nature Park.The Ulcinj Salina, with remaining salt works infrastructure, supports a wide variety of migratory waterbirds. Covering 15 square kilometers (6 square miles), it’s part of the Bojana-Buna estuary and one of the most important wetland areas in the Balkans. Thousands of birds rest here each year in the spring and autumn. Image by Mark Hillsdon for Mongabay.According to Montenegrin law, explained Janjušević, the power to designate sites below national park status lies with the local authority, although in this case the national government was also involved “because the pressure from the EU went straight to them, not to the local municipality.”“Perseverance finally pays off,” said EuroNatur CEO Gabriel Schwaderer. “The town council’s decision offers the opportunity to really preserve and revitalise the salina. It’s been a long struggle.”“We will closely track the further developments,” he added. “The Nature Park logo must not become a fig leaf for the government.”The key elements of the protection are that salt production is to be re-introduced and activities such as cycling and birdwatching will be encouraged, but no new buildings are to be constructed.“This victory for nature is a unique example of people struggling for birds,” Janjušević said. “Against all pushback, against spatial planning, investors’ desires, industry and bare figures.”She said the monitoring and bird surveys local birdwatchers carry out supported their efforts.  “We have based everything on science, not just our feelings… We use scientific methods that are proven – then you have something in your hands that you can fight the decision makers with.”The campaign also tapped into local affection for the site and was able to show local people that the proposed luxury tourist development would not only destroy the salina but also provide poorly paid, often temporary jobs. Instead, they are now developing a sustainable tourism plan that promotes a more diverse range of stable jobs based around nature tourism, as well the health benefits and spa potential of the salina’s mud and salt.“I think tourism is going in another direction, and people are looking to have less impact on nature,” Bader said. “Tourists are already coming, even without big marketing, they are coming. If you push this a little bit then this area will be full of visitors, and that’s the sustainable tourism that Ulcinj needs.”The salina now has Nature Park status, achieved after years of campaigns and with the help of several European diplomats. Image by Mark Hillson for Mongabay.But winning Nature Park status is far from the end of the story, and the campaign is set to continue applying pressure and raising awareness until this unique habitat is brought back to full health.Conserving the biodiversity of the salina requires the same level of water management as salt production, said Janjušević, and an estimated €10 million ($11,150,000) is needed to restore it.But despite the fact the second petition called on the Government to identify the true owners of the site, prime minister Duško Marković has yet to respond. “The next step must be to find out who is the real owners,” Bader said. “If you don’t know who is the owner, you will not get an investor.” Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation Solutions, Freshwater Ecosystems, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Migration, Protected Areas, Wetlands, Wildlife FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Female gorillas recognize and respond to contagious disease

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animal Behavior, Animals, Gorillas, Great Apes, Mammals, Primates, UCSC, Wildlife Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img An infectious skin disease causing bright red facial lesions affects how female gorillas decide to change social groups, researchers have shown.Decade-long observations of nearly 600 gorillas in the Republic of the Congo revealed females are more likely to leave groups with severely diseased females or an infected silverback male.By reducing contact with sick individuals, females can decrease the risk of being contaminated and prevent further spread of the infection in the population. Salt clearings deep in the Congo basin host numerous breeding groups of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). These intelligent social mammals usually reside in groups of two to eight females defended by a single silverback male. Now, long-term studies of these populations show that female gorillas can identify a disfiguring disease in one another, and they consciously avoid it through informed social dispersal to other groups.A team led by Nelly Ménard of the ECOBIO laboratory at CNRS/University of Rennes 1 used a decade of observations to conclude that gorillas recognize a contagious skin infection called yaws in other individuals. Female members of a breeding group take the disease into account when deciding whether to migrate to another group.The findings, published recently in Ecology, suggest that females are more likely to change groups when the red facial lesions caused by yaws are visible either in the silverback or among multiple females in their breeding group. They also avoid joining groups with a high prevalence of the disease.Odzala-Kokua National Park in the Republic of Congo. Photo by A. Lavandier/CNRS-University of Rennes 1When Ménard first visited the Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Republic of the Congo nearly 20 years ago, she recognized that the frequent visits by gorilla social groups provided access to exceptional data on the demographic structure of their populations – as well as their dispersal patterns. During their years in the field, her team identified 593 individuals, divided into 59 breeding groups and 50 unmated units, clustered within two distinct populations of gorillas.Females move between breeding groups several times during their lifespan. The researchers recorded dozens of instances when females left their own groups or joined new ones. Both of the studied populations live in the same dense tropical forest with overlapping home ranges, so habitat was not a factor in the females’ decisions to change groups. In all cases where both the old and new groups were known, females moved to new groups with fewer numbers of severely infected gorillas.A female was more likely to leave her breeding group when there were more severely diseased individuals, when her breeding group was older, or when the male silverback was infected, the team’s observations showed.“We suspected that females were able to take the disease risk into account in their decision to leave or to join a group,” said Ménard. These perceptive apes most likely associate the visual cues of red facial lesions with the worsening effects of the disease, like deformities and handicaps, she said.This infant was likely contaminated through contact with its mother. Photo by Peggy Motsch and Guillaume Le Flohic/CNRS-University of Rennes 1Close contact with its mother may have led to the infection of this infant at a young age. Photo by Peggy Motsch and Guillaume Le Flohic/CNRS-University of Rennes 1Other studies have shown that spiny lobster, ants, mosquitofish, and house mice avoid others of their species who are visibly sick, said Dieter Lukas, a senior researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, Germany, who was not involved in the study. Among primates, mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) will avoid grooming others who are infected with endoparasites. However, the finding by Ménard’s team appears to be the first case of social mammals “choosing which group to join according to the disease status of the other group members,” Lukas said.There is still a social toll when females leave familiar breeding groups, such as lower status in new groups or delayed mating opportunities. Females also hesitate to migrate if they have an unweaned infant, fearing infanticide. The animals weigh these risks, Lukas noted: “The interesting observation is that female gorillas might be willing to pay a short-term cost… in order to potentially avoid a long-term cost associated with contracting a disease.”Ménard is curious whether other primates, such as chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), show similar behaviors. “The few [chimpanzees] who visited the study clearings did not show any signs of this disease,” she said. However, a chimpanzee population being studied in Uganda displays facial deformities due to ingesting pesticides, offering a research opportunity: “It would be very interesting to test whether these [deformities] impact social relationships.”A yaws-infected adult gorilla with red lesions mainly located on its face. Photo by Céline Genton/Université de Rennes 1Citation: Baudouin, A., Gatti, S., Levréro, F., Genton, C., Cristescu, R. H., Billy, V., … Ménard, N. (2019). Disease avoidance, and breeding group age and size condition the dispersal patterns of western lowland gorilla females. Ecology, 100(9). https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2786Lara Streiff (@LaraGStreiff) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found at news.mongabay.com/list/ucsc.last_img read more

Coal spill bedevils Indonesian beach more than a year later

first_imgCoal from a barge that spilled onto a beach in Indonesia’s Aceh province in July 2018 still hasn’t been fully cleaned up.Lampuuk Beach, on the northern tip of Sumatra, is hosting a surfing championship this weekend, but participants and residents say that coal continues to litter and contaminate the site.The coal was destined for a power plant run by a cement producer, which had experienced an identical spill in 2016 at a nearby beach.While authorities have ordered the cement producer to clean up the site, the company says the barge operator should be held responsible. BANDA ACEH, Indonesia — Nearly a year and a half ago, a barge hit by high waves spilled an estimated 7,000 tonnes coal on a beach in Sumatra popular with surfers. This weekend, as the beach hosts a surfing contest, it still hasn’t been fully cleaned up.“We surfers have called on every stakeholder to deal seriously with this coal spill,” Zaki Mulia, a member of the local Lhoknga Surf Team, told Mongabay Indonesia. “Some of the coal was indeed removed, but not all of it.”The coal came from the barge TB Marina, which on July 30, 2018, was buffeted by strong waves just 100 meters (330 feet) off Lampuuk Beach in Aceh province. Much of the cargo, destined for a coal-fired power plant at a factory operated by a local subsidiary of cement giant LafargeHolcim, was spilled. Since then, say surfers and residents, the provincial government has failed to adequately clean up the beach, which hosts this year’s Aceh Surfing Championship from Nov. 23-24.Coal on Lampuuk Beach in Aceh Besar district, Aceh province, after the July 30, 2018, spill. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.According to Zaki, the Aceh government had ordered PT Solusi Bangun Andalas (SBA) to clean up the coal spill, but the company reportedly refused to do so and instead argued that the barge operator should bear responsibility for the cleanup.Abdul Muchti, a councilor in Aceh Besar district, where both the beach and the cement factory are located, said neither the plant’s current operator, PT SBA, nor the barge operator had publicly stated how much coal was spilled in the incident, making it difficult to assess the scale of the pollution.“Many people depend on this [beach] for their livelihoods,” Abdul said.An online video clip shot recently by a resident showed black particles, believed to be coal, found inside a dead pufferfish washed up on Lampuuk Beach.“The government must push the company to find solutions for the damage to the marine ecosystem — not just removing coal from sea to land,” said Muhammad Yulfan, who shot the video.A recently made video shows black particles, believed to be coal, inside a dead pufferfish. Image by Muhammad Yulfan.A dead pufferfish on a carpet of coal on Lampuuk Beach. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.The 2018 spill mirrors an accident in 2016 when another of the cement company’s coal barges also dumped tonnes of coal onto a neighboring beach. As with the later incident, there was no accountability for the 2016 spill, according to the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).Under a 2009 law, such accidents constitute a clear violation of environmental management standards, for which perpetrators can face up to three years in jail and fines of up to 3 billion rupiah ($213,000).In an announcement on Nov. 14, PT SBA said it would carry out a second cleanup at the beach. The company has been a government-controlled entity since February, after a divestment by PT Lafarge Cement Indonesia, the local unit of Swiss-based LafargeHolcim.Indonesia is one of the world’s biggest producers of coal, but has paid a heavy price through the massive deforestation wrought to mine the fossil fuel, as well as the numerous environmental and safety incidents associated with it.Coal from the July 2018 spill on the beach. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Nov. 11, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Coal, Coastal Ecosystems, Coral Reefs, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corporations, Environment, Environmental Law, Fish, Fisheries, Law Enforcement, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Oceans, Pollution, Saltwater Fish, Water Pollution center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more