Sinn Fein councillor allays fears over school closures

first_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ A Sinn Fein Councillor in Strabane has accused an SDLP representative of reckless scaremongering for claiming that rural schools could close in West Tyrone.Speaking on Highland Radio News during the week West Tyrone MLA, Joe Byrne claimed that 40 rural schools in Tyrone were under threat.And he claimed that schools who didn’t have 105 pupils or more were the ones under threat of closure from the SF Education Minister.But SF Cllr Maoliosa McHugh says no school will close because they don’t have a certain amount of pupils:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/mmc10.mp3[/podcast] Pinterest Google+ Donegal hoteliers enjoy morale boost as bookings increase Pinterest 45 new social homes to be built in Dungloe Facebook Disruption to cancer service will increase mortality – Oncologist Hospitalisations rise as Donnelly suggests masks will stay ’til autumn center_img Sinn Fein councillor allays fears over school closures By News Highland – December 7, 2013 Facebook WhatsApp Today is the 30th anniversary of Eddie Fullerton’s murder News Previous articleMan convicted of musician’s manslaughter in Derry has his probation revokedNext articleDonegal Gathering to go ahead again next year News Highland Twitter Twitter Consultation launched on proposal to limit HGV traffic in Cladylast_img read more

Women’s faces get redder at ovulation, but human eyes can’t pick up on it

first_imgShare on Twitter Previous studies have shown that men find female faces more attractive when the women are ovulating, but the visual clues that allow this are unclear. Now, new research investigating whether it might be to do with subtle changes in skin colour has shown that women’s faces do increase in redness during ovulation, but the levels of change are just under the detectable range of the human eye.Researchers say this may mean that facial redness in females was once an involuntary signal for optimal fertility, but has since been “dampened” by evolution as it is more beneficial for females to hide or control outward signs of peak fertility.Involuntarily signalling ovulation can prevent longer-term investment from males. In primate species that advertise ovulation, males only express sexual interest in females when they appear to be fertile. In humans, ovulation is less conspicuous and sexual behaviour is not restricted to the period of peak fertility. Share on Facebook Email Pinterestcenter_img The research, published today in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, is the most complete objective study of female faces during the ovulatory cycle, say researchers. Twenty-two women were photographed without make-up at the same time every working day for at least one month in the same environment and using a scientific camera modified to more accurately capture colour (usually used for studying camouflage in wildlife).A computer programme was designed to select an identical patch of cheek from each photograph. The participants also self-tested for hormone changes at key times dictated by the research team’s “period maths”.A surge in luteinising hormone told researchers that ovulation would occur in roughly the next 24 hours, so they knew which photographs were taken when the women were most fertile. The team converted the imagery into red/green/blue (RGB) values to measure colour levels and changes.They found that redness varied significantly across the ovulatory cycle, peaking at ovulation and remaining high during the latter stages of the cycle after oestrogen levels have fallen. Skin redness then dips considerably once menstruation begins. The research suggests facial redness closely maps fluctuations in body temperature during the cycle.However, when running the results through models of human visual perception, the largest average difference in redness was 0.6 units. A change of 2.2 units are needed to be detectable to the naked human eye.“Women don’t advertise ovulation, but they do seem to leak information about it, as studies have shown they are seen as more attractive by men when ovulating,” said Dr Hannah Rowland, from the University of Cambridge’s Zoology Department, who led the study with Dr Robert Burriss, a psychologist from Northumbria University.“We had thought facial skin colour might be an outward signal for ovulation, as it is in other primates, but this study shows facial redness is not what men are picking up on – although it could be a small piece of a much larger puzzle,” she said.Primates, including humans, are attracted to red, say the study’s authors. Women may subconsciously augment the naturally-occurring facial redness during ovulation through make-up such as blusher or red clothing, they say.“As far back as the 1970s, scientists were speculating that involuntary signals of fertility such as skin colour changes might be replaced with voluntary signals, such as clothing and behaviour,” said Burriss. “Some species of primate advertise their fertility through changes in the colour of their faces. Even if humans once advertised ovulation in this way, it appears that we don’t anymore.”It may be that, during ovulation, women have a greater propensity for blushing when around men they find attractive, say the researchers. “Other research has shown that when women are in the fertile phase of their cycle they are more flirtatious and their pupils dilate more readily, but only when they are thinking about or interacting with attractive men,” said Burriss. “We will need to do more research to find out if skin redness changes in the same way”.Rowland and Burriss first conceived of the experiment seven years ago, but it wasn’t until Rowland arrived at Cambridge that they were able to do the research, thanks to the University’s collegiate system. “We were able to recruit undergraduates in a number of colleges and photograph the women just before they had dinner in the college hall every evening. The collegiate routines and networks were vital to collecting data with such regularity,” said Rowland. Share LinkedInlast_img read more

Five stages of fasting in the body

first_imgIt’s almost Eid and soon we will be saying goodbye to the holy month – and this is the last column in this series.During the first 20 days of fasting, I felt my body slowly adjusting to the routine and by day 20 I felt lighter, more energetic and productive than before. But what has really been happening to my body function while I was fasting?Tasneem Johnson, a dietitian, explained that there are five stages to the 30-day fast. Each stage represents a change in body functions for various reasons.Stage 1 (day 1 and 2)Here the body adjusts to the drop in the amount of glucose and water in the blood and tissues by drawing sugar from sugar stores in the muscles, liver and kidneys; and lowering the blood pressure. Your body will also begin to make glucose from things like fat and amino acids to ensure that it has enough energy. This is the stage which is usually the most difficult, and where you’re more likely to experience dizziness, nausea and hunger pangs.Stage 2 (day 3 to 7)At this point the body has become more accustomed to lowered blood glucose levels and switches to ketosis, where it uses fats as the primary source of energy. This ups your body’s fat-burning capacity as the body draws on fat stores.Stage 3 (day 8 to 15)Since the gut is less active during this time, it’s also exposed to less stress – from things like heartburn, indigestion and food toxins. This means that it has time to rest and repair. At this point, the body takes advantage of the fact that your digestive system is “resting” and directs the energy that would have been used by the gut to the immune system. This increases immune functions, meaning that the immune cells of your body can focus on healing the other areas of the body too.Stage 4 (day 16 to 30)During this stage the healing and detoxification of the body continues and you can experience ongoing improvements in your health because of the continued healing and cleansing.Stage 5This is where you end your fast and begin to eat during the day again. Ms Johnson said that during this stage one should be cautious as the improvements you’ve made to your health during Ramadaan can be reversed if you begin to eat too much food or a diet that isn’t high in nutrients.She advised not to fall back into bad eating habits and that it’s best to eat smaller portions of food or foods that are easier to digest – like broths and steamed vegetables – during the day to ease your digestive system back into non-fasting mode.Ms Johnson said you can continue to fast beyond Ramadaan, as long as you maintain a balanced diet throughout this time.Fasting is something that you can continue to do throughout the year, but you need to focus on healthy eating to maintain good health during this period.To ensure that you are staying healthy make sure that you eat balanced meals at breakfast and supper time and drink enough water.You can also take regular breaks from fasting to ensure that you are providing your body with everything it needs.It’s not recommended to fast by skipping breakfast or supper because eating breakfast provides your body with important nutrients for daily functions, and sparks your metabolism, allowing your body to function at its best throughout the day and eating supper replenishes the body’s stores and provides the body with nutrients for body functions while you sleep.I hope everyone will continue cultivating a good lifestyle after Ramadaan and may you all celebrate a healthy Eid.last_img read more

Gela-Mosby: Talent in PNG to play at NRL level

first_imgRugby League BY SIMON KESLEP Northern Pride and NRL North Queensland Cowboys contract winger Gedion Gela-Mosby reckons PNG rugby league players can stamp their mark at NRL level. Speaking to the Post-Courier last Sunday after their impressive 24-0 win over SP PNG Hunters at the Oil Search National Football stadium, a smiling Gela-Mosby said he reckons if PNG get a chance he would love to see a lot of them (PNG players) playing at NRL. “I reckon they will make a pretty big impression coming up to the NRL and it will be good to see a lot of them playing,” he said. Visiting Intrust Super Cup teams with the inclusion of NRL contracted players coming up to PNG also gives the local players a morale boost playing in PNG Rugby Football League’s junior schoolboys competition and also the SP PNG Hunters team. “I reckon it will be a boost and it will give the PNG boys a good head space and feeling knowing that there a some good players playing. It will give more confidence as well.” He said their team’s performance against Hunters was solid but few things they will need to work on and full credit to them for putting on hard effort. “I give credit back to the home team for playing hard and that is why I love playing against them,” he said. Gela-Mosby’s game last Sunday was outstanding, especially having a hand in backline plays, switching to fullback from the wing and giving a hard time with his defensive efforts. Asked if he enjoyed the game, he replied it was always a good, competitive and strong physical game playing against the Hunters players both up in PNG and also back in Australia. He was also able to give information relating to his close ties with PNG but his parents told him he was born in Torres Strait. “In my family generations, my great grandparents or what we call “Ateh” are from PNG but I fall through my upcoming growing in Torres Strait.”last_img read more

Proteas relishing starting World Cup against No 1

first_imgProteas coach Ottis Gibson said on Tuesday that he is pleased his team will start their World Cup campaign against hosts and world number one’s England at The Oval on Thursday because “they will show us exactly where we are”.“Playing against the number one team, that’s the best way to start because they will give us a real sense of where we are, they will show us exactly where we are. But it’s just one game and one shouldn’t read too much into it. It’s obviously still a big game, but if we don’t win then it won’t really matter. We will try everything to win, obviously, because it’s our first opportunity to get some momentum.ALSO READ: Proteas won’t be bothered by ‘chokers’ tag, says Kallis“But in the last five World Cups, how many times has the number one ranked team won? [not since Australia’s 2003 triumph in South Africa] So you don’t have to be number one to win the tournament and even if you win the World Cup, you don’t necessarily go to number one. So not being number one is not a big issue for us,” Gibson, who is a former England bowling coach, said at The Oval on Tuesday.What does count in South Africa’s favour though is that they have players coming into the tournament in fine form. Quinton de Kock (3rd) and Faf du Plessis (18th) were both among the top-20 run-scorers in this year’s IPL, Imran Tahir and Kagiso Rabada were the leading wicket-takers, while even Chris Morris was 15th and was the second most economical bowler in the death overs behind Indian sensation Jasprit Bumrah. Dale Steyn finished ninth in the averages.For Gibson, the challenge is now the co-ordination of all those stars into a winning 50-overs outfit.“The difference between T20 and 50-overs cricket is vast, especially in terms of time on your feet and having to bat really well against the new ball. But in the 24 hours before our first game, we’ll just be chilling out and relaxed. We’ll have a couple of tactical meetings to plan for England, but the World Cup brings its own pressure so we’re just handling it like it’s just another cricket match.“We want to play to our strengths and probably be a bit more expansive than we’ve seen normally from South African teams. We’re trying to go out of the bubble and be a bit more positive and aggressive. If we stick to what we believe, then we will be in the conversation. But we don’t have to be there now, we want to be there in five weeks time,” Gibson said.For more sport your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.last_img read more

Rainforest destruction accelerates in Honduras UNESCO site

first_imgPowerful drug-traffickers and landless farmers continue to push cattle ranching and illegal logging operations deeper into the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in eastern Honduras.Satellite data show the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve lost more than 10 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2017, more than a third of which happened within the last three years of that time period. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate Río Plátano is experiencing another heavy round of forest loss this year, with UMD recording around 160,000 deforestation alerts in the reserve between January and August, which appears to be an uptick from the same period in 2018.Local sources claim the government participates in drug trafficking, and those involved in the drug business are allegedly the same people who are involved in illegal exploitation of the land for cattle ranching and illegal logging of mahogany and cedar.Deforestation in Río Plátano means a loss of habitat for wildlife and a loss of forest resources for indigenous communities that depend on them. But another threat is emerging: water resources are becoming increasingly scarce as forests are converted into grasslands. Powerful drug-traffickers and landless farmers continue to push cattle ranching and illegal logging operations deeper into the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in eastern Honduras.The Mosquitia region, straddling the border of Honduras with Nicaragua, comprises one of the largest contiguous rainforest regions in Latin America north of the Amazon Basin, and the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve holds some of the largest tracts of old growth rainforest remaining in the region.From 2001 to 2017, satellite data from the University of Maryland shows the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve has lost more than 10 percent of its tree cover, more than a third of which happened within the last three years. Preliminary data for 2019 indicate Río Plátano is experiencing another heavy round of forest loss this year, with UMD recording around 160,000 deforestation alerts in the reserve between January and August, which appears to be an uptick from the same period last year.Data from the University of Maryland show deforestation advancing deeper into primary forest, with around 160,000 tree cover alerts detected between January and August this year. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.A visual comparison of alerts recorded so far this year to those detected during the same period in 2018 indicate forest loss is accelerating in and around Río Plátano. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest WatchSatellite images show deforestation has expanded through the reserve’s buffer zones since 2018, entering the dense forest of the core zone. The reserve serves as an important biological corridor for species such as jaguars, giant anteaters, scarlet macaws and the endangered Baird’s tapir. Further, the reserve covers ancestral territory belonging to Miskito indigenous communities, who make up nearly half the population in the reserve, and smaller populations of Pech, Tawahkas and Garífunas.Drugs and death squadsEnvironmentalist activist Darwin Ramos Antunez, who is from the city of Catacamas, Olancho near the Río Plátano Reserve, said that narco-traffickers aligned with the government are the main parties responsible for the deforestation.“The problem is the State under which we live, a narco-government, for the past 10 years,” Ramos Antunez said. “The Mosquitia region is a zone where organized crime, drug cartels control everything with help from the government.”According to Ramos Antunez, the government participates in the drug trafficking and illegal destruction of the region’s biodiversity. He said those involved in the drug business are allegedly the same people who are involved in illegal exploitation of the land for cattle ranching and illegal logging of mahogany and cedar.“The large-scale cattle ranchers and illegal loggers are narco-trafficking landowners who set up shell companies protected by the State. They don’t have permission to exploit the forests but the State allows their operations to continue because they collaborate together,” Ramos Antunez said. “The [landowners] profit from cattle ranching and wood harvesting, but the real business is in the drugs.”A cow wanders in an area cleared of forest in Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.Olancho offers access to Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve from the south, and is a hotbed of illegal timber harvesting as the highways provide a pathway for heavy cargo trucks to carry illegally harvested timber to markets in the more densely populated regions of the country.Ramos Antunez said he was part of a once powerful activist network known as Environmental Movement of Olancho (MAO) that successfully mobilized popular resistance against illegal logging operations in Olancho and Río Plátano Reserve from 2003 to 2008. However, MAO has almost disappeared after a series of prominent activists were killed, and the group’s leader Father Jose Andres Tamayo was exiled after a coup d’état in 2009.“Since 2009, they’ve planted terror by killing so many of our leaders,” Ramos Antunez said. “Today, nobody wants to speak up because there are death squads that will not think twice about killing anyone who gets in the way… If I were still in Honduras, I wouldn’t be able to talk about this.”For his work exposing the drug cartels and illegal timber harvesters, Ramos Antunez said he received death threats and was tortured by death squads before he left the country in late 2018 with the so-called migrant caravan heading north toward the United States. Once he arrived in the U.S. to seek political asylum, he was detained by ICE and held for 8 months at the Adelanto Detention Center, run by for-profit prison contractor GEO Group.In addition, Ramos Antunez said he worked with indigenous Tawahka, Miskitos and Pech communities in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve through a collective called Los Que Callan. He said that the Tawahka, who number around 2,000, are endangered by ongoing settlement in their ancestral lands as well as the construction of a 104-megawatt dam known as “Patuca III,” which was promoted by the government.Ramos Antunez said that before leaving Honduras he had worked with the leftist political party Liberty and Refoundation. Working with Tawahka guides, he said he helped photograph tractors used for building landing strips and wood harvesting deep in the rainforest. Ramos Antunez claimed that because there were neither roads nor waterways that could accommodate such large machinery, tractors must have been flown in by military helicopter, suggesting powerful people were involved.Many areas that once looked like this have been transformed into grasslands. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.According to a source in the Honduran military who spoke to Insight Crime, President Juan Orlando Hernández’s brother and former congressman Juan Antonio “Tony” Hernández, who was arrested by U.S. authorities on drug trafficking charges in November of last year, commanded criminal economies ranging from drug to timber trafficking in Olancho and eastern Mosquitia.New York’s Southern District prosecutors have implicated President Hernández as a co-conspirator in the drug trafficking and money laundering case against his brother, according to documents reported on by Univision.In response to the allegations published in Univision, President Hernández issued a statement that said the president “categorically” denied accusations that he financed his presidential campaigns with irregular money or leveraged drug trafficking to enhance his political power. Forestry cooperatives under continued threatToward the north in the Sico and Paulaya Valley, several communities operate forestry cooperatives in the Río Plátano buffer zone. The forestry cooperatives are supposed to protect a section of the forest where the harvesting of mahogany wood is allowed. The agroforestry cooperatives use mules to transport the wood, which has a lower impact than building roads.In this part of the Mosquitia, illegal timber harvesting is reportedly less prevalent than in Olancho due to a lack of road and river access, but deforestation is still a problem due to ongoing invasion by cattle ranchers.The cattle ranchers who are taking over the land are often landless farmers from interior regions of the country, who are attracted by the opportunity to escape poverty and achieve greater economic and food security. Conservation groups say that in addition to the landless farmers, large-scale landholders encourage the migration to set up massive cattle ranching operations. The landholders can use cattle ranching to secure territory and to launder illicit drug money into the legal economy.Grass and cattle flourish in an area of the biosphere reserve where a forest once stood. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.The Honduran government promotes meat exports as a way to grow the economy. Each year, the country produces 60,000 metric tons of beef, exporting 1,500 metric tons to earn $9 million in foreign exchange dollars.In November 2018, President Juan Orlando Hernandez announced a program called “SOS Honduras” as an emergency measure to stop illegal, mafia-promoted deforestation in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve.Pedro Romelo, who has inside knowledge of the forestry cooperatives but asked for his name to be changed for safety considerations, said that since the president’s announcement there has not been any significant actions or changes in the Sico and Paulaya Valley. He says that agroforestry cooperatives continue to be overrun by cattle ranchers who cut down forests to claim pasture.“SOS Honduras was simply a media show,” Romelo said. “The grasslands grow at an accelerating rate while the forest shrinks faster and faster. There are no consequences for advancing cattle ranching into the biosphere, so they keep coming.”Mongabay reached out to the Honduras government for comment, but had not received a response by the time this article was published.Deforestation in Río Plátano means a loss of habitat for wildlife and a loss of forest resources for indigenous communities that depend on them. But another threat is emerging: With the expansion of grasslands into the biosphere, Romelo said that water resources are becoming increasingly scarce.“The only good thing about the lack of water is people are becoming more conscious about the environmental problems as time goes on,” Romelo said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Corruption, Deforestation, Drug Trade, Environment, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Banner image: Deforestation in the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve. Image by Taran Volckhausen for Mongabay.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Goldman Prize winner launches new environmental foundation in the Cook Islands

first_imgActivism, Conservation, conservation players, Environment, Environmental Activism, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Oceans, philanthropy Article published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A Goldman Prize winner from the Cook Islands who was fired for speaking out against mining the floor of the Pacific Ocean has launched a new foundation to support environmental stewardship and social action.Jacqueline Evans won the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2019 for her central role in establishing Marae Moana in her country: it is the largest multiple-use marine park in the world.“This will give our local organizations the independence they need to speak openly when they believe an injustice has been done,” Evans said in a statement.Evans used about $66,000 of the funds awarded to her by the Goldman Prize to launch the new foundation. Goldman Environmental Prize winner Jacqueline Evans has launched the Moana Foundation to advance environmental and social activism in her home country of the Cook Islands.Evans won the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2019 for her central role in establishing Marae Moana, the largest multiple-use marine park in the world, and has now established the foundation to support the work of Cook Islands NGOs working on environmental and social issues.“This will give our local organizations the independence they need to speak openly when they believe an injustice has been done,” Evans said in a statement.Despite the global recognition of Evans’s environmental leadership, she lost her job as director of Marae Moana later in 2019 for speaking out in support of a 10-year moratorium on seabed mining across the Pacific Ocean.Evans hopes that the fund will enable grantees to focus on local priorities, which is sometimes more difficult when funding comes from entities located overseas, an issue that environmental leaders in Papua New Guinea, another Pacific nation, have also discussed with Mongabay.“We will build the fund up over time to address the pressing needs of future generations of Cook Islanders,” Evans said. “My profound hope is that, one day, it will become a significant resource to protect our environment and look after our people.”Evans is seeding the fund with NZ$100,000 (about $66,000) she received from the Goldman Prize in order to establish the foundation. (Recipients of the Goldman Prize are each awarded $200,000.)An aerial view of Penrhyn, the Cook Islands’ northernmost island, taken in 1995. Image by Ewan Smith via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Banner image of Jacqueline Evans, courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize.last_img read more

Salem Lady Lions cruise past Bluejackets; 64-48

first_imgThe Salem Lady Lions topped the Bluejackets last night at Brooks Memorial Gymnasium, 64-48.Alex Davidson poured in 35 points and collected 10 rebounds as the host Lions (5-8, 0-3) cruised past the Bluejackets (4-8, 2-0). Sadie Soliday also contributed 13 points for Salem.last_img

Pope Francis donates Skoda to Foyle Search and Rescue

first_imgOne of the blue Skoda cars used by Pope Francis during his Irish visit has been donated to Foyle Search and Rescue.The head of the life-saving Derry charity was speechless to hear the good news that the pontiff’s bespoke Skoda ‘Rapid’ would be making its way to the city. Many memorable scenes from the Pope’s visit to Ireland last weekend featured the blue Rapid cars, as Skoda was the official car partner to the World Meeting of Families 2018.  On Pope Francis’ return to the Vatican, it was announced that both cars would be donated to charity.One of these Skoda cars has been given by Archbishop Diarmuid Martin, to Crosscare, the social care agency of the Archdiocese of Dublin, for use by staff in their Mater Dei homeless hub.  Following a recommendation of Archbishop Eamon Martin, the other car used by Pope Francis has been offered to the Derry-based volunteer charity, Foyle Search and Rescue.Skoda was the official car partner to the World Meeting of Families 2018.The chairman of Foyle Search and Rescue, Mr Stephen Twells, said, “I was speechless when I heard the good news!  Foyle Search volunteers are very honoured and most appreciative to be the recipients of this very kind gift. “Pope Francis’ car will provide a morale boost to our volunteers at this time, during what has been a very tough year for all of us in the city.  I also aware that this gift will be a great comfort to many families here in Derry knowing that we have been recognised by the Holy Father, and by Archbishop Martin, for the work that we do.” Foyle Search and Rescue was set up in 1993 by local people in Derry in response to the high number of drownings in the River Foyle.  The service now includes suicide prevention and supporting families in the city.On welcoming the donation to Foyle Search and Rescue Archbishop Eamon Martin said, “I am most appreciative to Archbishop Diarmuid Martin for this generosity regarding this gift of a car used by Pope Francis during his wonderful visit to our country.  This Skoda ‘Rapid’ will be of great practical help to the volunteers of Foyle Search and Rescue as they undertake their brave and vital life-saving work.”Archbishop Eamon continued, “From my time as a priest ministering in Derry, I know well at first-hand how the local Foyle Search and Rescue volunteers work selflessly, and of their own free time, each week to help those who are vulnerable and in need.  The volunteers patrol the river at peak times on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, from 9.30pm to 3.00am, and engage with people in distress, maintain lifebelts and, critically, the volunteers save human lives.”It is envisaged that the blue Skoda ‘Rapid’ will be used by Foyle Search and Rescue volunteers as they undertake their work in patrolling the shores of the River Foyle.  The car will be donated shortly, but will not possess its current number plate ‘SCV 1’ which represents the designation Stato della Citta del Vaticano, or ‘Vatican City’.Pope Francis donates Skoda to Foyle Search and Rescue was last modified: August 28th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

‘See you in June’ – Torres

first_imgFernando Torres after scoring goal againstVålerenga at Ullevaal Stadium, Norway.(Image: Philip Gabrielsen)Looking at the performances of Spain in recent times and considering the players that they’ve had at their disposal throughout their 44-year trophy drought, it’s been an almost bizarre wait for success.However, their current squad, with the likes of Liverpool striker Fernando Torres leading its line, seems to be a golden generation, primed to make up for lost time.The 25-year-old marksman of course can take great credit for bringing an end to Spanish suffering, but what are his theories on why it took so long for them to make the breakthrough on the international stage?“We’ve always gone into major tournaments as one of the favourites but we always faltered along the way. There was always something missing,” Torres says.Asked what that missing element might have been, Torres suggests, “ambition, especially in the quarterfinals when we often lost”.“I think that the semifinal against Italy [in 2008] is when we really won the European Championship,” he says. “And then in the final against Germany we went in as giants and showed to ourselves that Spanish football is going through a great period and we now have to make the most of it.”Make the most of it La Roja Furia (The Red Fury) certainly have, they are currently ranked number one in the world on the back of being unbeaten since February 2007. They have also made an impressive start to the 2010 Fifa World Cup preliminaries as they currently sit atop Europe’s Group 5 (with a full haul of points from four matches), ahead of Turkey and Belgium.Taking all this into consideration, they should be good bets to triumph – should they qualify – at South Africa 2010 then. “El Niño”, though, feels that it would be better if they, as a team, were a little more circumspect than that.“I think there are bigger favourites than us, even though we are the European champions,” Torres says. “There’s always Italy, Germany, France and, above all, Argentina and Brazil. Those are teams that have already won Fifa World Cups; national sides that always get to the latter stages and they will always be the favourites in these kinds of tournaments.“Maybe Spain deserve to be included now after the European Championship and given our form in the qualifiers. What we do know is that more and more teams are respecting us, just like we used to respect other sides. You can see that out on the pitch.”What makes Spain’s continuing excellent form ever the more remarkable is that they’ve done this despite experiencing a change of coach. After their European triumph, Luis Aragones vacated the post and former Real Madrid manager Vicente Del Bosque assumed it. Interestingly, Del Bosque had not had a senior coaching job since 2005 but Torres feels he did well to not fix that which was not broken.“The new coach has given continuity to the ideas of his predecessor. He is also trying to exert a little of his own influence on the group but he has made the most of what was already in place. I think he was very wise to stick with what was working but I think that we can still improve.“He’s trying to make us even better but there’s a strong case for not making too many changes when things are working well,” Torres says.Of course, Torres, with 18 goals in his 59 caps, will be vital to their prospects in South Africa come 2010; but he is well aware that there’s also the not-so-little matter of this year’s Fifa Confederations Cup to compete for.“It’s the first time we’ve qualified for the Fifa Confederations Cup and we’re looking forward to it. As with every competition at this level it’s sure to be a great event and it will be excellent preparation for the Fifa World Cup next year.”“Can they win this too?”, will be the question on everybody’s lips come June 2009. Torres hedges his bets when he says, “We’ll try to be at our best and hopefully the fans in South Africa, as well as supporting their own national side, will adopt Spain as their second favourite team.”Beyond that, the likeable Madrilenian suggests, people should just wait and see.“I’ll be looking forward to seeing them in June for the Fifa Confederations Cup in South Africa. Ke Nako!”Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]: 2010 Fifa World Cup Update MagazineRelated articlesFrom Finland to SA’s Fifa Cup World Cup ticket frenzy Uefa praises SA’s 2010 readiness Winning the World Cup of branding Useful linksFifaReal Federación Española de Fútbol (Spanish)last_img read more